Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Wednesday November 26, 2014
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences Home Registration is free! Visit the NASIOC Store NASIOC Rules Search Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Calendar Archive NASIOC Upgrade Garage Logout
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC General > News & Rumors > Non-Subaru News & Rumors

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-11-2013, 09:19 PM   #51
KC
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 442
Join Date: Oct 1999
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: SE Mass/RI
Vehicle:
2013 Crosstrek XV
00 Honda S2000

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by RealDealTarheel View Post
If only they used all the funds collected for roads on the roads now. They could start there.
This x infinity. Why is it expensive?

Reduce the costs for repairing them where a day isnt 3 hrs of work and 5hs of break by a crew of 15 watching 4 people work.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
KC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 09:54 PM   #52
Concillian
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 4414
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Dublin, CA
Vehicle:
2002 WRX Sedan
Midnight Black

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gpshumway View Post
The gas tax is certainly easier, but a mileage tax has the potential to be more efficient. As a general rule though, I think road maintenance should be paid for primarily by those who use the roads most. We should stop subsidizing the long commutes of some with the income tax of people who live near work.

They don't say this explicitly, but it would be a good idea to have a mileage tax with the rate of taxation based on vehicle mass. Why? Because it's generally accepted that wear on roads goes with the 4th power of vehicle mass[1]. So a 6,000lb SUV wears out the roads 16 times faster than a 3,000lb sedan. Since said SUV gets much better than 1/16th the fuel economy of the sedan, gasoline taxes cause sedan drivers to pay for road repairs which should be attributed to SUV drivers. In that way, a mileage tax could be more efficient. Of course we currently have the infrastructure to collect gas taxes, but not mileage taxes, at least not everywhere. Minnesota (as an example) doesn't have state vehicle inspections.

[1] AASHO Road Test - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
If we have the data to back it up, let's do this. But don't charge it as a per year tax, or per mileage. Both of those are unnecessarily complex.

Charge it based on average total vehicle miles for a given vehicle type and charge it up front. Let people see what it costs up front, because people are apparently too dumb to understand anything else. Give it the full impact of the cost of heavy vehicles. If people still want a heavy vehicle, let them pay the costs.

The "price of gas" would decrease, so you would "earn back" your payment through cheaper monthly outlay. This would be the least overall administration to also tax people based on what it actually costs. Screw incentivization of anything. The government is there to provide services for it's people, not to socially engineer them. You want an SUV and we have data that says that costs 4x as much to repair the roads as a sub-compact, you have to decide if your needs or wants are worth the cost.

This kind of taxation works well for tire and e-waste recycling, where disposal and associated overhead costs are collected at time of purchase. There is already precedence for these kinds of things to be collected in an up-front manner.

Last edited by Concillian; 01-11-2013 at 10:07 PM.
Concillian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 10:14 PM   #53
gpshumway
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 43950
Join Date: Sep 2003
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Minneapolis, MN
Vehicle:
07 WRX LTD Wagon
Satin White Pearl

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCRAPPYDO View Post
What about the increase in the past 4 years of some 240,000 federal employees.

yes, I am talking recent history, like the hundreds of thousands of jobs added under the Bush and Obama administrations...
What about it? To me it's a number some guy on the internet pulled out of his nether region. The official numbers from the OPM end in 2010, and include temporary workers for the census.

I'm not your research assistant, cite a source and research its credibility on your own.
gpshumway is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 10:16 PM   #54
shikataganai
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 92634
Join Date: Aug 2005
Chapter/Region: RMIC
Vehicle:
2007 Land Cruiser
2013 LEAF

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Concillian View Post
Charge it based on average total vehicle miles for a given vehicle type and charge it up front.

Screw incentivization of anything.
Your two statements above are mutually exclusive. Your avg miles plan would provide an incentive to drive more by over-taxing those who drive less than the mean.
shikataganai is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 10:17 PM   #55
industrial
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 7250
Join Date: Jun 2001
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Home
Vehicle:
2014 Forester & BRZ
MBP & WRB

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gpshumway View Post
What about it? To me it's a number some guy on the internet pulled out of his nether region. The official numbers from the OPM end in 2010, and include temporary workers for the census.

I'm not your research assistant, cite a source and research its credibility on your own.
I'm sure it's from the ticker on Fox who got it from a blog post about a chain e-mail sent out a few months ago.
industrial is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 10:32 PM   #56
WRXHillClimb
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 206907
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Abq, NM
Vehicle:
2014 EvoX GSR
2005 S2000 Track Car

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by shikataganai View Post
Your two statements above are mutually exclusive. Your avg miles plan would provide an incentive to drive more by over-taxing those who drive less than the mean.
So are you saying that because I pay for just internet as a service at a flat rate that I'm subconsciously going to want to spend more than the "average user's" amount of time on it because it's more expensive in terms of my consumption if I don't?

