Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Friday August 1, 2014
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences Home Registration is free! Visit the NASIOC Store NASIOC Rules Search Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Calendar Archive NASIOC Upgrade Garage Logout
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC General > News & Rumors > Non-Subaru News & Rumors

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-24-2008, 01:03 PM   #1
AVANTI R5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 73805
Join Date: Nov 2004
Default New technology charges hybrid batteries during driving

Quote:
Greenwich, Connecticut - U.S.-based Electric Truck LLC has optioned exclusive commercial rights to a technology developed by Tufts University in Boston that can recharge the batteries of any hybrid-electric or electric-powered vehicle while it is being driven.


The technology could increase the miles per gallon or total driving range performance of hybrid or electric cars by 20 to 70 per cent, the company said. The cost-effective invention harnesses the vehicle’s movement to generate electricity, which is used to continually recharge the battery while the vehicle is in motion.


Since the technology uses the vehicle’s weight for energy recovery, the company said it could help speed the expansion of the hybrid and battery electric vehicle market to vehicles of greater size, weight and payload, including SUVs, pickup and delivery trucks, mail trucks, school and city buses, and other light- and medium-duty trucks. These vehicles represent a large market segment based on commercial need, as well as some of the largest sources of emissions.


The technology was developed more than a decade ago by Tufts engineering progressor emeritus Ronald Goldner and colleague Peter Zerigian within the university’s School of Engineering, and received additional support in subsequent years from Argonne National Laboratory.


http://www.canadiandriver.com/thenew...ng-driving.htm
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
AVANTI R5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-24-2008, 01:54 PM   #2
Hazdaz
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 14611
Join Date: Jan 2002
Default

So no real details as to how it works then? Interesting none the less... since the article mentions the vehicles weight, I assume it uses inertia to somehow charge the batteries.
Hazdaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 07:02 PM   #3
ilara72
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 24047
Join Date: Sep 2002
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Southern California
Vehicle:
2009 STI
2002 WRX

Default

Something about no perpetual motion machines comes to mind.

This sounds like the same regenerative braking. My radio control car had that like almost 15 years ago.
ilara72 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 07:09 PM   #4
Chromer
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 20325
Join Date: Jun 2002
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Vehicle:
08 Yamaha WR250R
07 Suzuki DL650

Default

It recovers energy from the fluid in the struts. Instead of just letting all that energy from fluid being squeezed through the valving be dissipated as heat, it recovers some of it via a hydraulic motor instead. I saw a much better article on this a few days ago, let me see if I can find it...
Chromer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 11:33 PM   #5
sniper1rfa
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 141040
Join Date: Feb 2007
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Designing things
Vehicle:
07 2.5i wagon
UGM

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chromer View Post
It recovers energy from the fluid in the struts. Instead of just letting all that energy from fluid being squeezed through the valving be dissipated as heat, it recovers some of it via a hydraulic motor instead. I saw a much better article on this a few days ago, let me see if I can find it...
Please do, that sounds interesting (and legitimately viable, although i can't see the gains being too impressive).
sniper1rfa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-25-2008, 11:49 PM   #6
Chromer
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 20325
Join Date: Jun 2002
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Vehicle:
08 Yamaha WR250R
07 Suzuki DL650

Default

Here we go...

Electric Truck Exclusively Options Regenerative Magnetic Shock Absorber Technology from Tufts

Quote:
At the SAE Government/Industry Meeting in Washington in 2001, Goldner, Zerigian and J.R. Hull from Argonne presented a paper estimating that the percentage of recoverable power/energy for a 2,500 lb vehicle that employs four optimized design regenerative magnetic shock absorbers and whose average speed is 20 meters/s (45 mph) on a typical US highway is likely to be between 20% and 70%.

The shock absorber uses an electromagnetic linear generator to convert variable frequency, repetitive intermittent linear displacement motion to useful electrical power. The Goldner device uses superposition of radial components of the magnetic flux density from a plurality of adjacent magnets to produce a maximum average radial magnetic flux density within a coil winding array.
Quote:
In their patent filing, the inventors claim that the regenerative electromagnetic shock absorber system is capable of peak power generating capacity of between about 2 to 17 kW, average power generating capacity ranging from about 1 to 6 kW, and power contribution efficiencies ranging from 8-44% for passenger vehicles traveling at relatively moderate speeds on typical roads encountered under normal urban driving conditions.

