Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Saturday July 12, 2014
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences Home Registration is free! Visit the NASIOC Store NASIOC Rules Search Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Calendar Archive NASIOC Upgrade Garage Logout
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC General > News & Rumors > Non-Subaru News & Rumors

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-27-2009, 01:20 PM   #1
AVANTI R5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 73805
Join Date: Nov 2004
Default 2009 Lotus Exige Cup 260 First Drive Road Test





Quote:
Lighter, meaner, rawer. This really is a pocket-rocket ‘ready to race’ straight from the Lotus production line.
Lotus has brought into Australia just three 2009 Exige Cup 260 event-ready cars for a lucky trio of track day enthusiasts ready to go to the next level of competition.

Today, Targa Tasmania, one of Australia’s most famous tarmac events, will be bringing the island of Tasmania alive, and the Lotus Exige Cup 260 will be doing its darndest to storm its way to the head of the field.

Motoring scribe and regular Lotus test pilot Dean Evans will be flying the Lotus flag, piloting one of these latest motorsport-focused Exige Cup cars through the week long event.

But before Dean could get his oh-so-talented mitts on it, I was lucky enough to wangle the keys to his car before it was covered with sponsor logos and shipped off to Tasmania. Think of this test as our very own TMR-approved pre-race running in program.

The looks



Looking at the car’s exterior, the carbon-fibre bits are not as overdone as they appeared in the first press shots. In fact, they really complement the Aspen White body.
The interior has a straight race-car feel. Yes, it has air-con and electric windows, but that’s as luxurious as the Cup 260 gets.





There are two buttons where the radio should be, replaced by an battery isolation switch and a firebomb extinguisher release switch - both FIA and CAMS compliant.
There are two blue foam ejection nozzles by the passenger’s knees and two nozzles in the engine bay (although we couldn’t find the 2nd one).

Continuing the FIA-compliant theme there are also the same release switches found on the outside, but these are normally covered up by metal blanking plates when the car isn’t engaged in competition.

The protective plates stop people playing with them when you’re at the traffic lights.



Underneath the passenger’s knees is a whopping 2.25kg fire ‘tank’ (that’s the best word for it). It has a plastic cover held down by Velcro to stop the passenger’s legs knocking it, but there is no relief for the passenger. It is so intrusive most will find it impossible to comfortably accommodate it beneath their legs.




The dash and side sills are mostly in unfinished carbon fibre, lending the Cup 260 a real race car ambience. It’s austere, it’s spartan, it’s whatever you want to call it. There really isn’t a lot to see in the cockpit.

Moving rearwards, the boot (or what was the boot) holds the Accusump oil reservoir, which prevents the supercharged 1.8 litre Toyota four-pot from being starved of oil during high lateral G manouvres

Also in the boot are the exposed terminals of the lightweight race battery that can be knocked and damaged easily by whatever else you foolishly decide to cram into it. In short, the boot is completely unusable.

On the Road




Smoothly dropping off the kerb from the city-based Lotus showroom and heading up Sydney’s crowded William St, it is instantly obvious this is a taut track car and not really road material. It is loud, and people stare.

The exhaust is a Lotus Sport system, very loud and very raspy. But there is no booming in the cabin as with many third-party Exige exhausts; it happily pops and crackles when you lift the throttle and it sounds great.

Firstly, I’m not going to fib: I did give the car a good trouncing once the engine and tyres had some temperature in them. This car has been designed to be driven hard, not driven like nana.



So, find a clear stretch, drop the clutch and first gear is just suicidal from around 2500 rpm to the red line. Second and third gears also gather things up ferociously from 2500rpm, surging relentlessly to the red-line, torque from the Eaton M62 supercharger punching hard on the up-shifts and the engine screaming to its 192kW (257hp) peak power rating.

On a banzai run up East Sydney’s heartbreak hill, it did not want to break traction at all; slamming through second and third gears simply couldn’t unsettle the rear. Amazingly, the traction control light flashed not once thanks to the clean way it puts its power to the road though the Lotus-specific Advan A048 semi-slick tyres.