That's an asinine argument.

I'm going to drive however much I'm going to drive. I certainly wouldn't drive MORE just because I felt if I drove under the average that I wasn't getting my moneys worth. That's more gas, higher insurance, and a larger waste of time (daily driving on public roads is about as far from something I want to do as possible).

It's a SERVICE to have access to the roads, unlimited, as they are. Same as insurance, same as internet, same as TV, same as lots of stuff.

I don't want to see more crap converted to usage-based. Phone internet is bad enough.
WRXHillClimb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 10:42 PM   #57
gggplaya
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 139444
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: PA
Vehicle:
2008 Impreza
Dark Gray

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by WRXHillClimb View Post
So are you saying that because I pay for just internet as a service at a flat rate that I'm subconsciously going to want to spend more than the "average user's" amount of time on it because it's more expensive in terms of my consumption if I don't?

That's an asinine argument.

I'm going to drive however much I'm going to drive. I certainly wouldn't drive MORE just because I felt if I drove under the average that I wasn't getting my moneys worth. That's more gas, higher insurance, and a larger waste of time (daily driving on public roads is about as far from something I want to do as possible).

It's a SERVICE to have access to the roads, unlimited, as they are. Same as insurance, same as internet, same as TV, same as lots of stuff.

I don't want to see more crap converted to usage-based. Phone internet is bad enough.
I think people already try to conserve mileage based on fuel prices more so than odometer readings.
gggplaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 10:47 PM   #58
gggplaya
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 139444
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: PA
Vehicle:
2008 Impreza
Dark Gray

Default

I think this whole tax based on mileage thing is flawed and requires too much administration on a yearly basis.

My answer is just to tax new vehicles with a road use tax based on the average life of the vehicle. Lets just say a vehicle uses 150k-200k miles on average before people get rid of them. When a new car dealer sells the vehicle, they charge the normal state tax and then a seperate tax based on the vehicle class, weight, size etc... This gets rolled into the car loan and is alot more absorbable to the buyer than the headache of paying a yearly mileage tax. It charges the road usage tax for the life of the vehicle and eliminate a ton of extra administration. The dealers wire the collected money to the federal account.

Does anyone know how much money is needed for the road budget? Roughly 13 million passenger vehicles are sold in the U.S. every year. If the average tax is $300, than that's $3.9 billion added to the road budget. We aren't even counting big rigs.
gggplaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 01:30 AM   #59
dangerousatom
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 70710
Join Date: Sep 2004
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: Quakertown/AREA1320 391whp
Vehicle:
2002 04STi Swaped RS
w/PPGS & 02 Wagon w/PPGs

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sxotty View Post
You are kinda very wrong about oil. We don't have enough conventional oil. If we did we would be using it instead of more expensive alternatives. If someone else sells us oil cheaper than we can produce it here why shouldn't we import it?
Google search this phrase "how much US oil goes overseas"

The issue is we sell it, or I should say Exxon and other oil Co. dont particularly care about the US and its economy. As long as the world market price is high and there is a market to sell it to they will. If we had the proper infrastructure to refine it, and more so if our government would put the smack down on the oil Co. only letting them sell it in house all our gas prices would be half if not less then what they are today. If gas prices go down then people inevitably have more money to spend nearly immediately. Long term the public would have more money as well because prices across all consumables will go down, because the cost of shipping goods and public transportation will go down.

The larger issue IMO is the US and the world market for all things sold is not setup in a way to have the ability to support an exponential growth and profit scenario. Greed and the preservation of continuous profit are the major flaws.

The system of manufacturing, selling, and consumers needs is far too large of a monstrosity to ever get truly solved. The issue would only be solvable in a Utopianistic society with ironclad rules that all people followed to the letter. This topic/debate will go on for a millennium unless we all ( the world ) decide to stop looking out for #1 and expecting even our most trusted friend to inevitably stab us in the back.
dangerousatom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 02:05 AM   #60
AllAWD
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 17079
Join Date: Apr 2002
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Alexandria, VA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dangerousatom View Post
Google search this phrase "how much US oil goes overseas"

The issue is we sell it, or I should say Exxon and other oil Co. dont particularly care about the US and its economy. As long as the world market price is high and there is a market to sell it to they will. If we had the proper infrastructure to refine it, and more so if our government would put the smack down on the oil Co. only letting them sell it in house all our gas prices would be half if not less then what they are today. If gas prices go down then people inevitably have more money to spend nearly immediately. Long term the public would have more money as well because prices across all consumables will go down, because the cost of shipping goods and public transportation will go down.

