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Old 08-16-2013, 07:46 PM   #76
Bag Riders Air Ride
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Originally Posted by mhs5074 View Post
For all of your AirLift v2 riders out there: what have you found to be the optimal daily driving pressures and damper settings? Looking for the most comfortable ride here
I drive around with about 42 psi up front and ~55-60 psi in the rear, threaded real short in order to maintain a firmer spring while while driving low My dampers are set at -5 up front and -7 in the rear, those numbers are from full stiffness (i.e., softest is -30).

Cheers,
John
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Old 08-26-2013, 11:48 AM   #77
25rsti
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John, or anyone.
Do you guys have any idea how I can weld or connect the sensor arm to my front control arm without a TIG welder? I have a flux core welder which will not work. I bought some aluminum rod and a propane torch and the rod would braze/melt but wouldn't adhere and just flaked off once cool.
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Old 08-26-2013, 12:17 PM   #78
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Originally Posted by 25rsti View Post
John, or anyone.
Do you guys have any idea how I can weld or connect the sensor arm to my front control arm without a TIG welder? I have a flux core welder which will not work. I bought some aluminum rod and a propane torch and the rod would braze/melt but wouldn't adhere and just flaked off once cool.
I used our little Lincoln MIG welder to mate the ball-joint for the sensor linkage to my control arms, they're still there and holding strong!
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Old 10-03-2013, 07:17 PM   #79
ca18detsilvia
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Decided it had been too long since I had a fun car and picked up an 06 wagon a month ago. Of course it still has the stock suspension and I have been debating on what to do. I don't have any desire to slam my car because I plan to take it off road and play around a good bit and have actually considered lifting it an inch. Since they are threaded bodies can you set these up where at its lowest point it drops an inch or two and then be able to raise it up an inch or so?
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Old 10-03-2013, 07:57 PM   #80
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Originally Posted by ca18detsilvia View Post
Decided it had been too long since I had a fun car and picked up an 06 wagon a month ago. Of course it still has the stock suspension and I have been debating on what to do. I don't have any desire to slam my car because I plan to take it off road and play around a good bit and have actually considered lifting it an inch. Since they are threaded bodies can you set these up where at its lowest point it drops an inch or two and then be able to raise it up an inch or so?
You can but from my experience with AirLift's kit, it drives like **** when jacked up high. Like extremely uncomfortable
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Old 10-04-2013, 08:42 AM   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ca18detsilvia View Post
Decided it had been too long since I had a fun car and picked up an 06 wagon a month ago. Of course it still has the stock suspension and I have been debating on what to do. I don't have any desire to slam my car because I plan to take it off road and play around a good bit and have actually considered lifting it an inch. Since they are threaded bodies can you set these up where at its lowest point it drops an inch or two and then be able to raise it up an inch or so?
Yes absolutely! If you thread the lower bracket downward on the strut body, you can configure your suspension for more lift. Of course, you will sacrifice drop, but that is to be expected and for you it doesn't seem like a big deal. Remember, air spring pressure = spring rate, so you don't just want to take the struts out of the box, install them, then ride around with an excessive amount of pressure in the bags. The correct method is to lengthen the struts by threading the bracket downward so that you can drive around at your desired height with an acceptable amount of pressure. Air Lift recommends around 50psi for a sporty ride. The damper's used in the GD/GG air struts have about 5.5" of stroke front and rear. The 08+ (GR/GV/GE/GH) suspension has the same 5.5" stroke up front and about 2.5" for the rear shocks as they are incredibly short.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mhs5074 View Post
You can but from my experience with AirLift's kit, it drives like **** when jacked up high. Like extremely uncomfortable
That is true of ANY air suspension with an excessive amount of pressure in the air spring. The cause of course, is that you're riding in the very upper range of the damper's stroke, which results in the piston reaching the limit of its travel range while driving. Air Lift struts with threaded bodies allow you to mitigate this by lengthening the struts. This is the correct course of action if you desire to drive the vehicle lifted. You should always aim to be driving as close to mid-stroke as possible!
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Old 10-05-2013, 11:13 AM   #82
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My wife has a '12 Impreza (non WRX). Would we be looking at a universal kit with mods in order to bag it, or have you all had anyone with the new body style get an existing set-up to work? Thanks!