On the same stretch of road just two hours prior I was in an ‘09 model M3 (three people up). Even at 5-10km/h slower it was squirming about, M computer-logic tightening things up as we pushed hard up the hill.


The Cup 260 has just simple traction control, relying on its mechanical grip to nail it to the road - there’s no stability management like the boffin M3 . The Lotus felt as chuckable as an EVO or Subaru STI and much faster than the M3 was on the same patch of tarmac.

The specs say 0-100km/h circa 4.1 seconds and it feels it. Unlike the naturally-aspirated Exige, there was no tailing off the acceleration once getting into three figure speeds. The magic here is the power-to-weight ratio. Even the Exige S would not be able to touch this thing on sheer pace, with its 174kW (233hp) per tonne paling in comparison to the 215kW (288hp) per tonne of the Cup 260.

Lotus AU has brought in just three Cup 260 cars in Red, Silver and White (which now should be known as Evans White). With supercar-rivalling performance like this at just $139,990, I can’t see how these will be the only ones we’ll see.

With the ‘09 Targa Tasmania rally ready to go, I have to warn Dean that the car is a demon on the asphalt. We wish you all the luck in the world putting this thing up against the bigger boy’s toys. A David-and Goliath story in the making? We’ll see.

Its straight-line speed and sheer traction is amazing; go get ‘em!
GALLERY » Lotus Exige CUP 260 Road Test
http://www.themotorreport.com.au/271...ive-road-test/
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
AVANTI R5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2009, 03:53 PM   #2
Chiketkd
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 71634
Join Date: Sep 2004
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: C-Ville, VA
Vehicle:
In hibernation...

Default

Not too shabby - Lotus should bring that car here and market it as a cheaper alternative to the 911 GT3. ~260hp in an Exige must be insane!!!
Chiketkd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2009, 04:33 PM   #3
delongedoug
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 124113
Join Date: Aug 2006
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: To infinity
Vehicle:
and beyond!

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chiketkd View Post
Not too shabby - Lotus should bring that car here and market it as a cheaper alternative to the 911 GT3. ~260hp in an Exige must be insane!!!
According to this we already have a 260hp Exige here. Granted, it's very limited at 50 models but it's only $75k. Far from GT3 money. The "basic" 09 Exige S is 240hp and $65k. I doubt either could hang with a GT3, though.
delongedoug is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2009, 05:28 PM   #4
greg donovan
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 60743
Join Date: Apr 2004
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Fargo, ND
Vehicle:
'95 Impreza L
dirty and on jack stands

Default

what a gloriously impractical car!


i'll take 2!
greg donovan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2009, 10:26 PM   #5
kirbwrx
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 110450
Join Date: Mar 2006
Chapter/Region: International
Location: Sunny England
Vehicle:
2007 Spec.b Refugee
284hp 320tq Cobb Tuned

Default

this is one sexy ride...i can has 2 as well
kirbwrx is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2009, 10:39 PM   #6
EE/Physics
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 141732
Join Date: Feb 2007
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Vehicle:
2007 WRX TR
Black

Default

I only read news and rumors started by Avanti R5. Luckily thats like every single one thats not a repeat.
EE/Physics is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-27-2009, 11:46 PM   #7
im2lazy789
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 166857
Join Date: Dec 2007
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: Watkins Glen, NY
Vehicle:
2009 Ford Mustang GT

Default

It appears to be totally impractical. It is therefore a work of art.
im2lazy789 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2009, 08:43 AM   #8
erich_sc
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 11225
Join Date: Oct 2001
Chapter/Region: W. Canada
Location: Calgary
Vehicle:
09 135i
Le Mans Blue

Default

A GT3 I could drive every day though... this car... not so much. Maybe I'll get one of those and a used Taurus and still be significantly cheaper than the GT3! I'll take mine in black and gold please ala JPS.
erich_sc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2009, 12:47 PM   #9
Chiketkd
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 71634
Join Date: Sep 2004
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: C-Ville, VA
Vehicle:
In hibernation...

