Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Sunday September 21, 2014
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences Home Registration is free! Visit the NASIOC Store NASIOC Rules Search Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Calendar Archive NASIOC Upgrade Garage Logout
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Electrical & Lighting

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 02-09-2007, 07:46 AM   #1
dug-e-fresh
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 4568
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: 603 whp / EJ207
Vehicle:
10.7 @ 136, '02 WRX
??.? @ ???, '09 spec.B

Default Overall System Voltage Boosting... 14.4 -> 15-16 volts?

Ok, the first thought might be,... why is this in proven power bragging?

Well, I thought about the 2.0 forum, the 2.5 forum, the built motor forum.... and even the electrical/lighting forum... but in the end, I WANTED to post it in here.

I feel that there is a lot more "experimentation" from certain individuals in an attempt to make sick power.... and this could be something thats been done already... or something someone might try

So hear me out...

For any car making serious power... voltage is everything. It powers the injectors, the pump, and probably most importantly, the coils.

In theory if you increase system voltage you'd get more power to the pump which means more fuel to the engine and then more power to the coils means more spark to the cylinder (again, in theory).

Most of the time you hear about fuel pump voltage boosters... or hardwiring fuel pumps to get more flow... or we use grounding kits for "cleaner" more stable voltage... some people even get high out-put alternators or install audio caps into the cars... all in the name of more available system voltage.

So how do you get more voltage from your OEM alternator? Well, alternators a pretty neat devices... and vastly underutilized. With some tweaking, your run of the mill alternator will easily put out enough juice to power just about anything. From a fridge to a TV. Yep, a full 120+ volts... but its actually converted from AC to DC via the "rectifier bridge". Basically, it makes use of diodes that only allow current to flow one direction... essentially forcing the AC into becoming DC.

Regardless, thats a lot of current. Yet all we ask for them to make is 14-14.5 volts DC. But VERY easily we can "trick" them to make 15, 15.5 or even 16 volts with no resulting reliability issues (except maybe from the rest of the electrical system... I'll touch on that later).

So how do you do it? Well, the aternator has a device built in that samples system voltage, part of the voltage regulator... the regulator sends more voltage to increase the field current resulting in more alternator output or conversely decreases input voltage resulting in less alternator output.

From the factory it does this seamlessly and maintains a rather consistent overall system voltage.

But what if we intercept the voltage sample and alter it before the regulator gets it? Well, by doing that we can "trick" the alternator to do our bidding.

So... in the domestic world this is rather common and seemingly another one of those "old school" tricks.

Personally... I am seriously considering performing some sort of modification for say 1 extra volt. 15.5 volts total. The benefits are everywhere... brighter headlights, stronger quicker coils, more fuel, overall more voltage to power all those gauges and gadgets we all install.

The pitfall?? How much voltage it too much? Obviously we don't want to fry anything... however, we all know that OEM's build in an operating range. So... does anyone know what this is? I know in the GM world... they will take up to 16 volts before the ECU throws a code... and even still.. thats just a code... everything works fine, the ECU just THINKS something is wrong. And maybe... just maybe we'll be replacing headlight bulbs a little more often... meh, a say thats fine by me!!

Here are two production units for GM cars. They range from somewhat pricey/complicated to pretty damn cheap/simple. More than likely we could make our own from Radioshack for just a couple bucks. Sure, not exactly as elegant as below... but effective nonetheless!

A "complicated" one (still plug n play):

$75

A simple one:

$15

The simple one just plugs in. It takes like 15 seconds. Its available (and I have confirmed) in 0.7 and 1.4 voltage increases resulting in 15.2 volts and 15.9 volts (+/- 0.1 volts). Nice and steady. And everything WAS brighter... and NOTHING fried.

