Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Wednesday September 17, 2014
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences Home Registration is free! Visit the NASIOC Store NASIOC Rules Search Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Calendar Archive NASIOC Upgrade Garage Logout
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Normally Aspirated Powertrain

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-08-2009, 08:36 PM   #1
g-rider
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 181037
Join Date: May 2008
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: Northern California
Vehicle:
1997 BrightonRS
Red

Question Seafoam on a 173k ej18?

Good idea or no? I'm sure it's never been done on the car. I want to, but i'm nervous because of the high mileage.

I've searched and found a great deal on it, but I'm still not sure on mileage, or what vac line to feed through... Since the Brake Booster only hits the passenger side cylinders, and i dont have a turbo, so no BPV... where would it go besides the gas tank and crankcase?

Any help is appreciated.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
g-rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 12:57 PM   #2
g-rider
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 181037
Join Date: May 2008
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: Northern California
Vehicle:
1997 BrightonRS
Red

Default

I think ppl are waiting to laugh at me. So, I'm just going to leave it as a bad idea, and try it when my motor finally decides to not move anymore.
g-rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 02:52 PM   #3
jordan s
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 122233
Join Date: Aug 2006
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: north jersey
Vehicle:
1997 Legacy GT
Aspen White 5MT

Default

i don't see why it would be a bad idea........
jordan s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 03:08 PM   #4
HeftyJo
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 198984
Join Date: Jan 2009
Chapter/Region: TXIC
Location: Dallas, TX
Vehicle:
2005 2.5RS
Blue

Default

I just checked out the Seafoam promotional video on Google Video. It appears that you just need some type of access into the intake while the engine is running. For a carburated engine this is easy since you just pull the air cleaner cover and pour it down the venturi body. For a fuel infected engine though it is tricky to just pour it down into the throttle body -- especially when it points to the firewall. So, just look for a vacuum line that goes straight into the intake manifold or throttle body and use a funnel or spigot to pour the seafoam in while the engine is running. If that is too much hassle then you can probably do just as well pouring it into the gas tank.

I usually use a product called RxP to decarbon my engine through the fuel system. To remove build up and sludge in the crankcase I'd use Auto-Rx instead of Seafoam.

It seems that usually the guys with the Euro cars swear by Seafoam. They always talk about "smokin' the engine out". Granted BMW engines have some fairly tight tolerances and are well blue printed and balanced. So, buildup on the piston tops can throw things off over time. In theory any engine should benefit from a de-carbon treatment but some more so than others. If you are having problems passing inspection due to emissions issues then RxP or Seafoam is definitely worth a try.
HeftyJo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 08:24 PM   #5
g-rider
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 181037
Join Date: May 2008
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: Northern California
Vehicle:
1997 BrightonRS
Red

Default

thanks for the replies. I'm still considering it, but i have a feeling there is a ridiculous amount of build up in the engine. And i've seen people warn against seafoaming a high mileage car, but no reason why...
g-rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 09:00 PM   #6
Matt Monson
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 832
Join Date: Jan 2000
Chapter/Region: RMIC
Location: Teh Ghetto Garage, CO
Vehicle:
99 2.5RS, '85 911
'73 914 and 2012 BRZ

Default

The reason they warn against it is the same reason people warn against switching to synthetic oil on a high mileage engine. Once it's cleaned out and the build up is removed there's a chance that the engine will develop oil leaks. Oftentimes, on an old high mileage engine, leaky seals get a little help from all the deposits on them. Once they are gone, leaks start. Then you are put in a position where you have to disassemble major components and replace seals.

Personally, I think the smart thing to do is just drive the car as is unless it needs maintenance. My '93 has 190k mi on it's original engine. It's recently gotten some leaks and when I go to do the timing belt in the coming months, I will pull the engine and do oil pump, camshaft, crank, and oil seperator plate seals at the same time. However, not everyone is in the position where they can just yank the engine and do such a major service. You've got to make your own decisions based on your skill level, needs, and financial position.

I will say that there are guys over on Legacy Central (the 1990-1994 era cars) forums who swear by the seafoam treatment. Even though your car is marginally different, you might go over there to the engine forum and search for threads about it. I am sure you will find details of how to go through the process and how best to introduce it to your intake.
Matt Monson is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-09-2009, 09:30 PM   #7
g-rider
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 181037
Join Date: May 2008
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: Northern California
Vehicle:
1997 BrightonRS
Red

Default

hmmm... well, i just re-sealed the oil pump and front main seal... now the car seems to hold its fluids perfectly well. I think i may give this a try.
g-rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2009, 01:25 PM   #8
kami333
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 22068
Join Date: Jul 2002
Chapter/Region: RMIC
Location: SLC, UT
Vehicle:
00 GF4, 00 GM6
93 GF2

Default

I've seafoamed my 134k ej22 and 198k ej18 engines, no problems. I switched them to synthetic too I use 1/3 in the gas tank, 1/3 into the oil, and pour 1/3 through the PCV valve, then change the oil the next day.
kami333 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 12:15 AM   #9
g-rider
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 181037
Join Date: May 2008
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: Northern California
Vehicle:
1997 BrightonRS
Red

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kami333 View Post
I've seafoamed my 134k ej22 and 198k ej18 engines, no problems. I switched them to synthetic too I use 1/3 in the gas tank, 1/3 into the oil, and pour 1/3 through the PCV valve, then change the oil the next day.
beautiful... i never thought of the PCV valve. thanks for the tip. I'll let you all know how it works out.
g-rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 12:46 AM   #10
jordan s
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 122233
Join Date: Aug 2006
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: north jersey
Vehicle:
1997 Legacy GT
Aspen White 5MT

