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Old 01-13-2011, 02:15 AM   #4
Back Road Runner
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 60082
Join Date: Apr 2004
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Minnesota
Vehicle:
2004 Forester STI
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Well, for starters make sure that the epoxy you use with the CF handles heat. Some exhaust gas does end up back into the intake, and the IM needs to handle some heat. Subaru is of course using some plastic IMs, and the right thermoset does do the job. Epoxy is a form of thermoset, so it's a matter of using the right one. It may be that you will need an oven to cure the epoxy if it's a high temp variant. The carbon itself doesn't care about the heat, but the plastic does. Some used for high temp applications don't set at room temp. This may affect your part design if it needs to fit in some oven.

You might want to start off looking at some data that doesn't revolve around a random, turbocharged car. There are some basic calculations you can work with. I've found some useful information in the past over on Team Integra's forum:
http://www.team-integra.net/sections...?ArticleID=466

I will also point you to some engine modeling software, Engine Analyzer Pro 3.9:
http://performancetrends.com/program...0Installer.exe
It has a 10 day full trial. The program auto-locks after the 10th day though, and the lock is permanent and stored somewhere else on the harddrive. There are work arounds that are a hassle. Frankly, your school should have Engine Analyzer Pro and possibly Dynomation too, at least mine does. If your school has an automotive program, it should have a lab with it.

You'll need to get a lot of the main specs for the motor to model it up, and finding all of the info can be a chore. The more accurate you are with the info, the better the numbers you'll get. Then you can have the program run through length, diameter, plenum size, etc for you and show you what works best. I will note that other factors do influence the results including cams, head flow, exhaust, etc. You may have to think about what you are designing this IM to do. From what I've seen with teh 2.5L, stock is pretty close to ideal for a stock geared motor. Changes aren't necessary until you modify the flow requirements sufficiently.
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