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Old 05-22-2006, 10:57 PM   #26
DerFahrer
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2000 Legacy B4 RSK
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Power Steering??? C'mon guys!

Your crank/oil pump seals are leaking. It's not a hard fix. Just remove the timing belt of course, then remove the oil pump. Pop out the front crank seal while it's off, get a new O-ring for it, clean everything up, RTV the outer edge of the pump, put it back on, put a new crank seal on, and then move on to the cam seals (might as well while you're in there).

The cam seals won't leak from the front, they'll leak from behind the rear timing covers. If you see oil on the bottom of your heads, and it's not coming from the VC covers, then it's the cam seals.

It also has the possibility of being an oil pan leak.
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Old 05-23-2006, 12:04 AM   #27
Plays_With_toys
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Alrighty, I'll start going through the chiltons and figuring out how to attack this.

Will I need to remove the radiator to gain access to the timing belt stuff?

As for so many problems, from the service records the previous owner went to 4 shops. One was dealership, the rest were independent shops. One stated that her oil was overfilled. But the o ring has been replaced once already, and the front seal has been done several times. So I guess I'll just do it one more time. I think I'm going to replace the oil pan gasket as well, since the oil will be drained and everything anyway. Looks like my car will be out of commision for a few days while I tear into it.
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Old 05-23-2006, 12:17 AM   #28
avk
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I have plans to do an "expanded" timing belt service sometime this summer. From what I know, apart from the shaft seals, the leak can also be caused by loose screws holding the back cover of the oil pump, already mentioned, and by a casting flash partially blocking the 6 mm oil return hole in the engine block behind the pump.
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Old 05-23-2006, 12:26 AM   #29
Subietonic
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I would personally remove the radiator as you're likely going to have to get a big lever (read big-azzed pipe) on the crank pulley socket wrench. So there's no sense dinging up the radiator, or worse yet, putting a premature "hole" in it if the socket "slips" or you inadvertently drop something against it.

The other alternative is to fit a piece of plywood 1/4-3/8" between the radiator and the front of the engine to protect the radiator.

If you take the radiator out, it will give you an opportunity to drain/refill/burp the cooling system anyway, so it's all good.
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Old 05-23-2006, 10:22 AM   #30
RexyGirl
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Also make sure you replace the PCV valve...that's probably why the seals keep blowing out....also, stay away from crappy oil filters
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Old 05-23-2006, 04:58 PM   #31
DerFahrer
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If you want to do seals, you'll pretty much have to remove the radiator.

Loose screws on the backing plate of the oil pump won't cause a leak, but will cause a loss of oil pressure. I removed my oil pump at 149k and the screws were so tight I couldn't get them loose. I started to strip one of them out and I decided to just forget it and reinstall it.

Do realize that oil pan removal and replacement is WAY more daunting than it looks. You have to raise the engine up with a hoist or something similar, because the back bolts on the oil pan are inaccessible thanks to the crossmember.
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Old 05-23-2006, 05:43 PM   #32
Plays_With_toys
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Ok, I found the leak. Same picture as the previous page, but zoomed in on the two trouble spots. This seal (timing belt cover gasket?) has actually popped out in these two places. This has got to be the leak. I am reading up on timing belt replacement right now, I'm going to see if I can maybe loosen the bolts around this cover and then simply slip this seal back into place, if not I'll have to tear it apart and replace it.

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Old 05-23-2006, 06:45 PM   #33
ooberdoob
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you see, the leak is not the timing cover gasket, there should be no oil in there. it's more for dust and debris. the oil makes it swell and pop out.
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Old 05-23-2006, 08:43 PM   #34
Plays_With_toys
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Alright. Thanks for all the help guys! I now have an idea of where I'm going. So tomorrow I'm picking up:

crank seal
oil pump o-ring
camshaft oil seals (left and right)
***This part confused me, I am purchasing the front seals, correct? Its just that they leak from the backside of them?)
new timing belt
RTV sealant
silver sharpie/paint pen for marking timing
breaker bar (have needed one for a while anyway)
new timing belt cover seal


Now, any thing to watch out for or tips on removing the crankshaft pulley (I'll probably do the fifth gear, breaker bar with extension trick), or for the camshaft pulleys (chiltons says a large set of adjustable pliers will keep them from turning)? And what markings will the new timing belt have on it, and what will I have to figure out/transfer? Also, if you see something missing from my list let me know (besides the light weight perrin pulley that I should order before I start working on it).
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Old 05-23-2006, 09:10 PM   #35
DerFahrer
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What do you mean the backside of the cam seals? If you mean from behind the rear timing cover, behind the cam sprockets, then yes, that means the front seals are leaking. They typically leak in this area, as opposed to inside the timing cover.

The timing cover does not hold in any oil. You can run without timing cover seals if you want. In fact, you could run without timing covers!

You can use the starter trick to break the crank pulley bolt loose. Get an 22mm impact socket, put it on a 1/2" breaker bar, put a pipe extension on it, put this entire assembly on the bolt, and then turn it until it sits on the ground toward your right (driver's side of the car). Then hop in your car and pop the starter. Don't hold it, just pop it. That should break the bolt loose.

BEFORE you remove the old belt, break the bolts loose on the camshafts. That's the perfect way to hold the cams still while you break the bolts.

You don't need any Sharpie or other such instrument to mark timing. Identify the markings on the timing belt. Put the timing belt on (make sure it's facing the right direction! You should be able to read the lettering on it right-side-up when you install it), line the markings on the belt up with the notches on the sprockets, and you're good to go.

Don't forget, you have to recompress the tensioner! This is a delicate process. When you remove it, find an Allen wrench that will fit in the hole in the body and the hole in the piston. When you go to reinstall the tensioner, you need to put it in a vise and SLOWLY compress it! By slow, I mean it should take you at least 2 full minutes from the time you start compressing it until you slip the Allen wrench in it. If you compress it too quickly, you will ruin the hydraulics inside of it and you'll have to cough up about $75 for a new tensioner!

I think that's it. If I think of anything else, I'll post it.
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Old 05-23-2006, 11:02 PM   #36
scuzzy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subyluvr2212
When you go to reinstall the tensioner, you need to put it in a vise and SLOWLY compress it! By slow, I mean it should take you at least 2 full minutes from the time you start compressing it until you slip the Allen wrench in it. If you compress it too quickly, you will ruin the hydraulics inside of it and you'll have to cough up about $75 for a new tensioner!

I think that's it. If I think of anything else, I'll post it.
Double on the tensioner.

Depending on your vice or c-clamp, you may be able to do it like I did it. I used a c-clamp (requires a big c-clamp and lots of patience)

my compression speed was about a half a turn every ten seconds, it took about four to six minutes to compress it into the body. I essentially compressed it till I encountered more resistance than when I had first started turning.

you can go for it at a faster rate, but is six minutes worth $75 to you? it was to me.
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