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Old 10-17-2008, 06:31 PM   #276
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Originally Posted by Verdugo View Post
Between these two, the first one I think is the best compositionally. I like the low angle and the angle of the car as well. Given how dark it was though, your only way to do this shot without a tripod is to maybe use the ground to stabilize it (don't be afraid to lie flat on your stomach) and/or raise your ISO to compensate and give you a faster shutter speed.

As for the second shot, I think the reason why it doesn't appeal to me as much is because the top of the photo is just a big empty sky, with artificial lighting reflecting off the cloud. To me personally it's just not very interesting.

Hope this helps!

Armin

thanks man. i actually did set the camera on the ground in the first shot. but i had moved it slightly when pushing the button. i havent played around with the ISO settings, but i need to sit down and get used to messing with those settings & learning how to control the shutter speed with the correct amount of light coming in.

photography isnt easy! i definitely give the up most respect to you guys that do this professionally.

as for the second pic, would it help to cut out the black sky and just leave the orange background? i wonder if i should do trimming & after photo editing to some of my work to get rid of the distractions. all the pics ive taken came straight from the camera. i dont have photoshop or anything.

thanks for the input bud.
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Old 10-17-2008, 06:40 PM   #277
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Originally Posted by SkimSTI View Post
thanks man. i actually did set the camera on the ground in the first shot. but i had moved it slightly when pushing the button. i havent played around with the ISO settings, but i need to sit down and get used to messing with those settings & learning how to control the shutter speed with the correct amount of light coming in.

photography isnt easy! i definitely give the up most respect to you guys that do this professionally.

as for the second pic, would it help to cut out the black sky and just leave the orange background? i wonder if i should do trimming & after photo editing to some of my work to get rid of the distractions. all the pics ive taken came straight from the camera. i dont have photoshop or anything.

thanks for the input bud.
-Skim
Don't be afraid to take multiple photos from the same angle if you suspect you have a blurry photo. That's the beauty of digital, after all

As for the second pic, yeah I'd probably crop it more so there was less black sky. The flag in the photo is a little bit of a distraction too.
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Old 10-18-2008, 08:27 PM   #278
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is the little tree over the hood a distraction?? opinions? bad thing about this pic is i had taken it when the sun was right over head (1pmish)




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Old 10-18-2008, 08:30 PM   #279
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IMO the distraction is the over-exposed rear and underexposed front. Of course, the wooden stakes don't help, but can be cloned out easily enough. Also, for me, this a "I couldn't make up my mind" angle, and a bit unflattering. Good lookin' car tho' .
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Old 10-19-2008, 10:37 AM   #280
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Just a quick question, but for the Circular Polarizer, how much should a good one cost? I bought a kit by Bower, that contained a CPL, a UV, and another filter, for about $25. Do the ones that cost 60-100 make a difference?
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Old 10-20-2008, 12:07 AM   #281
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is the little tree over the hood a distraction?? opinions? bad thing about this pic is i had taken it when the sun was right over head (1pmish)


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Originally Posted by UltimateLurker View Post
IMO the distraction is the over-exposed rear and underexposed front. Of course, the wooden stakes don't help, but can be cloned out easily enough. Also, for me, this a "I couldn't make up my mind" angle, and a bit unflattering. Good lookin' car tho' .
I agree with Andrew wholeheartedly here. I also think the location in general isn't all that great at all, just because the background isn't all that flattering for a car. If you're going to use that background, it'd probably be best to put more space between your car and the background, to hopefully get some background blur (also known as "bokeh").