So... thoughts????

def
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
dug-e-fresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2007, 08:27 AM   #2
Mulder
Trust no one
Moderator
 
Member#: 11170
Join Date: Oct 2001
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: NYC
Vehicle:
02 WRX
15 WRX/05 GTO

Default

Have a feeling this will eventually be moved out of here, but anyway-
At 15.5V I would expect those "brighter" bulbs to burn out a lot sooner than they would otherwise as they will be operated outside their design voltage range. One of the symptoms of a failing regulator that allows the voltage to go too high is bulbs that burn out often.
The fuel pump in the turbo cars has an electronic controller so I don't know what you'd gain there. Also the ECU has internal voltage regulators that take the incoming system voltage and regulate it down to what the ECU needs, so a higher input would just be making those regulators work harder. In fact this would be true for every device in the car with an internal regulator- all the control modules, the HU/audio system and so on. The ignition coils are driven through the ECU not directly from the alternator/battery.
In short on a street car with a stock electrical system and OEM engine management, as long as the alternator and battery are in good shape and doing their job I don't believe this will do anything and there could well be reliability problems with lighting and electronics. Perhaps on a highly modded car with standalone EM it would be different.
Mulder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2007, 09:12 AM   #3
dug-e-fresh
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 4568
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: 603 whp / EJ207
Vehicle:
10.7 @ 136, '02 WRX
??.? @ ???, '09 spec.B

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mulder View Post
Have a feeling this will eventually be moved out of here, but anyway-
At 15.5V I would expect those "brighter" bulbs to burn out a lot sooner than they would otherwise as they will be operated outside their design voltage range. One of the symptoms of a failing regulator that allows the voltage to go too high is bulbs that burn out often.
The fuel pump in the turbo cars has an electronic controller so I don't know what you'd gain there. Also the ECU has internal voltage regulators that take the incoming system voltage and regulate it down to what the ECU needs, so a higher input would just be making those regulators work harder. In fact this would be true for every device in the car with an internal regulator- all the control modules, the HU/audio system and so on. The ignition coils are driven through the ECU not directly from the alternator/battery.
In short on a street car with a stock electrical system and OEM engine management, as long as the alternator and battery are in good shape and doing their job I don't believe this will do anything and there could well be reliability problems with lighting and electronics. Perhaps on a highly modded car with standalone EM it would be different.
Perhaps it will get moved... but IMO this was the best place for it.

As for the fuel pump controller... this is true, but again, quite a few people hard wire their fuel pumps, where indeed a benefit would occur.

As for the coils... you are saying the don't receive ANY voltage outside from what the ECU sends them? I thought the ECU controlled the grounds?

As for lighting... what voltage are the bulbs rated for? +/- what?

thanks for the response!

def
dug-e-fresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2007, 12:12 PM   #4
AZScoobie
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 8785
Join Date: Jul 2001
Chapter/Region: SWIC
Vehicle:
02 c_turner@ix.
netcom.com

Default

I would buy it for my car if I could go 1 volt. My car runs 13.2 most of the time Typical for a WRX. I dont see any downside to running 1 more volt. Going past 14.6 is risky and hard on parts. However you could run the higher one at the track. I have no doubt this will make power.



Clark
AZScoobie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2007, 12:21 PM   #5
CatfaceType-R
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 81102
Join Date: Feb 2005
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: I sell platinum cat jewelry.co
Default

would this help response in the drive by wire throttle?
CatfaceType-R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2007, 02:35 PM   #6
ride5000
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 32792
Join Date: Feb 2003
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: lincoln, ri
Vehicle:
2003 GGA MBP
12.9 / 105+

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by soon2bblackongold View Post
would this help response in the drive by wire throttle?
since the throttle is actuated by a stepper motor controlled by the ecu, i would say absolutely not. the ecu is peppered with voltage regulators.
ride5000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2007, 03:17 PM   #7
CatfaceType-R
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 81102
Join Date: Feb 2005
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: I sell platinum cat jewelry.co
Default

hmm....
CatfaceType-R is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2007, 03:34 AM   #8
hotrod
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 14141
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: 13.239@102.85 @ 5800 ft on 13T
Vehicle:
2002 Impreza WRX
e85forum.net

Default

It would be a mixed blessing sort of modification.

A higher supply voltage (as long as it was not excessive) would make life easier on the voltage regulators not harder. When you set up a voltage regulator it is very normal to have the supply side voltage significantly higher than the output side voltage. That way even if the supply side voltage dips some it is still higher than the intended output. Higher voltage carries the needed power at lower currents, so amperage is lower. This makes the quality of the grounds and wire resistance less of an issue.

The problem is that your system voltage will be limited to what the battery voltage is, as you raise the system voltage you can get to the point that you are over charging the battery. This usually happens if you hold the battery at 14.4 volts or more as that is when the battery starts out-gassing.