The larger issue IMO is the US and the world market for all things sold is not setup in a way to have the ability to support an exponential growth and profit scenario. Greed and the preservation of continuous profit are the major flaws.

The system of manufacturing, selling, and consumers needs is far too large of a monstrosity to ever get truly solved. The issue would only be solvable in a Utopianistic society with ironclad rules that all people followed to the letter. This topic/debate will go on for a millennium unless we all ( the world ) decide to stop looking out for #1 and expecting even our most trusted friend to inevitably stab us in the back.
So your solution would be for more American companies to not sell their products at higher prices. Then spend lots of capitol to build up their infrastructure to refine gasoline for us to buy. Because a company being profitable is bad.

Not saying it's not a nice idea, but I'm going to guess running a business might not be your forte.
AllAWD is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 02:18 AM   #61
dangerousatom
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 70710
Join Date: Sep 2004
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: Quakertown/AREA1320 391whp
Vehicle:
2002 04STi Swaped RS
w/PPGS & 02 Wagon w/PPGs

Default

Not saying that or at least not trying to say that.

Im all for profiting, its just that so much could be done to better our own country with the oil, the profits from it ect... Im just tired of seeing everything go to crap because of the last part of my above post. In the end I must default to my belief that there will never be a sound solution to all the madness until its all over.
dangerousatom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 09:17 AM   #62
sxotty
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 95600
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Pittsburgh
Vehicle:
2003 WRX wagon
Silver

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dangerousatom View Post
Google search this phrase "how much US oil goes overseas"

The issue is we sell it, or I should say Exxon and other oil Co. dont particularly care about the US and its economy. As long as the world market price is high and there is a market to sell it to they will. If we had the proper infrastructure to refine it, and more so if our government would put the smack down on the oil Co. only letting them sell it in house all our gas prices would be half if not less then what they are today.
You are very confused. Look at EIA data

Here is what googling that phrase results in
Quote:
In September, the United States exported 35,000 barrels a day of unrefined crude oil. That same month, the U.S. imported 9 million barrels of crude oil a day. If you look just at crude, the U.S. is the same huge importer of oil it has been for as long as most of us can remember.
Ok let me do some math 9 million - 35,000 hmm carry the one ok yeah it seems like 8,965,000 million barrels of net imported oil makes us an importer. We export refined product. That is a good thing. We take in a less valuable product, perform a service by refining it and then export refined product. The refiners make money, it provides US jobs. If we did not export it we could not run those refineries at capacity so they would sit idle more of the time depreciating. How is that useful?
sxotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 09:46 AM   #63
gggplaya
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 139444
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: PA
Vehicle:
2008 Impreza
Dark Gray

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dangerousatom View Post
Google search this phrase "how much US oil goes overseas"

The issue is we sell it, or I should say Exxon and other oil Co. dont particularly care about the US and its economy. As long as the world market price is high and there is a market to sell it to they will. If we had the proper infrastructure to refine it, and more so if our government would put the smack down on the oil Co. only letting them sell it in house all our gas prices would be half if not less then what they are today. If gas prices go down then people inevitably have more money to spend nearly immediately. Long term the public would have more money as well because prices across all consumables will go down, because the cost of shipping goods and public transportation will go down.

The larger issue IMO is the US and the world market for all things sold is not setup in a way to have the ability to support an exponential growth and profit scenario. Greed and the preservation of continuous profit are the major flaws.

The system of manufacturing, selling, and consumers needs is far too large of a monstrosity to ever get truly solved. The issue would only be solvable in a Utopianistic society with ironclad rules that all people followed to the letter. This topic/debate will go on for a millennium unless we all ( the world ) decide to stop looking out for #1 and expecting even our most trusted friend to inevitably stab us in the back.
Our oil is different from the oil we import, it's harder to refine to meet our emissions than the middle eastern oil. By the time you refine our oil, you'll probably find it cost more than imported oil. However, there are other countries like Brazil that are still on tier 2 or even tier 0 emissions(no emissions). So there is profit to be made by exporting to them, but you would break even or take a loss selling it here in the united states.