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by delongedoug View Post
According to this we already have a 260hp Exige here. Granted, it's very limited at 50 models but it's only $75k. Far from GT3 money. The "basic" 09 Exige S is 240hp and $65k. I doubt either could hang with a GT3, though.
The article talks about 0-100km/h (i.e. 0-62mph) in 4.1 seconds, mags normally subtract 0.2-0.3 seconds to get the equivalent 0-60mph time, which will put this car in the 3.8-3.9 second range which is in 911 GT3 territory.

Btw, I'm not saying this car will run with the GT3, just that it is the Lotus Exige equivalent to a GT3. Lightweight, derived from a motorsports racing car, etc. Could be a good way to market the car to the track-rats!
Chiketkd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2009, 03:46 PM   #10
justincredible
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 83633
Join Date: Mar 2005
Chapter/Region: RMIC
Location: The Mountains
Vehicle:
2012 bright green
box

Default


She's happy to see me. Awwww.
justincredible is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2009, 01:22 PM   #11
AVANTI R5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 73805
Join Date: Nov 2004
Default Review: 2009 Lotus Exige S 260 offers even more power and lightness

Quote:
Over its 61-year history, Lotus Cars has spent a considerable amount of time clawing its way back from the brink of insolvency. The company's most recent bout with financial disrepair came in the early Nineties after the front-wheel-drive Elan proved a commercial failure (surprise!) and the Esprit toiled away in the shadows of newer, more powerful supercars. As hope for the historic marque's triumphant return began to fade, a group of Lotus engineers pooled their collective will to create an all-new, back-to-basics model that would revive Colin Chapman's company and give hardened enthusiasts the purist's driving tool they craved.

In September of 1996, the Elise was born, and four years later, its hard-top sibling – the Exige – came on the scene. Over the last decade, we've seen a raft of super-special-limited-edition variants follow in its lightweight wake, but the ultimate version is this: the 2009 Lotus Exige S 260. Packing more power and "more lightness" than the 240 Sport we sampled last year, there's no doubt it's a telepathic terror on track, but we wanted to know if it was up to the depravity of Michigan roads, so we set our chiropractor on speed dial and headed out..

ut first, a quick recap of high school physics.

The definition of kinetic energy is e = 1/2 * m * v2. You can rearranged that equation to v = square root ((2 * e) / m). Automotive translation? You can make a vehicle quicker by either increasing available energy (more power!) or by cutting its mass (more lightness!). With this latest Exige, Lotus engineers have clearly said: "Screw it. Let's do both." And with that, they've taken the 240 S – already one of the lightest street cars on the market – and shaved nearly 60 pounds by replacing the engine cover, rear wing, front splitter, roof and side ducts with carbon fiber pieces, and they've fitted a set of lightweight sports seats and plonked a minimalist battery in the "trunk."




With the weight reduction out of the way, the engine tweakers in Hethel extracted a further 17 horsepower out of the supercharged, 1.8-liter Toyota-sourced four-cylinder engine to bring total output up to 257 horsepower and torque to a reasonably stout 174 pound-feet. While that's nothing to write home about in the two-ton luxobarges that populate the Great Lakes State, fit it to something that weighs just over 2,000 pounds while meeting the Fed's safety standards – all while returning 20 mpg in the city and 26 mpg on the highway – and you've got one of the most potent performance creations available to man. Assuming you can fit inside.

Lotus manages to achieve such a low mass (while meeting modern regulatory standards) by using a novel architecture built from a collection of aluminum extrusions riveted and glued together. The issue of ingress and egress stems from this: the chassis was originally designed for a convertible. The side beams are large enough to support most of the structure, meaning they're both tall and wide. In an Elise sans roof, no big deal. You just step over the sill and plop your backside into the seat. With the roof bolted in place, the experience is closer to sliding through the window of a race car or, more appropriately, down the barrel of a cannon.