Your nominal battery voltage for a fully charged lead acid battery is 12.6 - 12.8 volts (power off, no current draw)
Any voltage supply to the battery higher than 2.15 volts per cell (12.9 volts on a 12v battery) will charge the battery as this is the minimum voltage to reverse the chemistry and store energy.

If you want to keep it on a float charge (low current trickle charge) you typically float the battery at about 13 -13.2 V, and normal cyclic charging can range from 13.2 - 14.4 volts. (most auto charging systems put out about 13.8 volts when charging). If you are doing an equalization charge (to pickup the battery voltage of a weak cell in the battery) you push the input voltage up to about 15-16 volts.

The Battery will act as a buffer so the actual system voltage will not significantly exceed about 13.8 volts even if the alternator is putting out a bit more, as the excess will provide charging current to the battery. The battery itself cannot deliver over 2.1 volts per cell under load, so your maximum system voltage under load tends to hover between the low limit of 12.6 volts of a fully charged battery and 13.8 volts typical of many alternators.

The way I would be inclined to implement something like that, is only have it set as a switchable setup for high power requirements, like when you want to be sure you ignition is giving maximum output while racing ect. (modern EFI systems can require over 100 watts of power under peak load for injectors, ignition and fuel pumps).

It would be interesting to try messing with that to see if it improves resistance to spark blowout under high boost etc.

My lead acid battery backup batteries for my Ham radio gear floats continuously at 13.03 Volts. I just replaced the batteries this year (they are deep cycle automotive lead acid batteries). The previous batteries lasted about 6 years at that charge level with occasional deep discharges during power outages.

If you wanted to go for absolute max performance you could try one of the 14-16 volt batteries, and bump the alternator output to match. I don't think I would do this on the street, but at the drag strip perhaps drop in the higher voltage battery (pre-charged to full charge, and switch to the higher alternator output).

http://www.turbostart.com/racing/16vRacing.htm
http://www.gzmotorsports.com/racing-alternators.html
http://www.rumblebee.com/volt-master.html
http://www.dragracingonline.com/tech...battery-1.html
http://www.batterycentralmall.com/Ba...V_Battery.html
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...04/ai_n9173023
http://www.powermastermotorsports.co...y_charger.html



Perhaps one of our hard core experimenters like Clark can try something like this on a car that is having ignition problems at high boost and see if it solves the problem. The down side of course is you could cook your coil on plug modules with extended use.

Some of the racers are running "3 post batteries" that have one 12V output post and one 16 volt output post. That allows them to wire certain accessories like the fuel pump and ignition to the 16V out put and all the other accessories like the head lights to 12V.


Larry

Last edited by hotrod; 02-10-2007 at 04:47 AM.
hotrod is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2007, 04:41 AM   #9
SaabTuner
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 67608
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: SoCal
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hotrod View Post
...My lead acid battery backup batteries for my Ham radio gear floats continuously at 13.03 Volts....
Larry
Heeeey, I always thought you'd probably be a fellow HAM'er. I haven't busted my HAM radio out in years. I really should get back into it one of these days. Handy things, HAM radios, and cheaper than cell phone contracts.
SaabTuner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2007, 08:09 AM   #10
dug-e-fresh
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 4568
Join Date: Mar 2001
Location: 603 whp / EJ207
Vehicle:
10.7 @ 136, '02 WRX
??.? @ ???, '09 spec.B

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hotrod View Post
It would be a mixed blessing sort of modification.

A higher supply voltage (as long as it was not excessive) would make life easier on the voltage regulators not harder. When you set up a voltage regulator it is very normal to have the supply side voltage significantly higher than the output side voltage. That way even if the supply side voltage dips some it is still higher than the intended output. Higher voltage carries the needed power at lower currents, so amperage is lower. This makes the quality of the grounds and wire resistance less of an issue.

The problem is that your system voltage will be limited to what the battery voltage is, as you raise the system voltage you can get to the point that you are over charging the battery. This usually happens if you hold the battery at 14.4 volts or more as that is when the battery starts out-gassing.

Your nominal battery voltage for a fully charged lead acid battery is 12.6 - 12.8 volts (power off, no current draw)
Any voltage supply to the battery higher than 2.15 volts per cell (12.9 volts on a 12v battery) will charge the battery as this is the minimum voltage to reverse the chemistry and store energy.

