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Old 04-09-2010, 01:21 AM   #1
chimchimm5
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Default SLR photography of rallyx

I'm a slr newb and I'd like to ask any tips for shooting moving cars at a rallyx.

I have a canon with the basic lenses (35-70) and (75-200mm)

What's a good way to capture the moving cars sharp enough in the body but still maintain the blur of the motion of the wheels and dirt spray? I'm hoping that somehow a sense of momentum of the car is captured but I don't know what accomplishes this.

The tips in the gallery forum are for static pics.
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Old 04-09-2010, 01:34 AM   #2
foa_42
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Set the focus in one spot, pan with the car. When the car hits the focus point click the shutter with a minimum of 200 to still capture the blur of the wheels and have a sharp car. It also depends on the film you are using.
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Old 04-09-2010, 10:10 AM   #3
wagonman
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Panning is pretty simple once you get the hang of it, takes a little practice though.

Put the camera in manual mode for the best results.
Shutter speed - keep it quicker than 1/250th of a second. Most people aren't steady enough to go slower than that, including me. Most of my good shots are at 1/320th.
Aperture - I try to keep mine around 8 or so, but use this to get your lighting just right. Remeber, a lower aperture # setting lets in more light, and a higher aperture # setting is darker... we won't go in to how the lower the #, the higher the aperture mess... it never made sense anyway.
Format - if you plan on really editing your pictures, use RAW format or whatever Canon calls it ( I am a nikon fan, hence the "RAW" reference )

It will take practice and some adjusting to get it where you want it and where you are comfortable doing it, but stick with it and it will pay off
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Old 04-09-2010, 01:27 PM   #4
leecea
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The thing to remember with panning is do not stop when you press the shutter. Stand facing the spot where you want to take the picture. Start by looking through the camera at the oncoming car and practice following the car, trying to keep it centered in the viewfinder, as it goes past. Keep following it past the point where you plan to take the picture. Once you're used to that, just squeeze the shutter release as the car goes past the right point but do not interupt your smooth panning motion.

I think it will be easier with a short focal length lense, so you get less camera shake messing you up.
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Old 04-10-2010, 02:50 AM   #5
chimchimm5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foa_42 View Post
Set the focus in one spot, pan with the car. When the car hits the focus point click the shutter with a minimum of 200 to still capture the blur of the wheels and have a sharp car. It also depends on the film you are using.
you mean iso 200 or 1/200 shutter speed?
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Old 04-10-2010, 02:51 AM   #6
chimchimm5
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And thanks for the replies... I'll be trying this tomorrow.
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Old 04-10-2010, 08:49 AM   #7
wagonman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chimchimm5 View Post
you mean iso 200 or 1/200 shutter speed?
You always want to shoot with the lowest ISO possible for the best picture quality, but as a last resort, it can be used to add additional light
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Old 04-10-2010, 05:00 PM   #8
chkltcow
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Use the 70-200 if you're going to be any distance away from the track. You want to fill up the frame to get that excitement of being close up.
If your camera has "Ai Servo" focus mode.... set it to that. That will keep the camera constantly focusing while it's snapping shots.
Set your camera to high speed shutter... this way you hold the shutter button down and get a burst of 5 or 6 shots
Set your camera to Tv (for Canon) or S (for Nikon) so you're controlling your shutter speed. Start by setting it to 1/100s, chimp your shots to see if you're getting appropriate background blur with it, and adjust up or down from there. The slower the car is going, the slower your shutter speed needs to be. I doubt 1/200 is going to give you any blur at the speeds a RallyX is going to see.

This was shot with all those settings at 1/200s... but this car was probably pushing 100-120mph as it passed by.


The biggest thing is to practice panning. All the settings in the world mean nothing if you can't hold a steady hand while you pan. Practice, practice, practice... then practice some more. Don't be surprised if you shoot 2000+ frames in a day if you're really trying to improve. Shoot, chimp, adjust... shoot, chimp, adjust... etc.
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