rob
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Old 10-06-2013, 11:55 AM   #83
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So what is the highest psi you can run safely and what is the lowest you can run comfortably. Reason I ask is if I set it 50-55 with stock ride height. How low could I go comfortably and how much would it raise up over that? I am quite intrigued and am seriously thinking about trying it out.
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Old 10-07-2013, 07:50 AM   #84
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Originally Posted by SXfour View Post
My wife has a '12 Impreza (non WRX). Would we be looking at a universal kit with mods in order to bag it, or have you all had anyone with the new body style get an existing set-up to work? Thanks!

rob
The newer Impreza's do not share the same platform as the GR/GV WRX/STi, however we can surely build you a bolt-up kit Shoot me a PM, e-mail ([email protected]) or give us a ring 802 735 2574 (M-F 9am-5pm EST) and we can provide all the information about the kit and answer any questions you may have!

Quote:
Originally Posted by ca18detsilvia View Post
So what is the highest psi you can run safely and what is the lowest you can run comfortably. Reason I ask is if I set it 50-55 with stock ride height. How low could I go comfortably and how much would it raise up over that? I am quite intrigued and am seriously thinking about trying it out.
That's a relatively opinionated question, and the answer will vary depending on the weight in the cabin. On a GD chassis the front and rear struts will reach the limit of their stroke around 80-90psi depending on a few atmospheric factors, and around 25-30psi would be a reasonable guesstimate for driving slammed. It is not intended that you drive the vehicle with spring pressure's that exceed the recommended ratings for any extended period, nor would you want to due to a bumpy ride. Going down a dirt road is a great example of a time that I will lift my vehicle to about 85% suspension travel, yet still try to dodge pot-holes to the best of my ability.

Generally speaking, for optimal driving comfort you want to be as close to 50% of the suspension's travel range as possible. For lifted driving, I find about 85% travel to be perfect at providing the lift I need without the consistent chatter of the shock's piston reaching max stroke. When driving low, for example the e-Level system sets your "Preset 1" to 10% of the suspension's travel. I typically thread my struts very short in order to have stiffer spring rates when driving low due to personal preference.

The damper's used in the GD/GG air struts have about 5.5" of stroke front and rear. The 08+ (GR/GV/GE/GH) suspension has the same 5.5" stroke up front and about 2.5" for the rear shocks as they are incredibly short due to how Subaru re-designed the chassis to "optimize trunk space" by eliminating space consuming strut towers.

If you have any further questions feel free to PM, e-mail or call!

Cheers,
John
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Old 10-09-2013, 03:15 PM   #85
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Originally Posted by Bag Riders Air Ride View Post
Yes absolutely! If you thread the lower bracket downward on the strut body, you can configure your suspension for more lift. Of course, you will sacrifice drop, but that is to be expected and for you it doesn't seem like a big deal. Remember, air spring pressure = spring rate, so you don't just want to take the struts out of the box, install them, then ride around with an excessive amount of pressure in the bags. The correct method is to lengthen the struts by threading the bracket downward so that you can drive around at your desired height with an acceptable amount of pressure. Air Lift recommends around 50psi for a sporty ride. The damper's used in the GD/GG air struts have about 5.5" of stroke front and rear. The 08+ (GR/GV/GE/GH) suspension has the same 5.5" stroke up front and about 2.5" for the rear shocks as they are incredibly short.



That is true of ANY air suspension with an excessive amount of pressure in the air spring. The cause of course, is that you're riding in the very upper range of the damper's stroke, which results in the piston reaching the limit of its travel range while driving. Air Lift struts with threaded bodies allow you to mitigate this by lengthening the struts. This is the correct course of action if you desire to drive the vehicle lifted. You should always aim to be driving as close to mid-stroke as possible!

Any Idea on how "low" you can drop if you set the "normal" ride at stock or even 1/2- 1 inch higher?

I absolutely love the slammed car look but I ride "off pavement" way too much and would actually like a little more clearance. It would be amazing to be able to have a functioning car yet eliminate wheel gap for pictures.
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Old 10-14-2013, 07:54 AM   #86
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Any Idea on how "low" you can drop if you set the "normal" ride at stock or even 1/2- 1 inch higher?