Keep in mind that our fuel prices are like half of what the rest of the world pays. While we pay $3.50 a gallon, europe is paying $5 and japan is paying $6-7. We have damn cheap oil, and even with the same government subsidies, it's still hard to compete in our marketplace. You simply need massive volumes of oil to sell at those prices. With massive volume, you need massive local drilling and massive local refineries which we don't have.
gggplaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 10:49 AM   #64
sniper1rfa
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 141040
Join Date: Feb 2007
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Designing things
Vehicle:
07 2.5i wagon
UGM

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gggplaya View Post
As a commuter, **** this legislation. It's totally unfair. I travel all highway and rack up mileage much faster. This is total bull****!!!
Doesn't really make a difference for you either way, since you're either paying tax based on mileage or tax based on fuel consumed (which is a tax on mileage, more or less).

In fact, I don't really get the difference between a mileage tax and gas tax, since gas tax is just a mileage tax paid a little differently. The only difference I can think of is that an increase in gas tax would keep encouraging people to drive more efficient cars and drive less, while a mileage tax would only encourage people to drive less.



But then, it doesn't really matter much to me. My tank lasts me a month or more, and I ride a bike that gets 75mpg about 8 months out of the year. Gas tax or mileage tax, whatever. Don't care.

I like the idea of a road tax built into the purchase of new cars. Automatically ensures that you can maintain the roads for that car over its lifetime.
sniper1rfa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 11:33 AM   #65
SCRAPPYDO
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 873
Join Date: Feb 2000
Chapter/Region: TXIC
Location: Just outside of Houston TX
Vehicle:
2013 F150 King Ranch
Datsun 71 240Z & 68 2000

Default

would you pay the road tax built into a car purchase when you purchase it used? I mean the total tax is included in the purchase price of a new car, but would you have to pay it again and again, each time the car is sold?
SCRAPPYDO is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 11:37 AM   #66
shikataganai
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 92634
Join Date: Aug 2005
Chapter/Region: RMIC
Vehicle:
2007 Land Cruiser
2013 LEAF

Default

You have to pay sales/use tax on used vehicles that were already taxed in full to the original purchaser when bought new… This is especially jarring for EVs that are exempt in many states from said sales tax only when new.
shikataganai is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 01:56 PM   #67
White out
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 46277
Join Date: Oct 2003
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Michigan
Vehicle:
** Ring Time of
7:43.5

Default

I just spent $18 to renew my driver's license (every 4 years); maybe that price should be hiked up to the $100-200 range. It would generate a little income. Feds need to figure out how to get a % of it, but that would probably be easier than tax by the mile?

Do burnouts & track days get taxed, or is there an exception to that?
White out is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 05:03 PM   #68
sxotty
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 95600
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Pittsburgh
Vehicle:
2003 WRX wagon
Silver

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCRAPPYDO View Post
would you pay the road tax built into a car purchase when you purchase it used? I mean the total tax is included in the purchase price of a new car, but would you have to pay it again and again, each time the car is sold?
I think you are right that it is a silly idea.

Why in the world would you charge people a road tax on a vehicle instead of taxing them based on the damage they do to roads.

Fuel use is correlated to miles traveled and to vehicle mass. It is a darn good system actually. Sure advanced vehicles might mess with it, but they are a negligible part of the fleet still.
sxotty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 09:46 PM   #69
Concillian
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 4414
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Dublin, CA
Vehicle:
2002 WRX Sedan
Midnight Black

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCRAPPYDO View Post
would you pay the road tax built into a car purchase when you purchase it used? I mean the total tax is included in the purchase price of a new car, but would you have to pay it again and again, each time the car is sold?
I wouldn't think so. Over time that would just get built into the KBB value, but initially it would probably penalize low mileage owners.
Concillian is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 09:58 PM   #70
SCRAPPYDO
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 873
Join Date: Feb 2000
Chapter/Region: TXIC
Location: Just outside of Houston TX
Vehicle:
2013 F150 King Ranch
Datsun 71 240Z & 68 2000

Default

I would rather see the gas tax over a built into price for cars.
Then again, I would rather see all the pork out of washington and use the plethora of money they already have. But we all know that aint gonna happen
SCRAPPYDO is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2013, 11:26 PM   #71
hkerekes
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 66310
Join Date: Jul 2004
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Removing passenger seat
Vehicle:
2012 Orange

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gpshumway View Post
The US relies much more on trucking than other countries partly because of the subsidies to road infrastructure. Trains are a much more efficient way to move goods, both fuel wise and traffic wise.