Once you've wiggled your way inside (helpful hint: place your right foot in the well, sit on the sill, grab the wheel and tug yourself through), you're ensconced in a carbon fiber shell with a minimal amount of padding. The driver's seat moves fore and aft (the passenger seat is fixed) and both thrones benefit from cut-outs to accommodate a five-point racing harness and HANS device. As the seats are solid pieces of carbon fiber, there's no lateral give, so you'll want to start shopping for diet books on Amazon... yesterday.

The Exige's diminutive size and cramped cabin causes your legs to cant towards the center of the car where the trifecta of proper pedals reside, and while the steering wheel is fixed, the upright seats allow the wheel and shifter to fall readily to hand. Although early Elises were bereft of carpeting, exposing the matte aluminum to reaffirm your hardcore surroundings, the Exige receives carbon fiber caps on the door sills and dashboard, while the steering wheel, door panels and center console are coated in Alcantara. Cubbies? All you've got is an aluminum tray to the right of the radio and (hopefully) a helpful passenger.



Starting up the Exige involves pressing the unlock button on the key, inserting it into the column, twisting it to the "On" position and – within 30 seconds – pressing the engine "Start" button on the left side of the dash. If you miss the 30 second window, you simply press the button on the fob and the four-pot behind your head spins to life.

Historically, Toyota's high output, variable valve timing-equipped 1.8-liter four is too high strung and lacks usable grunt near the bottom of the tach. Fortunately, the supercharger Lotus has fitted to the Exige addresses both issues, removing the torque deficit and vastly improving daily drivablity. Combined with the Exige's low mass, the engine makes trolling along in stop-and-start traffic a remarkably effortless process. The trade-off? With the intercooler mounted atop the engine and fed by the roof-mounted scoop, the rear window has been replaced by a solid bulkhead, leaving the outside mirrors as the only means of conveying what's going on behind you. Combined with the oh-so-low roof and seating position, road monsters like the Honda Fit tower over the Exige. Those afflicted with Napoleon complexes need not apply.



Naturally, maneuvering around a garage or parking lot takes some effort as the Exige – like its predecessors – doesn't come equipped with power assisted steering. However, once you're on the go, the effort falls away and the helm is pure mechanical perfection. Once you escape the confines of urban life, any worries about size, steering or visibility simply melt into the distance.

Climbing up the Exige's graduated tachometer towards 9,000 RPM, you'll notice there's no marked redline. Instead, a series of three red LEDs illuminate on the dash when it's time to shift. When the engine is cold, the indicators come on between 5,000 and 6,000 RPM. Once the coolant and oil are up to temperature, you can throttle down, spin the 2ZZ past 4,000 RPM – where the VVTi kicks in – all the way to its 8,500 RPM redline and enjoy the mechanical duet of the engine and supercharger ricocheting around the undampened cabin.

With the engine rocketing towards redline, the Exige's gearbox is ready to deliver six perfectly spaced ratios to keep the supercharged four in its meaty sweet spot. The aluminum shift lever benefits from short throws, although the linkage on our (likely abused) press car could have been slightly more precise. The narrow footwell – a minor annoyance earlier – became an asset, with closely spaced pedals that made heel-and-toe action a breeze.



Off the line, the Exige has you covered with a variable launch control feature. Unlike most systems that give you one option to create the perfect standing start, Lotus allows drivers to set the engine's launch control speed anywhere between 2,000 and 8,000 RPM via a knob on the left of the steering wheel. Once it's set, simply floor the long pedal and the system holds the engine at the pre-set speed. Drop the clutch and you've got a perfect launch time after time. After fiddling with the settings, we found the magic mark (4,500 RPM), allowing the Exige to burst off the line with the perfect amount of wheel spin. No bogging, no slithering, just thrust – even on less-than-perfect surfaces.

But as good as the engine, launch control and auditory assault are, they're far from the best part.

It's no wonder automakers around the world tap Lotus Engineering to sort out their suspensions – the Exige is the perfect case study. Simply put, the roads in southeast Michigan suck. They're loaded with bumps, cracks and heaves. But even though the Exige is clearly not tuned for comfort, the suspension does a remarkable job of dealing with Michigan's worst.