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Just a quick question, but for the Circular Polarizer, how much should a good one cost? I bought a kit by Bower, that contained a CPL, a UV, and another filter, for about $25. Do the ones that cost 60-100 make a difference?
In my opinion, your choice of polarizer should match your choice of lens. If you've got your kit lens that generally isn't all that great, it makes no sense to get a super expensive filter for it. But, if you end up getting a pro lens, it likewise makes no sense to put a cheap piece of glass in front of it either. Side-by-side, there are HUGE differences in the overall quality of the fliter glass itself, along with the build quality as well. I used to have a green box Hoya circular polarizer for my old kit lens that cost $35. You could tell it was very cheaply made as it felt very flimsy. My friend had the same filter and he dropped it onto his carpeted floor and the whole filter completely disintegrated. Since I moved up to more expensive lenses, I only use B+W filters. There's no color cast from the glass, the glass is coated for better sharpness and contrast, and it's built as solid as a rock. You could say it's the Volk RE30 of circular polarizers

I use this same philosophy toward modifying cars, but that's a whole different story altogether
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Old 10-20-2008, 12:36 AM   #282
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Awesome thread guys - im looking at improving my auto photography skills and found all the info on here incredibly helpful - cant wait to get out there and have another shot at it!

I saw these pics on another forum, and was wondering how to get this kind of effect in a photo - it almost looks surreal but apparantly used next to no photoshop post processing...

Would love to be able to take photos like this..





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Old 10-20-2008, 12:43 AM   #283
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but apparantly used next to no photoshop post processing...
Ummmm yeah...I'm going to have to call BS on that. These photos were clearly taken with a set of strobe lights, and PS was definitely used to darken the surroundings of the cars (aka "edge burn") and to PS-out all the hot spots created by a set of strobe lights. PS is also responsible for the brownish hue as well. Whomever said they used next to no Photoshop post processing was lying through their teeth, or perhaps in the case of a forum post, through their fingers.
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Old 10-20-2008, 12:50 AM   #284
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Ummmm yeah...I'm going to have to call BS on that. These photos were clearly taken with a set of strobe lights, and PS was definitely used to darken the surroundings of the cars (aka "edge burn") and to PS-out all the hot spots created by a set of strobe lights. PS is also responsible for the brownish hue as well. Whomever said they used next to no Photoshop post processing was lying through their teeth, or perhaps in the case of a forum post, through their fingers.
Hey Armin - thanks for the response. The photographer mentioned "it was light painted with some very soft light, that's why it does look soft" and then said "Nope, virtually no Photoshop postprocessing involved."

Didnt think you could easily get that kind of effect without a little bit of 'assistance' :-)

Not trying to expose anyone here as a fraud or a liar, but just thought the pictures looked awesome so was curious as to how it was done.
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Old 10-20-2008, 01:05 AM   #285
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Hey Armin - thanks for the response. The photographer mentioned "it was light painted with some very soft light, that's why it does look soft" and then said "Nope, virtually no Photoshop postprocessing involved."

Didnt think you could easily get that kind of effect without a little bit of 'assistance' :-)