.
You still need a truck to move it to and from the train yard. They take forever and adds an extra step in the process.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gggplaya View Post


An 18 wheeler is different. First truck drivers usually keep 2 log books and fudge them as needed to make their destination in record time. They can leave and travel as soon as their cargo is loaded. They have to stop every 150 miles for a 15 minute break and check their cargo(flatbed trailer). They have to take so many sleep breaks if it's a long haul.
You are clearly mistaken. You cant run 2 log books anymore, its all electronic logs. Noone stops every 150 miles for a 15 minute break. The length of the trip has nothing to do with sleep breaks.

You can only drive 11 hours total in a day. Once you start working you have 14 hours to finish your total driving. After you stop you need 10 hours off to restart your 14 hours. You can only work 70 hours total in 8 days. If you take off 34 consecutive hours you get a fresh 70/14 to start over.

Every country is run by the trucking industry. 6-7 mpg all day long.
hkerekes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 12:26 AM   #72
gggplaya
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 139444
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: PA
Vehicle:
2008 Impreza
Dark Gray

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkerekes View Post
You still need a truck to move it to and from the train yard. They take forever and adds an extra step in the process.



You are clearly mistaken. You cant run 2 log books anymore, its all electronic logs. Noone stops every 150 miles for a 15 minute break. The length of the trip has nothing to do with sleep breaks.

You can only drive 11 hours total in a day. Once you start working you have 14 hours to finish your total driving. After you stop you need 10 hours off to restart your 14 hours. You can only work 70 hours total in 8 days. If you take off 34 consecutive hours you get a fresh 70/14 to start over.

Every country is run by the trucking industry. 6-7 mpg all day long.
Actually from what i remember taking the CDL test. You must stop every 3 hours or 150 miles to take a break. You must also do an inspection of your straps and cargo in an open trailer.

As for electronic log books, that may be true for larger 18 wheeler companies. I've seen more and more guys with computers in their rigs, using them to pull permits. But i also still have guys show up needing to use our fax machine to get their permits. Also my company for our F550/5500 series pickups used for commercial towing, we still fill out manual log books. I don't fudge mine because we usually don't need to get there in a hurry.
gggplaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 12:31 AM   #73
gggplaya
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 139444
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: PA
Vehicle:
2008 Impreza
Dark Gray

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SCRAPPYDO View Post
would you pay the road tax built into a car purchase when you purchase it used? I mean the total tax is included in the purchase price of a new car, but would you have to pay it again and again, each time the car is sold?

You see that's the beauty of a road use tax on new cars. You base the tax on the expected average lifespan of the vehicle, similar to the way they calculate lease rates based on the depreciation value. You factor in the weight, class, axles etc... and charge that to the new car buyer.

So the road use tax has already been paid for that vehicle, so used car sales wouldn't have to pay it, but the resale value of a vehicle has that initial cost factored in.
gggplaya is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 01:26 AM   #74
hkerekes
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 66310
Join Date: Jul 2004
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Removing passenger seat
Vehicle:
2012 Orange

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by gggplaya View Post
Actually from what i remember taking the CDL test. You must stop every 3 hours or 150 miles to take a break. You must also do an inspection of your straps and cargo in an open trailer.

As for electronic log books, that may be true for larger 18 wheeler companies. I've seen more and more guys with computers in their rigs, using them to pull permits. But i also still have guys show up needing to use our fax machine to get their permits. Also my company for our F550/5500 series pickups used for commercial towing, we still fill out manual log books. I don't fudge mine because we usually don't need to get there in a hurry.
Permits have nothing to do with log books. Who is going to actually check or prove you have or havent stopped in 3 hours? Flatbed or not NO ONE does it and i dont believe its actually a rule anymore.

Either way a tax based on miles is going to raise the price on everything. We add a fuel surcharge for every delivery even if its 1 case.
hkerekes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2013, 10:11 AM   #75
ThrawlWRX
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 55878
Join Date: Feb 2004
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: BFIE
Vehicle:
2013 GR LTD & 03 GD
SWP / PSM

Default

Orange county already has a tax on gas that goes to fwy upkeep. Anyone notice when you leave the OC how the Fwy turns crappy? Not every county in the US has it and tracking our mileage is just another way to track drivers with their little black boxes. First it's to impose a tax, then it's speeding tickets based on how long it took you to get from point A to B... I'm fine with a tax on gas but that $ better go to our roads and not something stupid like raises for congress (who in my opinion should only be paid the avg for the region they represent!) or more gun control BS.

Last edited by ThrawlWRX; 01-13-2013 at 11:22 AM.
ThrawlWRX is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2014 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2014, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.