Unlike most stiffly sprung sports cars, the Exige doesn't bounce around. The copious quantities of mechanical grip convey every nuance of the tarmac into the cabin, but none of this is as jarring as you'd expect. Flying down a curvy road at a clip far beyond what most cars are capable of, your backside just inches from the road, the Exige is supremely confidence inspiring. Even hitting a frost heave mid-corner left our little Lotus unperturbed.



Unfortunately, it's not always sunshine and sweeping tarmac. But even at those times, the Exige impressed. Cruising down the freeway in a downpour, the window defogger did an admirable job of maintaining forward visibility – and even with the nearly slick Yokohama Advan A048s fitted at all four corners, the Exige never slipped or slithered. While it's far from a daily schlepper – a four cubic foot bin behind the engine bay and whatever space you can manage in the passenger seat is what passes for cargo space – as a play thing, the S 260 approaches four-wheeled perfection.

Another benefit of the Exige's small engine and featherweight design is decent fuel economy. The EPA rates the Exige S260 at 20/26 mpg city and highway and we averaged 19 mpg on two fill ups of the 10.6 gallon tank. The Exige and its carbon fiber doesn't come cheap though. The S 260 adds $9,000 to the starting price of the S240 and the out-the-door tab affixed to our example came to $77,115. That's more than $30,000 less than a Tesla Roadster, which shares its lineage with the Lotus Elise. Given that most drivers of either this or the Tesla are likely to put on far fewer miles than on an average car, we'd opt for the 2-3 minute fill ups of the Lotus if it were our own money – assuming, of course, that we wedge ourselves inside.


http://www.autoblog.com/2009/09/22/r...er-and-lightn/
AVANTI R5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2009, 03:16 PM   #12
nhat
#Belieber
Moderator
 
Member#: 140163
Join Date: Feb 2007
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: 3MI Racing
Vehicle:
03 STi
hellaflunctional

Default

i'll take 2!
nhat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2009, 03:53 PM   #13
linus011
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 9132
Join Date: Aug 2001
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Chicago, Il
Vehicle:
2005 WRX STi
2009 Fit, 1972 Dart

Default

The Exige is one of my favorite cars of all time... Those graphics are ghastly...
linus011 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2009, 03:54 PM   #14
Tim-H
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 65751
Join Date: Jul 2004
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Redmond, WA
Vehicle:
'10 VULVA

Default

god damn I want that car. In that color or orange. So hot
Tim-H is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2009, 03:39 PM   #15
AVANTI R5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 73805
Join Date: Nov 2004
Default 2009 Lotus Exige S 260 Sport - Quick Spin



Quote:
WHAT IS IT?
An Americanized version of the Euro-market Lotus Exige Cup 260, and, as such, the most powerful version of the diminutive two-seater that Lotus sells in the U.S. It’s also one of the most intense sports cars you can buy at any price. Bite-sized and featherweight, the Exige S 260 Sport features a supercharged, 257-hp version of Toyota’s 1.8-liter four-pot in back, and with no rear window, one-piece racing seats, and door sills as wide as the Great Plains, it is blatantly disinterested in accommodating anything other than two passengers in its cramped, noisy, and spartan cabin. Those with back problems will have a horrendous time getting inside, and those same problems will only be made worse after being jostled around for a few miles. But honestly, comfort is soooo not the point of this limited-run Exige. Our scrumptious pearl-white tester was the first of 50 built for the purposes of homologation for numerous American racing events. The track is where this car belongs.


