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Old 12-08-2001, 04:09 PM   #4
CosmoTheCat
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Member#: 3409
Join Date: Jan 2001
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Woolley
Vehicle:
1998 Ram 2500
Green.

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From the NHTSA website:

Quote:
49 CFR Part 581, "The bumper standard," prescribes performance requirements for passenger cars in low-speed front and rear collisions. It applies to front and rear bumpers on passenger cars to prevent the damage to the car body and safety related equipment at barrier impact speeds of 2 mph across the full width and 1 mph on the corners.
Quote:
On April 9, 1971, the agency issued its first passenger car bumper standard -- Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standard (FMVSS) 215, "Exterior Protection," which became effective on September 1, 1972. This standard called for passenger cars, beginning with model year (MY) 1973, to withstand 5 mph front and 2 mph rear impacts against a perpendicular barrier without damage to certain safety-related components such as headlamps and fuel systems.
Quote:
For MY 1979, the standard required that there be no damage to safety-related parts and exterior surfaces not involving the bumper system(e.g., sheet metal; lamps; and fuel, exhaust and cooling systems) with damage to the facebar and its fasteners at impact test speed of 5 mph front and rear impacts with barrier and pendulum; 3 mph corner impact with pendulum.
Quote:
While the impact speed in the Canadian standard is higher than that in the U.S. standard, the Canadian standard has less stringent protective criteria. Specifically, the protective criteria for the Canadian standard requires that the vehicle does not touch the test device, except on the impact ridge with a force that exceeds 2000 lbs. on the combined surface of the test device.
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/proble...per/index.html


Quote:
The requirement that there be no damage to the bumper itself beyond a 3/8 inch "dent" and 3/4 inch "set" (or displacement) from original position was changed to allow damage to the bumper itself while still requiring no damage to safety-related parts and exterior surfaces not involving the bumper
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/rules/...te/807072.html


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