If you want to keep it on a float charge (low current trickle charge) you typically float the battery at about 13 -13.2 V, and normal cyclic charging can range from 13.2 - 14.4 volts. (most auto charging systems put out about 13.8 volts when charging). If you are doing an equalization charge (to pickup the battery voltage of a weak cell in the battery) you push the input voltage up to about 15-16 volts.

The Battery will act as a buffer so the actual system voltage will not significantly exceed about 13.8 volts even if the alternator is putting out a bit more, as the excess will provide charging current to the battery. The battery itself cannot deliver over 2.1 volts per cell under load, so your maximum system voltage under load tends to hover between the low limit of 12.6 volts of a fully charged battery and 13.8 volts typical of many alternators.

The way I would be inclined to implement something like that, is only have it set as a switchable setup for high power requirements, like when you want to be sure you ignition is giving maximum output while racing ect. (modern EFI systems can require over 100 watts of power under peak load for injectors, ignition and fuel pumps).

It would be interesting to try messing with that to see if it improves resistance to spark blowout under high boost etc.

My lead acid battery backup batteries for my Ham radio gear floats continuously at 13.03 Volts. I just replaced the batteries this year (they are deep cycle automotive lead acid batteries). The previous batteries lasted about 6 years at that charge level with occasional deep discharges during power outages.

If you wanted to go for absolute max performance you could try one of the 14-16 volt batteries, and bump the alternator output to match. I don't think I would do this on the street, but at the drag strip perhaps drop in the higher voltage battery (pre-charged to full charge, and switch to the higher alternator output).

http://www.turbostart.com/racing/16vRacing.htm
http://www.gzmotorsports.com/racing-alternators.html
http://www.rumblebee.com/volt-master.html
http://www.dragracingonline.com/tech...battery-1.html
http://www.batterycentralmall.com/Ba...V_Battery.html
http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...04/ai_n9173023
http://www.powermastermotorsports.co...y_charger.html



Perhaps one of our hard core experimenters like Clark can try something like this on a car that is having ignition problems at high boost and see if it solves the problem. The down side of course is you could cook your coil on plug modules with extended use.

Some of the racers are running "3 post batteries" that have one 12V output post and one 16 volt output post. That allows them to wire certain accessories like the fuel pump and ignition to the 16V out put and all the other accessories like the head lights to 12V.


Larry
Very good information...

As I digest this... I'll at least throw this out... the 1st unit by Casper Electronics is a throttle controlled unit that only increases voltage as you romp on the car... so more or less active only when racing.

def
dug-e-fresh is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-10-2007, 12:31 PM   #11
PaulRex
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 12454
Join Date: Nov 2001
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: Vermont
Vehicle:
10 Toyota Taco
K8 SV650SF

Default

What should someone do like myself who is using wrx alternator (2002 model)? Would upgrading to an STI alternator be a straightforward modification and of any benefit? I think its 80amps vs. 120amps. Amps is the measure of current, so that doesnt mean it nesc. changes the overall system voltage correct?

I believe all imprezas now have an uprated alternater but the older ones do not is this correct?

Last edited by PaulRex; 02-10-2007 at 12:38 PM.
PaulRex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 08:41 AM   #12
ride5000
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 32792
Join Date: Feb 2003
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: lincoln, ri
Vehicle:
2003 GGA MBP
12.9 / 105+

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hotrod View Post
A higher supply voltage (as long as it was not excessive) would make life easier on the voltage regulators not harder.
if we're talking about series-pass dc voltage regulators, then i must disagree. the power dissipated is proportional to the current flow (which should not change) times the voltage dropped across the regulator.

let's take something like the main feed for the ecu. i'm going to throw out a number like 13a steady state current draw. i'll also assume an internal voltage of 12vdc on the nose for the circuits. with a supply voltage of 13.5vdc, we lose 1.5vdc across the regulator. 1.5v*13a = 19.5w Pdiss. now we'll jack up the supply voltage to 14.5v. 2.5v*13a = 32.5 Pdiss. quite a bit more power in the form of heat must be thrown off the regulator to provide the steady 12vdc rail for the ecu.

even if my numbers are off, you can see the trend: the greater the difference in input vs. output voltage, the more power must be dissipated.

Quote:
When you set up a voltage regulator it is very normal to have the supply side voltage significantly higher than the output side voltage. That way even if the supply side voltage dips some it is still higher than the intended output.
agreed.

