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Old 02-08-2002, 01:55 AM   #26
zemmo
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I think I'd be trading improved performance at low temperatures for somewhat less hi-temp protection. The owner's manual says that 80W is good to 85 degrees F, and that's all we ever get. On the other hand, when it's really cold I expect the bearings will get lubricated better, and the synchros work more quickly. It's pretty pathetic how the shift-lever feels like it's moving thru molasses when it's cold, can't be doing the trans any good.
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Old 02-08-2002, 11:14 AM   #27
ANZAC_1915
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Looking at the owner's manual, 75W90 has the widest temp coverage.

Quote:
improved performance
I think any gains you'll get are minimal/immeasureable.
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Old 02-08-2002, 01:44 PM   #28
zemmo
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Of course the 75W90 has the widest coverage. But I don't need the upper end, the 75W80 fits my particular demands the most closely.

I don't expect any gigantic gains, although I expect they might very well be measurable, and perhaps even discernible. It's just fun, trying to get the best product for a particular application. And I haven't been crazy about the way the synchros work with the products I've tried so far...
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Old 02-09-2002, 07:06 PM   #29
jhonas
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I have just one question, why choose 75w90 over 75w90ns for the rear differential? I'm thinking I'll just go 75w90ns all around, unless anyone can give me a reason not too.

Thanks,
Matt
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Old 02-09-2002, 09:55 PM   #30
Mulder
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The 75W90 contains added friction modifiers which are beneficial for gears and bearings but also make the fluid too slippery for proper synchro operation.
You can use either the 75W90 or NS in the diff with no problem, both are GL-5 spec.
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Old 02-09-2002, 11:25 PM   #31
zemmo
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If you look at the .pdf tech sheet on the Redline site you'll notice that the NS is quite a bit lower in viscosity at low temps. The friction modifiers apparently increase the viscosity somewhat. But if that's not a consideration, the slippier 75W90 would theoretically offer better protection. Splitting hairs, for sure, either one should be great.
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Old 02-11-2002, 10:01 PM   #32
ANZAC_1915
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I think Redline mentions the 75W90 offers more protection for hypoid bevel type ring & pinions than the NS. Agreed it is splitting hairs.
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Old 02-17-2002, 04:11 AM   #33
TaiChih
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I mixed mine with 2 quarts MT-90 and 1.7 qts of super lightweight shockproof gear oil.
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