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Old 10-22-2001, 05:37 AM   #1
Wrx0R
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Default warm up the car or not warm up?

well heres the deal, every morning b4 i go to class i warm up my car for about 3-5 mins, until the revs hit around 800 and the temp in the car is around the C marker. while it is warming up i usually take a cloth and wipe off the car everyday to keep it looking nice =P (but that is not to point sorry got to involved in the story)

so the qeustion i have for u is that, is it really necessary to warm up the car every morning b4 i head off, sometimes im late and dont really have time to do it.

i know that by warming up the car it is better for the car when you hit higher revs, but if you dont play to rev it (its early morning im not that crazy) and just cruise is it really necessary?

thx

wrx0r
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Old 10-22-2001, 06:10 AM   #2
ownly
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First thing, just make sure you have your iol changed when required...

warming for 3 to 5 minutes is not a good idea, especially if you are not going to drive the car for over 30 minutes and rev it madly to decarbonize it. the 3 to 5 minutes of idle will build wayyyyyy too much cabon in your motor.

i have an STi 6 with ~315hp and only wait about 20 seconds before leaving but i keep it under 4000rpm and without boost until it reaches regular running temperature. now 4000rpm is about the equivalent of 2800rpm in your car. so when you start it just wait a little, basically to make sure the oil will very easily circulate to the turbo without foaming and then drive it carefully without boost for a few minutes. after that youi can give it a good thrash.

also redlineing it at least once a day will keep it clean, i don't mean puch it and hold the rev-limiter with max boost like an idiot, just rev it slowly to the top a few times.
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Old 10-22-2001, 06:15 AM   #3
supermarkus
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Letting idle to warm up is probably a good idea if it's really cold where you live. If you don't have much time just drive but take it easy until the engine comes up to temp.
I recall in the manual to my Jeep, it recommended against idling to warm the car up.
If you can get away with taking it easy for the first part of your morning drive, idling is just a waste of gas. IMHO.

Oh, good point about carbon build up, these babies run rich!
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Old 10-22-2001, 07:36 AM   #4
Keiho
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Agree with the rest of these guys. Just start it up, wait a couple seconds and start driving but keeping the revs down low until the car is properly warmed up.

I've read something interesting before. Warming up the engine means the engine is warmed, but what about the rest of the components like the tranny?

Letting it warm up all together seems better to me.

Besides, BMW recommends their owners to start up the car and drive. So, I'll just do that.
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Old 10-22-2001, 08:27 AM   #5
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I like to let mine run for about 30 seconds, to make sure the oil is circulating to all the vital parts, then I just rev slowly and keep the RPM's below 3000 until the temp gauge shows normal temp. Then I let 'er rip!
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Old 10-22-2001, 08:31 AM   #6
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Wow good thread. I had no idea. I've been warming my car up for a few minutes pretty much every day! Cry! I thought I was doin her good!

-jb
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Old 10-22-2001, 09:41 AM   #7
Baluchitherium4
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Default tumble gen. valves

Aren't the tumble generator valves in operation until the engine gets to operating temperature?? Those valves cause the engine to be lean during warm up. That was my understanding.

Later,

Dale
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Old 10-22-2001, 09:51 AM   #8
TonyBurns
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Have to agree with Ownly, the only time you need to let your car run up is to get the oil round the engine, takes 15secs or so but i run mine 20-30secs before driving off (MY00 uk turbo with PPP) i then keep her under the 2500 mark until ive done about 5miles as to get the oil up to temp (DONT go of the water temp gauge as this isnt an accurate reading of the OIL!!)
Also remember to run the engine down after you have finished your drive, it needs both so the oil doesnt fry in the turbo, give it 2mins or buy a turbo timer that does it for you
Keep your car happy and it'll keep you happy and M3's at bay dont think the last one was impressed lol! beaten by a car with 71bhp less

Tony
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Old 10-22-2001, 10:11 AM   #9
chillN 2.5RS
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imo i think its good to have jucies flowing b4 u make any fast raming of the pistons. did that sound rite.

what i do is i got remote start. so when i get into range i start my car. get the oil flowing. and hop in and take off.