Default

i want to seafoam my car badly since i'm nearing 50,000 miles and i've read countless instructions on how to do it, but i have no idea what a PCV valve is so they're all useless. can someone explain or better yet post a picture of the PCV valve? sorry if i'm retarded for not knowing.
jordan s is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2009, 10:18 PM   #11
clokwork
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 180082
Join Date: May 2008
Default

I used seafoam at approximately 120k and I went through the gas tank to avoid the hassle. To be honest, I didn't notice any increase in gas mileage or driveability. I do hope it took out some deposits on it's way out though. I did notice that for a few weeks though I actually lost gas mileage but went back to normal.
clokwork is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 02:05 AM   #12
XanRules
NASIOC Supporter
 
Member#: 157348
Join Date: Aug 2007
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Benghazi
Vehicle:
1996 JNCO Jorts
Stonewashed Denim

Default

I just went full synthetic on my 196k after seafoaming the crap out of it, so I'd take both comments with a grain of salt.
No problems, engine's almost as good as new according to the dealerships around here.
XanRules is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 07:47 PM   #13
Magnetrax
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 198885
Join Date: Jan 2009
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Boise, ID
Vehicle:
1991 Legacy SS
white

Default

do it.
start engine
pull the hose clamp on the brake booster
pull hose off booster
pour/ let it suck/ seafoam into the hose
the idle will drop so start slow and dump in as much as you can without the engine bogging out.
do half a can or so.
drive around town, flooring it at will

just dont do it when your neighbor is trying to bbq with his family, cause he will hate you for it.
Magnetrax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2009, 08:06 PM   #14
Counterfit
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 124254
Join Date: Aug 2006
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Rhode Island
Vehicle:
2006 06 SGM Slowbaru
"The Scoobinator"

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magnetrax View Post
do it.
start engine
pull the hose clamp on the brake booster
pull hose off booster

pour/ let it suck/ seafoam into the hose
the idle will drop so start slow and dump in as much as you can without the engine bogging out.
do half a can or so.
drive around town, flooring it at will

just dont do it when your neighbor is trying to bbq with his family, cause he will hate you for it.
Except for the part in bold:
Quote:
Originally Posted by g-rider View Post
Good idea or no? I'm sure it's never been done on the car. I want to, but i'm nervous because of the high mileage.

I've searched and found a great deal on it, but I'm still not sure on mileage, or what vac line to feed through... Since the Brake Booster only hits the passenger side cylinders, and i dont have a turbo, so no BPV... where would it go besides the gas tank and crankcase?

Any help is appreciated.
Some people use the PCV line, which will feed all cylinders.
Counterfit is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2009, 12:07 AM   #15
ShadowVlican
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 156965
Join Date: Aug 2007
Chapter/Region: E. Canada
Location: Toronto
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jordan s View Post
i want to seafoam my car badly since i'm nearing 50,000 miles and i've read countless instructions on how to do it, but i have no idea what a PCV valve is so they're all useless. can someone explain or better yet post a picture of the PCV valve? sorry if i'm retarded for not knowing.
maybe this thread can help

http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/show....php?t=1648088
ShadowVlican is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2009, 12:19 AM   #16
antho!
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 159057
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: everywhere
Vehicle:
2004 ts wagon
aspen white

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kami333 View Post
I've seafoamed my 134k ej22 and 198k ej18 engines, no problems. I switched them to synthetic too I use 1/3 in the gas tank, 1/3 into the oil, and pour 1/3 through the PCV valve, then change the oil the next day.
did exactly that, i highlighted in red what i used for the intake, i used the bottom (left most in the picture) to suck the seafoam in, i felt my car coast better, no leaks, ~1k on my car, good luck

antho! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2009, 05:01 PM   #17
Reble_45
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 199014
Join Date: Jan 2009
Default

Strange, I never knew that you could use seafoam for that too. I always just did 1/2 in the tank and 1/2 in the oil. Strange.
Reble_45 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2009, 09:19 PM   #18
g-rider
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 181037
Join Date: May 2008
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: Northern California
Vehicle:
1997 BrightonRS
Red

Default

I did it today... 1/3 in the tank which will take awhile to burn through, 1/3 in the oil which i'm changing tomorrow after some light neighborhood driving, and 1/3 through the PCV. WORKED GREAT! Smoked like a mo fo! Definitely more crisp on the throttle response... But I haven't really romped on it because i still have the seafoam in the oil. After tomorrow's oil change she should be cruisin just fine.
g-rider is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2009, 12:08 AM   #19
watchunglava
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 168862
Join Date: Jan 2008
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Portland Maine
Vehicle:
2007 ej253n/a 5speed
Red Sox Nation Lifer

Default

watchunglava is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
deleting rear o2 sensor on my 96 ej18 brighton mxpunk Normally Aspirated Powertrain 3 04-13-2008 12:43 PM
RE:USDM EJ18 swap to EJ22 JDM or JDM EJ18 cbrkp Subaru Conversions 2 12-06-2006 03:07 PM
quick question on '95 impreza ej18 5mt diagnostics ride5000 Service & Maintenance 2 12-08-2005 03:09 PM
97 Impreza, Black 5spd, 173k, DC area SteveH Private Vehicle 'For Sale' Classifieds 34 05-16-2005 08:02 PM
More discussion on WRX EJ20 heads on EJ18 block required... Kostamojen Subaru Conversions 18 11-23-2003 04:03 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2014 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2014, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.