I absolutely love the slammed car look but I ride "off pavement" way too much and would actually like a little more clearance. It would be amazing to be able to have a functioning car yet eliminate wheel gap for pictures.
For a newer chassis, the very short rear shock limits the amount of travel that can be achieved to just about 3". The front struts however have more like 5.5" of stroke, so you if you set up the front and rear suspension at mid-stroke which is ideal for driving, you could drop the front down roughly 2.25 inches and the rear down about an inch and a half.
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Old 10-15-2013, 01:42 AM   #87
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Do you guys have any suggestions for installers in NJ? Thinking about getting the new air lift v2 for my'13 STi but I'm not sure...coilovers or air?!?!!? Help!
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Old 10-15-2013, 08:10 AM   #88
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Do you guys have any suggestions for installers in NJ? Thinking about getting the new air lift v2 for my'13 STi but I'm not sure...coilovers or air?!?!!? Help!
Coilovers vs air ride... well I think I'm a little bit biased Honestly though, as an enthusiast, I enjoy driving low, having a sporty suspension, and the whole "stanced" look... but my WRX is my daily 24/7/365 and here in Vermont the roads can be pretty brutal. Being static low just got old after a while; not being able to get in driveways, rubbing my quarters with rear passengers, or telling people flat out "we're going to have to take the long way".

Air suspension offers the same sporty handling as high-end coil-overs, an even more impressive "stanced" look when parked, and I can lift my car at the push of a button when road conditions call for it. Yes, Air Suspension is more expensive than most coil-overs, but you get so much more and you can truly tune your air suspension to your driving style much easier than coil-overs (read: no swapping out springs!).

Regarding installers in New Jersey, I most often recommend our buddy Misha who is incredibly well known in the Volkswagen / Audi community for his air ride installs. He goes by the handle "rat4life" on the forums, and can be reached by e-mail at [email protected]. Misha has a Flickr account where he posts tons of pictures of his air ride installs for various customers, you can check it out here: http://www.flickr.com/photos/rat4life/

I hope that information helps! If you have any further questions please do not hesitate to post here, PM me, e-mail me ([email protected]) or give us a ring at 802 735 2574 (M-F 9am-5pm EST). We have everything for your '13 STi in stock as well, and we will gladly guarantee you the lowest price you will find on a kit
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Old 10-15-2013, 12:51 PM   #89
kooter2009
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Thanks a lot I think its definitely worth the extra money and as your ride is mine is also a daily driver...and I have an 8 month old so I'm sure she will enjoy the ride a little bit more...I'll be in touch is the air lift v2 as easy as they make it seem to set since I've read this thread with all the different psi settings seems overwhelming
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Old 10-15-2013, 02:16 PM   #90
Bag Riders Air Ride
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Thanks a lot I think its definitely worth the extra money and as your ride is mine is also a daily driver...and I have an 8 month old so I'm sure she will enjoy the ride a little bit more...I'll be in touch is the air lift v2 as easy as they make it seem to set since I've read this thread with all the different psi settings seems overwhelming
You're very welcome, I'm glad I could help! Air suspension is a very nice, comfortable ride, much more so than a firm coil-over. The V2 is extremely easy both to install, and use! PSI is very easy to understand once you get your hands on a controller and mess around with an air ride equipped vehicle. It is however, very important to understand that air spring pressure and the vehicle's height should never be used in comparison, as there are too many factors that will change the way pressure relates to the vehicle's height. Let me explain....

Take for example an air spring, supporting a mass of 500lbs, filled to 50psi. We will say that at 50psi, supporting 500lbs, the spring measures 5" tall. Now, if you were to increase the mass that the spring is supporting to say, 1000lbs, you will notice two changes:
  1. The spring will compress (become shorter) under the additional load, for example purposes lets say by 1".
  2. The pressure inside the spring will also increase under the additional load, for example purposes lets say to 75psi

So now you can see that by increasing the load on the spring, the spring not only becomes SHORTER, but the pressure inside the spring will INCREASE! This is where many people get confused: they will notice the increase in spring pressure, and believe the correct course of action would be to release pressure from the spring until the gauge reads "50psi" again. This would result in the spring compressing FURTHER, which if it were on your vehicle, may result in undesirable rubbing of your tires on your fenders.