HOW DOES IT DRIVE?
Unfortunately, the track is the only place we didn’t get to take the S 260 Sport during its four-day stay with us in Los Angeles. We did, however, burn through two tanks of fuel (it only has a nine-gallon tank) taking it to the grocery store, the laundromat, the gym, and on several high-octane blasts up and down Mulholland Drive—you know, all the stuff single guys do in L.A. We even shot down to San Diego and back, perched atop a pillow the whole time. Yes, it hurts. But it was an absolute riot. For passersby—who are barely visible out the mail-slot windows—and for our hapless passengers—who sort of knew what to expect by looking at it but were nonetheless rendered stupid by the violence with which this car tears up the street—the S 260 Sport provided a lifetime of memories in just 416 logged miles. We got used to the twitchy, unassisted steering that is virtually hard-wired to the driver’s cerebral cortex. We got used to a level of stereo infidelity rivaled only by ham radios. We got used to the symphony of rattling carbon-fiber interior panels. We got used to the funky power door locks that we mostly had to operate from the outside. We got used to the three-step starting procedure. We even got used to asking for help to back the thing up. We’re not sure, however, that we’ll get used to life without it.


HOW DOES IT STACK UP?
Um, it’s hard to come up with a competitive set for the Exige, let alone the S 260 Sport, but perhaps the Honda S2000 CR on the low end or the Porsche Cayman S. The BMW M Coupe would have qualified, too, but they don’t make that anymore. In any case, it’s safe to say that the real competition to the S 260 Sport will be found only on the track.


WHAT’S THE COST?
The 2009 S 260 Sport costs $76,120, and the white paint on our tester added $3300. Given that eye-popping total, it’s no surprise that there are several of the original 50 units available in dealer inventory. As for additional production in the future? We’ll quote Lotus’s PR chief, Kevin Smith: “At this point, we have no plans yet to do a new 2010 version of the S 260 Sport for the street and we currently have no plans for a Cup 260 for North America because we’re still promoting the 2-Eleven as our track-only car in North America. That’s not to say that if someone had to have a Cup 260 we couldn’t build one for them.”
http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/...ort-quick_spin
AVANTI R5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2009, 07:17 PM   #16
E. Nick
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 8489
Join Date: Jul 2001
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: Atherton, CA
Vehicle:
1978 Plymouth Volare
Maroon / White Vinyl

Default

I was very hot on this car a few months back... so to share what I've learned - there are still a few new ones in the US - arguably the nicest is the Titanium car at St Louis Motorsports and they are ready to deal. There is also a used white one in AZ.

However, I was speaking with a hardcore Lotus guy at a car meet - he now has an Exige S240 with Ohlins and a tune, so it's basically a 260 sport without all the carbon. He was also a catalyst for getting the Elise/Exige over to the US and was involved with the design. He said his old Elise with the smaller brakes and the 15" rims handled better, and I've heard similar stories from other owners. Apparently, the cars were designed with that wheel and brake package, but marketing said the 'Mericans want 16's at least.

I still think the 260 Sport is a good value given the amount of hand-laid carbon and other niceties. However, after researching, my Lotus choice would be a N/A Elise with Ohlins and the aftermarket TVS supercharger from BOE. All in under 50K, sick handling and the power to weight of a Z06.
E. Nick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-23-2009, 07:22 PM   #17
delongedoug
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 124113
Join Date: Aug 2006
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: To infinity
Vehicle:
and beyond!

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by linus011 View Post
The Exige is one of my favorite cars of all time... Those graphics are ghastly...
Ding and ding.
delongedoug is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
The 2010 Model Year Lotus Exige Cup 260: Increased Specification, Improved Efficiency AVANTI R5 Non-Subaru News & Rumors 17 08-28-2009 02:02 PM
2009 Subaru Impreza 2.5GT - First Drive Review AVANTI R5 News & Rumors 37 02-12-2009 03:22 PM
Lotus releases 2008 Exige Sport Cup 260 AVANTI R5 Non-Subaru News & Rumors 0 02-14-2008 03:04 PM
Lotus shock: cup-holder found in Exige S NYCshopper Non-Subaru News & Rumors 14 11-18-2007 03:13 AM
2007 Lotus Sport Exige Cup (US SPEC) @ 2006 LA Auto Show NYCshopper Non-Subaru News & Rumors 30 12-04-2006 12:53 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:13 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2014 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2014, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.