i seriously belive that the oil should get a chance to flow b4 u rev the engine any.

but the way cars are built u probly never tell if u do anything wrong.
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Old 10-22-2001, 10:19 AM   #10
Martin Ritchie
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Ditto what others have said. Only thing I would add is that I try to lightly depress brakes for a couple of seconds to "clean" rust/dust off the rotors while moving forward. Luckily I have a Stop sign a few hundred meters from my home that I can use to do this. If the rotors were wet overnight they often stick when you first start up.
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Old 10-22-2001, 10:42 AM   #11
HIHO
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Letting your car warm-up(idle) for more than a couple of seconds is unnecessary. It is harmful to let the car warm up to tickover. Oil does not flow well at idle so the car will be starved of lubrication for the 2-5 minutes of warming. Just get in start and drive. Do like everyone said and take it easy untill the car warms up. The same goes for the summer never leave the car running with AC on. It will do the same thing to the internals.
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Old 10-22-2001, 11:51 AM   #12
Bitor1
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I have always given the car a little gas right before shutting off the engine is this a bad idea? I usually blip the throttle to 3K then let it come back then immedietly shut off? btw I'm a NA 2.5

Wow I had no idea that it's not doing the car a lot of good to warm it up on idle but this all makes perfect sense! I have been wasting a lot time and probably undue wear on my engine and thinking I was doing the exact opposite!

Great Thread!
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Old 10-22-2001, 12:31 PM   #13
Streetman
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Bitor1-

Why blip? I'd just make sure you don't turn it off at 3K. 3K to zero very bad.

I have a few thoughts after reading this. First, does the RS have an automatic choke? Like my truck which normally idles about 500 rpms higher for a minute or two on colder days. I've always let it warm enough to finally drop to normal idle speed. I figure the RS would have something similar.

Another thing I thought while reading this-Don't you guys in colder climates use 5W-30 (or 40) in winter. As I understand it, it's the same weight but will flow more freely at cold temps. Wouldn't this help immensely in the first few seconds of a sub-freezing temperature day?

Question three is more of a thought. If you have a turbo timer, and a remote starter, this would completely insure you would never try to remotely start your car in gear, right? I think I found the guarantee I have been looking for.

And like many others, I've never considered the carbon build up issue. Apparently, this is really an issue. Perfect info that I can spew, along with my other ramblings of know it all factoids. Cliff Clavin's got nothin' on me!
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Old 10-22-2001, 12:42 PM   #14
HIHO
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The choke is controled by the computer system on board. It is refered to as tickover. That is where the idle drops to its normal 750-500 rpms.
Yes oil weight does help in cold starts. The problem is with a warm up at idle the oil presure stays low. The presure must build up to insure proper flow. If the oil does not flow well it will stay cold and thick. Remember circulation is key in keeping the oil at the right tempeture. If it does not than you will have cold oil setting in your oil pan.
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Old 10-22-2001, 12:44 PM   #15
Coati
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My experience comes from a '90 Corrado I bought new (and still have with 180k miles and an original $upercharger). In that car, conventional wisdom is this: nothing over 3000 rpms until _oil_ is brought up to normal running temps (ie, as others have mentioned, the water temp doesn't mean jack) or about ~200c. This can take as long as 10 minutes. VoA nicely gave us oil gauges to figure this one out, but unless you've added gauges on a scooby, I'd just go by the time.

This is because the bearing for the cars' $upercharger is oil-fed. Since the turbo in a WRX is spinning much faster, I'd think this was even more important with a scooby.

Your car will warm up much faster if you just drive it under 3k than for you to let it sit at idle for any extended period. Plus, you'll be
A) reducing the amount of emissions your car is putting out, making the world a better place; and
B) you'll get better gas mileage.

This may not be as applicable if you live in some arctic clime where battery and engine block warmers are in vogue
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Old 10-22-2001, 01:02 PM   #16
Stanley
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Quote:
Letting idle to warm up is probably a good idea if it's really cold where you live
Irvine isn't that cold
If it i that cold, you should get a block warmer...
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Old 10-22-2001, 01:09 PM   #17
subachad
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One thing I would like to add to the whole letting it warm up thing. The easiest way to blow a seal such as a headgasket is to boost before the car is warmed up. The oil has not had a chance to warm up and properly lube the motor. The gaskets are also hard and have yet to been soften up and therefore can be brittle. I learned this AFTER I sold my Talon Turbo thinking it was just a POS, turns out I just didn't know how to care for it.