Quote:
Higher voltage carries the needed power at lower currents, so amperage is lower. This makes the quality of the grounds and wire resistance less of an issue.
agreed, BUT this also requires that the circuits be designed to support the voltage for current tradeoff. a switch mode power supply, for example, will draw half the current at double the input voltage. however, if you double the input voltage for a linear/transformer based power supply you'll probably let the smoke out..

i see no reason why the ecu would have a more complicated power supply than a bunch of integrated series pass regulators, ie the 7912, to provide a stable b+ rail. i suspect that the regulated +5vdc sensor supply rail is fed off of the already stepped down and filtered +12vdc rail as well, but that's pure conjecture. i'd have to see a schematic of the ecu, and i've never seen one of those!

Quote:
The problem is that your system voltage will be limited to what the battery voltage is, as you raise the system voltage you can get to the point that you are over charging the battery. This usually happens if you hold the battery at 14.4 volts or more as that is when the battery starts out-gassing.
agreed. the battery will likely not appreciate the constant overvoltage while the engine is turning.

Quote:
Some of the racers are running "3 post batteries" that have one 12V output post and one 16 volt output post. That allows them to wire certain accessories like the fuel pump and ignition to the 16V out put and all the other accessories like the head lights to 12V.
i think that's the best way to pursue it. the ignition coils are fed through fuses directly to b+, and grounded through the ecu drivers. you could easily wire those up to the higher supply voltage. like you accurately pointed out though, this WILL put extra stress on the coils, because you're asking them to do more work (strike a higher current, longer duration arc with a higher voltage).

ken
ride5000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 12:40 PM   #13
AZScoobie
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 8785
Join Date: Jul 2001
Chapter/Region: SWIC
Vehicle:
02 c_turner@ix.
netcom.com

Default

But the facts are.. Every other car I tune is well into the 14 volt range. Some up at 14.2. My Harley truck runs 14.4. Most subarus I tune are in the 12.8 to 13.2 range. They might hit 13.5 after a start but always drop down. I know this because everytime I tune a Subaru I must calculate the Voltage offset for the injectors. Most of them are down at 13.0 give or take 3 tenths. I would like the extra volt. To a coil pack and a G rotor fuel pump one volt is like you drinking 4 red bulls.. LOL.

I got some 4cx250B's that double in output with an extra 1kv on the plates! Explain that

Honestly though..I dont see a negative to going positive a volt.

The JDM STI alternator is reated higher.. I forget exactly but I think the factory vs JDM is a good 20 to 30 amps higher. This is on bugeye cars. I figured they did this because of the DCCD, and lighting. I am not sure on the later cars.
Clark
AZScoobie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 12:43 PM   #14
sspikey
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 32870
Join Date: Feb 2003
Default

Ur much better of regrounding with better cabling certain "important" electronics such a your fuel pump etc. 240s have a bad problem with that.
sspikey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 01:01 PM   #15
ride5000
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 32792
Join Date: Feb 2003
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: lincoln, ri
Vehicle:
2003 GGA MBP
12.9 / 105+

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by AZScoobie View Post
But the facts are.. Every other car I tune is well into the 14 volt range. Some up at 14.2. My Harley truck runs 14.4. Most subarus I tune are in the 12.8 to 13.2 range. They might hit 13.5 after a start but always drop down. I know this because everytime I tune a Subaru I must calculate the Voltage offset for the injectors. Most of them are down at 13.0 give or take 3 tenths. I would like the extra volt. To a coil pack and a G rotor fuel pump one volt is like you drinking 4 red bulls.. LOL.
oh yeah, i totally agree. one look at the specs for a walbro with different supply voltages made me a believer.

if your average car does supply a bit more juice from the alternator than your average subaru, then bumping up the alternator output voltage should be perfectly safe and reliable and would be beneficial.

i couldn't tell you because i've never monitored my subie's voltage--maybe i should?
ride5000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 01:22 PM   #16
Phatron
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 36033
Join Date: Apr 2003
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Tuning Lab
Vehicle:
CEO PhatBottiTuning
2006 STi GTX3582 + Meth

Default

Try one of these Sun Hyper Voltage Systems
They even sell low range, mid range and high range versions of the kit depending on where you want more power.

