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Old 01-11-2013, 03:46 PM   #33
fredzy
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Member#: 317270
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: Erie, PA
Vehicle:
15 WRX, WRB 6MT
14 CX-5

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gpshumway View Post
1 - The FR-S starts at $25k and it has unique chassis and drivetrain.
2 - The CR-Z starts at $20k, despite its expensive hybrid drivetrain.
3 - The Civic Si starts at $22.5k.
4 - The drivetrain I mention would be identical to the next gen Si drivetrain, possibly minus the header, which is about optimizing powerband for a sports car and doesn't cost much.

Given the above facts, please explain to me why my suggestion is so unrealistic. It's $4.5k more expensive than an Si, and $2k more expensive than an FR-S, which shares fewer parts with other cars than my conceptual mid-engine S2000 would. Might it be more like $29-32k? Maybe, but a coupe which shares a transverse drivetrain with the Civic Si could certainly be brought out for less than the $35k S2000 with it's unique chassis and drivetrain plus power top.

Honda used to make the CRX and Prelude, both affordable, simple sports cars with a modest premium over other cars in the Honda lineup with which they shared much componentry. Why is it so unrealistic to think they could do it again?
A baby NSX that is essentially a backwards Civic Si shouldn't cost substantially more than a frontwards Civic Si. But if there will continue to be a Civic Si, and they will replace the S2000 with another S2000, I'd bet this baby NSX would fill the giant gap between the S2000 and NSX. 2800 lbs with 350hp V6 for $50k would make a lot of sense. Far too much sense...

Whatever they do will end up addled with heavy electric motors and batteries. It will be underwhelming, overcomplicated and overpriced. But hey, slightly more efficient.
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