Chad
93 1.8T
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Old 10-22-2001, 01:42 PM   #18
Wrx0R
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heheh thx for all the info guys, i was reading and then got confused, i live in irvine!! its not that cold here is it?

wow, but all the post that everyone did was great, alot of great info on how to take better care of my car, im never going to let it go idle for a couple of mins now!!

b4 after warming up the car a bit i would still keep the revs below 3.5k i feel sorry for her if i take it to high, but now ill do the same but just wonth warm up the car anymore, well for 30 secs around.

another question, what kind of synthetic oil is good for a the engine? like brand and type, so that it lubes the engine well.

some ppl said that i should follow the temp of the water when trying to determine the temp of the oil, since i dont have a oil gauge and never thought about buy one, how long should i drive the car easy b4 the temp of the oil should come up to the point where i can start reving my baby??

thx again for all the info, this helps alot

wrx0r
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Old 10-22-2001, 02:02 PM   #19
GooseMan
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Aaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhhh.......

All this talk is fine and dandy if its summer or if you live in the south. But what about for us cold climate people?

In winter, my windows get frozen on the INSIDE, almost EVERY MORNING!!! What am I supposed to do about that? I usually come into my car with its frozen windows, and wait like 5-10 min with the car idling, defrost on full blast, before I even have a little tiny hole to see thru. Pain in the ARSE! I'm always late for work in winter...

This is why I have a remote starter. I usually let the car run for like 5-10 mins before driving. Now, I read all the post above, which seem to make sense, so basically I've been killing my engine! ! What am I supposed to do????? Stupid winter....
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Old 10-22-2001, 02:14 PM   #20
Stanley
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I'd say a good rule of thumb is to wait at least three to five minutes of *driving* after your water temperature guage has reached a normal reading. If you are stuck in traffic or at lights, I'd wait a little longer.
I've gotten to the point where I *think* I can hear when the oil is getting up to temperature. When the car is cold, the turbo seems to whistle, even at low, gentle revs. When it is warmed up I don't hear much more than a whoosh...and that's only if I'm getting on it a bit.

As for synthetic oil - if you do a search you will find that this topic is debated ad nauseum and there are a lot of different opinions. I believe most opinions (maybe because it the one I hold?) point to the fact that synthetic, regardless of brand, is better. Better flow at cold temperatures and less tendency to burn (coke) in the turbo. I am putting Mobil One 5W-30 in my car at the next oil change (~10,000 miles) and use OEM filters. I am also debating replacing all of my transmission fluids with synthetic at that point as well.

I hope this helps...
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Old 10-22-2001, 02:35 PM   #21
Streetman
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Gooseman-

Get a power inverter, and a hairdryer. Blowdry hair in car while defrosting windows at the same time. Get to work on time.

OR, drive with head out window for a while. This probably won't be real good with wet hair, on a Canadian winter morning.
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Old 10-22-2001, 10:40 PM   #22
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don't forget to let your differential fluid reach operating temperature before going 100+ mph.

My suggestion for cold climates is to keep it out of overdrive (top gear) and that should keep the RPM's up a bit higher than normal. It shouldn't take more than a few miles before your engine gets around normal operating temps.

You could always use a car cover to keep the snow off of the car. That might help prevent the inside from frosting up too.
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Old 10-22-2001, 11:18 PM   #23
128d
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I have heard it is not necessary to "warm the turbo up" in Subarus, but I may be wrong.
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Old 10-23-2001, 12:12 AM   #24
jk147
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I usually let the car sit for 1 min or so and move wrx slowly until the water gauge comes up. I guess I should drive at least 5 miles / 10 minutes before letting her rip.
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Old 10-23-2001, 01:41 AM   #25
Wrx0R
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im not sure about the turbo having to warm up, but i do it anyways, dont want to damage the engine in anyway ya know.

wrx0r
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