The voltage graph shows it picking up 1 volt in some spots.

http://www.hypervoltage.com/

Maybe Randyspeed or Gadiel can chime in on this. I dont think this was randyspeed's car but he might know if they got any dyno results with/without it and Gadiel tuned it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by randyspeed View Post
12.33 @112.1 WRX Wagon 2004 Silver
Modlist:
UTEC (Custom Tuned by Gadiel)
Header
Uppipe
Downpipe
Race Pipe
Cat Back
Blow Off
External Wastegate
VF39
Hyper Ground
Hyper Voltage
Greddy Profec B boost controller
USDM STI TMIC
injectors
255 Fuel Pump
17 "inch wheels BBS
Stock internals

Last edited by Phatron; 02-12-2007 at 01:30 PM.
Phatron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 01:51 PM   #17
AZScoobie
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 8785
Join Date: Jul 2001
Chapter/Region: SWIC
Vehicle:
02 c_turner@ix.
netcom.com

Default

I would like someone with a Hypervoltage box to measure the input and ouput voltage. This way we can tell if the thing is actualy increasing voltage or if this is a 1 farad cap in a box.

Clark
AZScoobie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 02:06 PM   #18
LastResort
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 99289
Join Date: Oct 2005
Default

I'm going to venture a guess that the hyper voltage system doesn't do anything perceptible. phrases like "acts as a capacitor" set off warning bells, that say "expensive capacitor"
LastResort is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 04:43 PM   #19
Mulder
Trust no one
Moderator
 
Member#: 11170
Join Date: Oct 2001
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: NYC
Vehicle:
02 WRX
15 WRX/05 GTO

Default

Interesting how it's always us hams who end up answering these questions.
I don't think the Hyper Voltage gizmo does anything beyond being a fancy (and expensive) grounding kit. You already have a very nice voltage stabilizer in the system by way of the battery and regulator, not likely that this thing can improve on that. You'll probably get similar results just by beefing up the existing wiring to eliminate voltage drop.
Mulder is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 04:48 PM   #20
bren wrx
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 59454
Join Date: Apr 2004
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Worcester
Vehicle:
'10 E92 M3 M-DCT
brentuning.com/blog

Default

i had one of those hyper voltages......it read the voltage on the front, no change over stock
bren wrx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 04:53 PM   #21
Phatron
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 36033
Join Date: Apr 2003
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Tuning Lab
Vehicle:
CEO PhatBottiTuning
2006 STi GTX3582 + Meth

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by LastResort View Post
I'm going to venture a guess that the hyper voltage system doesn't do anything perceptible. phrases like "acts as a capacitor" set off warning bells, that say "expensive capacitor"
Thats exactly what it is, a capacitor just stores energy

"The Hyper Voltage system helps significantly to reduce the load on the battery by storing engergy and releasing it back to the battery as needed to stabilize voltage"
Phatron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 04:56 PM   #22
LastResort
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 99289
Join Date: Oct 2005
Default

I understand what a capacitor is.
LastResort is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 05:01 PM   #23
Phatron
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 36033
Join Date: Apr 2003
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Tuning Lab
Vehicle:
CEO PhatBottiTuning
2006 STi GTX3582 + Meth

Default

I was just reiterating your point paparoach
Phatron is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 06:05 PM   #24
LastResort
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 99289
Join Date: Oct 2005
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Phatron View Post
I was just reiterating your point paparoach
Sorry, the coffee machine is broken, and no matter how much I yell at it, it won't work. I'm cranky.
LastResort is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2007, 06:43 PM   #25
Nick@JEPistons
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 133953
Join Date: Dec 2006
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Huntington Beach
Vehicle:
2002 WRX
Two Tone Green

Default

Lets try it. Im gonna throw my car on the dyno in a week. We can do a before and after. Im sure we will be able to see some numbers. Let me know, ill do a video and some pictures.

Thanks,

Nick
stealth-wrx
Nick@JEPistons is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Voltage jumps from 13.8 to 14.5 to 15.1!! Why?? 2slofouru Electrical & Lighting 14 08-21-2007 01:38 AM
4 8 15 16 23 42. ms3p Off-Topic 20 10-04-2006 06:02 PM
getting 14.4 volts szeny Car Audio, Video & Security 4 07-29-2005 08:59 PM
14 or 16 volt car battery question 949 Car Audio, Video & Security 2 07-06-2005 01:30 AM
Auto Show in Motion, Houston, 10-14,15,16,17 Tex-WReX Texas Impreza Club Forum -- TXIC 6 09-23-2004 04:36 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2014 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2014, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.