For rough roads with bump slopes as high as 0.10 and displacement velocities greater than 1.0 m/s, they claim that the system may generate nearly 50 kW of peak power and nearly 16 kW of average power with a power contribution efficiency approaching 70%.
Now at a guess, they're talking about recovering 20-70% of the power normally dissipated by the shock absorbers...
Chromer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2008, 12:32 AM   #7
Skunkers
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 115480
Join Date: May 2006
Location: St. Pete, FL
Vehicle:
2002 RSX-S
Desert Silver

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chromer View Post
Here we go...

Electric Truck Exclusively Options Regenerative Magnetic Shock Absorber Technology from Tufts

Now at a guess, they're talking about recovering 20-70% of the power normally dissipated by the shock absorbers...
Whoa! That's awesome!
Skunkers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2008, 12:49 AM   #8
Lantec
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 48685
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Coquitlam, B.C.
Vehicle:
2010 Prius
Silver

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chromer View Post
Here we go...

Electric Truck Exclusively Options Regenerative Magnetic Shock Absorber Technology from Tufts





Now at a guess, they're talking about recovering 20-70% of the power normally dissipated by the shock absorbers...
Sweet! It's sorta like what they're doing with wave power on the shores. The waves move around this tube thing and absorb the energy from the waves to make electricity.

I wonder if it'll smooth out the ride too like it does with smoothing out the waves.
Lantec is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2008, 01:58 AM   #9
EtoS
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 102238
Join Date: Dec 2005
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: I'm lost in Trenton
Vehicle:
08 DGM STi
*RIP* 06 WRX TR

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lantec View Post
Sweet! It's sorta like what they're doing with wave power on the shores. The waves move around this tube thing and absorb the energy from the waves to make electricity.

I wonder if it'll smooth out the ride too like it does with smoothing out the waves.
Wave Motion Luxury Suspension- coming to an escalade near you
EtoS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2008, 03:11 AM   #10
Chuck Jones
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 153449
Join Date: Jul 2007
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Peterborough, NH/Woo, MA
Vehicle:
2008 WRB w/ moreRPF1
Replaced East Coaster

Default

And I thought the magnetic ride system in GM vehicles was out there. This would be amazing and improve their highway mileage, where they have never been at their best. Just take the bumpy road.
Chuck Jones is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2008, 09:00 AM   #11
Hazdaz
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 14611
Join Date: Jan 2002
Default

That's freakin' brilliant.

I just hope for the love of god that this is not one of them technologies that gets patented/bought out by some company that then never does anything with the technology due to lack of resources/clout.



Of course the cynic in me says that DOT departments across the country are now going to slash their pothole repair budgets as a "favor" to the people that will own cars with this technology.
Hazdaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2008, 10:55 AM   #12
taylormade
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 81157
Join Date: Feb 2005
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Teh Mountain State
Default

Can anyone give an estimate as to how much energy is actually available (I know road conditions, driving style etc will play a part) to recover? 1kWh? 10kWh?
taylormade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2008, 11:21 AM   #13
sniper1rfa
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 141040
Join Date: Feb 2007
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Designing things
Vehicle:
07 2.5i wagon
UGM

Default

they are saying 1-6 kW, but i think that's a bit optimistic.

And it's kW, not kWh, since the hours bit depends on how long you drive for.
sniper1rfa is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Audi Drive Select Wins Ajac’s 2010 Best New Technology Award AVANTI R5 Non-Subaru News & Rumors 1 02-16-2010 12:16 PM
how long does it take to charge the battery? bnr34rb26dett Newbies & FAQs 6 02-08-2009 08:46 PM
How much idling should it take to charge a battery? Mike Wevrick Service & Maintenance 7 10-31-2007 03:18 PM
How long to charge a battery? Lachlan Electrical & Lighting 5 11-03-2005 05:09 PM
Charging dead battery... hampster Electrical & Lighting 9 04-08-2004 03:52 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2014 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2014, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.