Not trying to expose anyone here as a fraud or a liar, but just thought the pictures looked awesome so was curious as to how it was done.
Looking at the EXIF info, it says the shot was taken at 81 seconds at f/11. If that's the case, then the photographer has a very very good light painting technique to achieve this, so my initial idea of using strobes was quite wrong. I stand corrected
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Old 10-20-2008, 01:09 AM   #286
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Looking at the EXIF info, it says the shot was taken at 81 seconds at f/11. If that's the case, then the photographer has a very very good light painting technique to achieve this, so my initial idea of using strobes was quite wrong. I stand corrected
What is a "light painting technique" - sounds to me like something you would do in photoshop?
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Old 10-20-2008, 01:38 AM   #287
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What is a "light painting technique" - sounds to me like something you would do in photoshop?
It's rather simple really. Set your camera on a tripod for a long shutter speed, then use a steady light (like a flash light, flood light, whatever) to go over the car (or whatever subject) back and forth throughout the duration while the shutter is open. Once the shutter closes, it'll look like the light has been painted onto the subject. It's not had to do, but you just have to be able to set your camera for the proper shutter speed, use the right aperture setting, ISO, and use a light source that won't be too bright.
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Old 10-20-2008, 11:05 AM   #288
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It's rather simple really. Set your camera on a tripod for a long shutter speed, then use a steady light (like a flash light, flood light, whatever) to go over the car (or whatever subject) back and forth throughout the duration while the shutter is open. Once the shutter closes, it'll look like the light has been painted onto the subject. It's not had to do, but you just have to be able to set your camera for the proper shutter speed, use the right aperture setting, ISO, and use a light source that won't be too bright.
damn, that's a really interesting idea...
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Old 10-20-2008, 06:48 PM   #289
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verdugo View Post
It's rather simple really. Set your camera on a tripod for a long shutter speed, then use a steady light (like a flash light, flood light, whatever) to go over the car (or whatever subject) back and forth throughout the duration while the shutter is open. Once the shutter closes, it'll look like the light has been painted onto the subject. It's not had to do, but you just have to be able to set your camera for the proper shutter speed, use the right aperture setting, ISO, and use a light source that won't be too bright.
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damn, that's a really interesting idea...
I saw a video that was a cool showroom photography using a strobe in a softbox being triggered by hand. I can't seem to find it right now, but when I do I'll post it up.
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Old 10-21-2008, 12:49 AM   #290
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I just read through this whole thread to see if there was much on pictures of interiors as that is the hardest for me to get, especially with black interiors. Great thread here, and I don't know why I hadn't read it all before. So here is the best that I've been able to get of the interior using just the interior lights. The inexpensive but flexible Fuji S700 somewhat limits me in some ways, but I'm trying to find ways to work around it. Any lighting tips? Would a filter help out with the reflections I'm getting off of the leather? The gauges and center stack are really light green, but they are purple from chromatic abberations (looks better purple and aqua though).

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Old 10-21-2008, 12:54 AM   #291
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Couple of night time interior shots I took of my car the other night. Basically had the camera on auto-night mode.. no manual settings adjusted, and this was without a tripod too, just used the seat for stability..

Most of the dash etc is quite dark, which was the effect I was going for - wanted to show off the illumination of the gauges



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Old 10-21-2008, 01:30 AM   #292
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That's the big part of difficulty to be able to see the interior of the car without the gauges being blown out. I guess I should try an HDR, but my camera will only bracket a max of +/-1EV. I believe my pictures were taken 4 seconds, f3.5, ISO200.
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Old 10-21-2008, 06:16 PM   #293
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I just read through this whole thread to see if there was much on pictures of interiors as that is the hardest for me to get, especially with black interiors. Great thread here, and I don't know why I hadn't read it all before. So here is the best that I've been able to get of the interior using just the interior lights. The inexpensive but flexible Fuji S700 somewhat limits me in some ways, but I'm trying to find ways to work around it. Any lighting tips? Would a filter help out with the reflections I'm getting off of the leather? The gauges and center stack are really light green, but they are purple from chromatic abberations (looks better purple and aqua though).

Interiors are tough because since it is an interior, you lose a lot of light from the outside. That said, you can use a flash to bounce light off the ceiling, and use the seats to help stabilize your camera. Using a higher f-stop (like f/8) will help keep the gauges from blowing out, but you'll need to make sure you use a flash or adjust your ISO accordingly to keep the shutter speed managable. And yes, a circular polarizing filter will help with those reflections. Here's some examples of my own:











Quote:
Originally Posted by PPower View Post
That's the big part of difficulty to be able to see the interior of the car without the gauges being blown out. I guess I should try an HDR, but my camera will only bracket a max of +/-1EV. I believe my pictures were taken 4 seconds, f3.5, ISO200.
Don't think HDR will solve this problem either. All you need a is a higher f-stop to cut down on the amount of light coming in, with a compensated shutter speed to make up for it.
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Old 10-21-2008, 06:41 PM   #294
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Oh man, this one gets me every time.
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Old 10-21-2008, 10:15 PM   #295
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damn....def some nice pics
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Old 10-21-2008, 11:19 PM   #296
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Interiors are tough because since it is an interior, you lose a lot of light from the outside. That said, you can use a flash to bounce light off the ceiling, and use the seats to help stabilize your camera. Using a higher f-stop (like f/8) will help keep the gauges from blowing out, but you'll need to make sure you use a flash or adjust your ISO accordingly to keep the shutter speed managable. And yes, a circular polarizing filter will help with those reflections.