I hope this example helps to demonstrate why spring pressure and spring height should never be compared without considering the weight that the spring is supporting
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Old 10-15-2013, 02:24 PM   #91
besthaticouldo
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Do you guys suggest running a SS line from the front struts to the rear? I've been debating SS lines along the inside of the frame rails to the back of the car where I'd go to the traditional plastic line because then it's away from road grime and stuff...

Any input from you guys?
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Old 10-15-2013, 03:57 PM   #92
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Originally Posted by besthaticouldo View Post
Do you guys suggest running a SS line from the front struts to the rear? I've been debating SS lines along the inside of the frame rails to the back of the car where I'd go to the traditional plastic line because then it's away from road grime and stuff...

Any input from you guys?
Nah, that would be a bit too pricey for me I recommend routing air line inside the vehicle, underneath the plastic trim along the door sills. This makes the air line very easy to access, away from road grime and surely out of harms way. I route braided leader lines from the front struts through the ABS grommet in the fender well and into the engine bay, where I then convert to traditional air line and pass through the main wiring harness grommet on the passenger's side of the firewall. On the cabin side of the firewall, the air line can then be pulled down from behind the glove box and into the trim of the vehicle, out of sight and super safe!
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Old 10-15-2013, 04:13 PM   #93
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I thought about inside, but I already have a bunch of audio wiring. Seems easier to replace if it's outside.

SS line can't be that expensive. Could just go baller and run some hardlines custom bent from the front to the back. LOL.
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Old 10-16-2013, 08:18 AM   #94
Bag Riders Air Ride
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Originally Posted by besthaticouldo View Post
I thought about inside, but I already have a bunch of audio wiring. Seems easier to replace if it's outside.

SS line can't be that expensive. Could just go baller and run some hardlines custom bent from the front to the back. LOL.
I guess it depends on if you're running 3/8 or 1/4" air line for space in the sills. Personally I have a 4AWG wire, an 8AWG wire and my Rocker Switch harness running through my driver side door sills (passing power wires through the grommet by the clutch pedal), whereas my front air lines (two 1/4" lines) run through my passenger side door sills with plenty of room to spare.

Remember, air line is meant to resist the elements! I typically only shroud line if it has to pass through a tight area where a bulkhead isn't an option, to protect against long-term abrasion. If you really want to shroud your air line, I would save yourself the hassle of tediously bending stainless or aluminium hard line and grab some stainless flex tubing for brake or fuel lines from Summit Racing (or your preferred parts supply store)

In regards to being a baller, I think fully polished hard line all around would be the greatest amount of baller-dom one can achieve with their air line plumbing
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Old 10-16-2013, 10:23 AM   #95
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I guess it depends on if you're running 3/8 or 1/4" air line for space in the sills. Personally I have a 4AWG wire, an 8AWG wire and my Rocker Switch harness running through my driver side door sills (passing power wires through the grommet by the clutch pedal), whereas my front air lines (two 1/4" lines) run through my passenger side door sills with plenty of room to spare.

Remember, air line is meant to resist the elements! I typically only shroud line if it has to pass through a tight area where a bulkhead isn't an option, to protect against long-term abrasion. If you really want to shroud your air line, I would save yourself the hassle of tediously bending stainless or aluminium hard line and grab some stainless flex tubing for brake or fuel lines from Summit Racing (or your preferred parts supply store)

In regards to being a baller, I think fully polished hard line all around would be the greatest amount of baller-dom one can achieve with their air line plumbing
That's what I was referring to actually. I may get a sleeve or something to go over the current line, just in case. With the snow and crap coming, it's the last thing I wanna deal with.

24 karat gold hard lines, now that's baller. Let me go start measuring. LOL not.
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Old 10-16-2013, 10:49 AM   #96
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BTW...since winter is coming up, can we discuss some winter prep?

I know air brake anti freeze (Like this stuff)

Anything else? I know drain the tank and traps more often...
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Old 10-18-2013, 09:22 AM   #97
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Originally Posted by besthaticouldo View Post
BTW...since winter is coming up, can we discuss some winter prep?

