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Old 03-05-2013, 12:18 PM   #28
elirentz
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 70082
Join Date: Sep 2004
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: charleston, sc
Vehicle:
2005 sti, 02 s2000
88 944 beater

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Quote:
Originally Posted by scott_gunn View Post
The electrical components give it:

- Allow it to have a higher revving engine (9250 RPM redline, optimized for power at higher RPMs)
- More torque across the RPM range
- Lower center of gravity
- Better fuel efficiency
- Smaller overall "package" due to removal of alternator
- Better power/weight ratio

Seems like it is not just technology for the sake of technology.
Not that I disagree with you in principle but the whole added weight thing is what Scrappy seems to be talking about. How do you know the power/ weight ratio is better with the added electric drive-train and batteries, has it been stated by Ferrari somewhere that it is?

The added weight has always been the argument against adding the hybrid system to performance cars. Look at what happened the first year F1 used KERS, for the most part the non-kers equipped cars were faster only because they could move the weight around to where they wanted and didn't have packaging constraints. They all had to be the same weight and the kers cars had an extra 80hp. The only reason they went back to using it was they all agreed to after some incentive from the FIA.

While I am glad Ferrari, Porsche, and McLaren are making these cars. If I were in the market (read: had the $$$$$$$) for a supercar I would prefer it to be either pure combustion or pure electric because the integration of the two powertrains necessitates engineering solutions that are overly complicated IMO.
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