Don't think HDR will solve this problem either. All you need a is a higher f-stop to cut down on the amount of light coming in, with a compensated shutter speed to make up for it.
Using the higher f-stop doesn't work because you just have to use a longer shutter speed to get the same quantity of light in. I guess I'm kinda thinking "out loud" with posting this up here as I work through trying to get the right lighting. the problem is that for it to be dark enough to see the gauge lights, you either expose the gauges or the interior, but never really both which is why I have erred on the side of seeing the interior. HDR is really a way of getting areas of contrasting light metering to show up in the same picture, so that is why I thought I should give it a shot sometime.

I think that I need to either take the pictures with the doors open like your last picture with just the perfect amount of natural light (sunset?) outside. Aside from that, I'm thinking that 1) the black interior is much, much more difficult to shoot than a tan interior (picture below) and 2) some interior light bulbs are just brighter than mine. Oh, and 3) I need better equipment. Here's my inspiration that got me trying to get even semi-close.

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q...z/Interior.jpg
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Old 10-22-2008, 02:18 PM   #297
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Using the higher f-stop doesn't work because you just have to use a longer shutter speed to get the same quantity of light in. I guess I'm kinda thinking "out loud" with posting this up here as I work through trying to get the right lighting. the problem is that for it to be dark enough to see the gauge lights, you either expose the gauges or the interior, but never really both which is why I have erred on the side of seeing the interior. HDR is really a way of getting areas of contrasting light metering to show up in the same picture, so that is why I thought I should give it a shot sometime.

I think that I need to either take the pictures with the doors open like your last picture with just the perfect amount of natural light (sunset?) outside. Aside from that, I'm thinking that 1) the black interior is much, much more difficult to shoot than a tan interior (picture below) and 2) some interior light bulbs are just brighter than mine. Oh, and 3) I need better equipment. Here's my inspiration that got me trying to get even semi-close.

http://i138.photobucket.com/albums/q...z/Interior.jpg
Equipment tends to have more bearing on low-light photography than when just shooting in the daytime. Take a D300 for example, or Canon's new 5D Mark II...both have ridiculously awesome high ISO capabilities so you really can shoot at say f/8 and use a faster shutter speed at ISO 1600 and still have relatively little to no noise. The other way is to simply set up a tripod outside the car, or use parts of the interior to give you stability. The gauge pic above that Andrew loves so much (thanks dude! ) was taken with a 1/2 second shutter speed. I propped myself onto the dash with my elbows and it took a few shots to get one nice and sharp like that.

Also, the problem with taking a proper HDR photo is that you NEED to have the camera on a tripod or at least something where the camera won't move between the bracketed shots. When shooting interiors, that's not always a viable option.

Here's an example of a high ISO shot I took handheld at Hot Import Nights. My D200's noise is low compared to a lot of cameras, but it's nowhere near as good as the D300/D3/D700 or Canon's 5D MkII and such:



Photo info:

Shutter Speed: 1/40 sec
Aperture: f/2.8
ISO: 800
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Old 10-22-2008, 02:56 PM   #298
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Old 10-22-2008, 06:18 PM   #299
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novarex, I'm guessing you increased the contrast a bit (?) but it brings out the noise at the same time. At least it doesn't look as much like there's an opaque filter over it.

Armin, I use a tripod for most of my pics, but especially interior shots. I haven't had a problem with setting it up on the rear seat. I just adjust the feet until my bubble says I'm level. It's a must with my camera.
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Old 10-22-2008, 07:53 PM   #300
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hi..this is my first post so i thought id introduce myself
my friend told me about this thread so i thought id post in it and get some advice. my name is charles and i am 17 and live in payette idaho, population 7000 i have a nikon d200 with a 70 200, and 18 200. i drive an isuzu i mark turbo. i really havent dont many car pics so this is what i have to share.







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