I know air brake anti freeze (Like this stuff)

Anything else? I know drain the tank and traps more often...
anyone? I know you BR guys drive your cars in the winter...lol
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Old 10-18-2013, 10:06 AM   #98
Bag Riders Air Ride
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Originally Posted by besthaticouldo View Post
BTW...since winter is coming up, can we discuss some winter prep?

I know air brake anti freeze (Like this stuff)

Anything else? I know drain the tank and traps more often...
That's about it! I put air brake anti-freeze in the tank every couple of months, but it really depends on how often you mess with your air ride. If you put anti freeze in the tank, then lift and lower the car a bunch of times (therefore exhausting air from the system) you will eventually run through the anti-freeze. Tanks tend to collect a bit more water in the winter since warm air from the compressor will condensate, freeze and then melt as the vehicle warms up.

I also put a bit of anti-freeze in any water traps in the system, to prevent water that collects in those from freezing which can cause blockage.

If you're running stock check valves on VIAIR pumps I strongly recommend upgrading to SMC check valves. They're a hell of a lot more burly, and I've yet to see one fail whereas I've been able to blow the wrong way through brand new VIAIR check valves. The larger SMC check valves are more resilient to ice clogs since the internal diaphragm is larger, and are just downright more reliable year-round.

You can see the 1/4" SMC Check Valves mounted directly to the compressor's head port in my setup:


Let me know if you have any further questions!

Best,
John
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Old 10-18-2013, 10:10 AM   #99
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Originally Posted by Bag Riders Air Ride View Post
That's about it! I put air brake anti-freeze in the tank every couple of months, but it really depends on how often you mess with your air ride. If you put anti freeze in the tank, then lift and lower the car a bunch of times (therefore exhausting air from the system) you will eventually run through the anti-freeze. Tanks tend to collect a bit more water in the winter since warm air from the compressor will condensate, freeze and then melt as the vehicle warms up.

I also put a bit of anti-freeze in any water traps in the system, to prevent water that collects in those from freezing which can cause blockage.

If you're running stock check valves on VIAIR pumps I strongly recommend upgrading to SMC check valves. They're a hell of a lot more burly, and I've yet to see one fail whereas I've been able to blow the wrong way through brand new VIAIR check valves. The larger SMC check valves are more resilient to ice clogs since the internal diaphragm is larger, and are just downright more reliable year-round.

You can see the 1/4" SMC Check Valves mounted directly to the compressor's head port in my setup:


Let me know if you have any further questions!

Best,
John
I can't see that picture John...

Are you talking about this?
http://bagriders.com/modlab/products...VALVE-KIT.html

I have the SMC water trap. I have it post compressor-pre tank. I have read a few differing opinions, some have em both postcompressor-pretank and posttank-preecu/manifold. What are your thoughts?
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Old 10-18-2013, 11:10 AM   #100
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Originally Posted by besthaticouldo View Post
I can't see that picture John...

Are you talking about this?
http://bagriders.com/modlab/products...VALVE-KIT.html

I have the SMC water trap. I have it post compressor-pre tank. I have read a few differing opinions, some have em both postcompressor-pretank and posttank-preecu/manifold. What are your thoughts?
Huh... weird.. are you behind a proxy server or something? It's hosted on Instagram's CDN. Regardless, yes that is what I'm talking about. The output on the compressor's head is 1/4" NPT so that will thread right in where the hose would otherwise go, then the hose can thread into the valve.

I've run a trap both pre and post tank. The argument for pre-tank (e.g., between pump and tank) is that the trap will filter out moisture from the air before it reaches the tank and therefore will reduce condensation. This is especially important for steel tanks, since condensation can cause little rust flakes to peel off from inside the tank and wreck havoc on your valves and small openings throughout the system.

Personally, I have my trap after the tank, between the tank and the manifold. Since I have aluminum tanks, I'm not concerned about rust flakes. When installing fittings with teflon tape, little bits of tape could separate inside the tank and when those enter the manifold, they can cause valves to get stuck or actuate poorly. Even with experience and the required tools, disassembling and cleaning a VU4 manifold isn't exactly the most fun thing to do after work or on a weekend. Given that the manifold is a mission-critical component for the rest of the system to operate, I want to limit the possibility of me having to remove it for cleaning, which is why I installed my water trap in a means which protects the manifold the most.

All in all, it is a common topic of debate, that's just my 2c! Hope it helps
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