Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Wednesday April 16, 2014
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences Home Registration is free! Visit the NASIOC Store NASIOC Rules Search Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Calendar Archive NASIOC Upgrade Garage Logout
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Built Motor Discussion

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-07-2013, 10:15 PM   #2526
dexterous
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 23553
Join Date: Aug 2002
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Slippery Rock, PA
Vehicle:
2005 STI - WRB
2014 WRX - Silver

Default

Speaking of the Hydra, check out these screen shots! Look how easy it is to program the outputs. There's so many options its crazy!

Using this setting, I have my Eboost2 automatically switch boost maps when the car is filled with E85:




Instead of three relays, a timing circuit, sensors and countless wires, this output runs the fuel pump duty on an as needed basis with only a single wire:

* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
dexterous is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:20 PM   #2527
dexterous
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 23553
Join Date: Aug 2002
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Slippery Rock, PA
Vehicle:
2005 STI - WRB
2014 WRX - Silver

Default

Here's a totally crazy example of the logic you can create. Thus far, I haven't found a value that the Hydra reads from sensor input or calculates after the fact that isn't available:




Check out the number of variables listed in relation to port air temp:

dexterous is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:24 PM   #2528
dexterous
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 23553
Join Date: Aug 2002
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Slippery Rock, PA
Vehicle:
2005 STI - WRB
2014 WRX - Silver

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KillerBMotorsport View Post
^ Right but radiant engine heat isn't the only heat here. Turbo outlet temps increase as well at high load with high flow depending on many conditions. I'm more curious about how these temps are compensated for.
I have thought about this too. I am actually going to see Phil in person tomorrow so I will ask him about it.
dexterous is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:27 PM   #2529
kakarot09
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 182375
Join Date: Jun 2008
Chapter/Region: SWIC
Location: Northern Nevada
Vehicle:
08 Sti
Wrbm

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KillerBMotorsport View Post
^ Right but radiant engine heat isn't the only heat here. Turbo outlet temps increase as well at high load with high flow depending on many conditions. I'm more curious about how these temps are compensated for.
Right the turbo increases the temp at higher loads and rpms ALL the time. So when you tune the timing and fuel tables you already take that into account. If the turbo increases temp more from say 22-28 psi then your fueling and or timing tables that are based on load and rpm, already reflect this heat and pressure change during tuning.
kakarot09 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 10:45 PM   #2530
dexterous
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 23553
Join Date: Aug 2002
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Slippery Rock, PA
Vehicle:
2005 STI - WRB
2014 WRX - Silver

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakarot09 View Post
Right the turbo increases the temp at higher loads and rpms ALL the time. So when you tune the timing and fuel tables you already take that into account. If the turbo increases temp more from say 22-28 psi then your fueling and or timing tables that are based on load and rpm, already reflect this heat and pressure change during tuning.

At least in my mind, I can easily see this being true. If you think about it, the stock ECU pulls the air temp from the filter pre-turbo and takes the same info into account. There's no way that the stock ECU would know if you just did a hard pull and the IC is heat soaked or not.
dexterous is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-07-2013, 11:34 PM   #2531
climbhigh09
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 254163
Join Date: Aug 2010
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: MD
Vehicle:
2011 WRX 20GXTR
Black

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dexterous View Post
Here's a totally crazy example of the logic you can create. Thus far, I haven't found a value that the Hydra reads from sensor input or calculates after the fact that isn't available:

Check out the number of variables listed in relation to port air temp:
Man... I like toys like that; the OEM ECU is pretty incredible when paired with the AP or opensource even.

Does the Hydra have logic that limits your use? The chip(s?) can only perform so many tasks before you start to loose the resolution necessary to keep up with the changing environment of the system. I would think that, without some expensive processors, even the OEM sensor list is nearing the edge of capability. Throw your hydramist and fuel sensors in the on top of a bunch of additional logic; that is a heavy load- right?
climbhigh09 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 03:56 AM   #2532
kellygnsd
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 32669
Join Date: Feb 2003
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Rancho C
Vehicle:
2007 2.34LR, EFR7670
LINK G4 hybrid STi

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KillerBMotorsport View Post
Not entirely true. An intercooler will be much more efficient in freezing temps than it will on a 110 day. Same goes with humidity. As wet bulb changes, so does a heat exchangers efficiency.

Maybe I'm overthinking it... or underthinking it
You are not. While I see how Phil is doing what he's doing there are still things this cannot compensate for. What about an obstructed FMIC opening or long extended pulls where your intercooler might actually reach thermal equilibrium?

Phil has the data to back up what he does but it doesn't seem possible to me that an ambient temp of 75 degrees will always equal an 89 degree port temp under all conditions with all the other variables involved.

If you are worried about the IAT fuel corrections putting you closer to your knock threshold you can tweak you IAT ignition comps to counteract that effect.
kellygnsd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 04:05 AM   #2533
kellygnsd
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 32669
Join Date: Feb 2003
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Rancho C
Vehicle:
2007 2.34LR, EFR7670
LINK G4 hybrid STi

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dexterous View Post
Here's a totally crazy example of the logic you can create. Thus far, I haven't found a value that the Hydra reads from sensor input or calculates after the fact that isn't available:




Check out the number of variables listed in relation to port air temp:

Standalones rock don't they
kellygnsd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 06:56 AM   #2534
KillerBMotorsport
NASIOC Vendor
 
Member#: 198281
Join Date: Dec 2008
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Virginia
Vehicle:
2005 WRX/STi
WRB of course

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakarot09 View Post
Right the turbo increases the temp at higher loads and rpms ALL the time. So when you tune the timing and fuel tables you already take that into account. If the turbo increases temp more from say 22-28 psi then your fueling and or timing tables that are based on load and rpm, already reflect this heat and pressure change during tuning.
I agree, this can be taken into account during the tuning session, and maybe it's just tuned with a margin to take this into consideration... but that increase in the 22-28psi range is never going to be the same based on environmental conditions.

The factory MAF setup isn't perfect, but the factory does know what intercooler and turbo (and accompnaying efficiencies) come on the car and there is learning based on beedback to tweak fueling.

One of the reasons (although a small reason) I switched from 'big' blow-thru to Cobb SD is it removed the IAT variable from an assumed value to a known value.

On another note, the Hydra gui looks much better than years past, and fairly simple to program I/O.
KillerBMotorsport is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 10:47 AM   #2535
MRF582
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 48219
Join Date: Nov 2003
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Vehicle:
. Always drive
the race line .

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Element Tuning View Post
First and foremost the Hydra is tuned via speed density, so that's primarily load vs. RPM with compensations for TPS, IAT, Coolant......and many more.
Quote:
Originally Posted by dexterous View Post
At least in my mind, I can easily see this being true. If you think about it, the stock ECU pulls the air temp from the filter pre-turbo and takes the same info into account. There's no way that the stock ECU would know if you just did a hard pull and the IC is heat soaked or not.
A BIG difference is the stock ECU uses a MAF sensor which basically measures how much oxygen is being ingested. Assuming no leaks, mass flow rate in = mass flow rate out. A Speed Density system uses the Ideal Gas Law and to calculate how much oxygen is being ingested, so you NEED Pressure, Volumetric Flow Rate (Displacement/Engine Speed) AND Temperature.

One of the biggest points of SD is to not have to estimate conditions in the manifold like with the stock MAF system. You can just measure it exactly. There's a reason Bosch decided to spend time coming up with a sensor that can measure both temp and pressure in one package: http://www.bmotorsports.com/shop/pro...oducts_id/1721

Putting the temp sensor in/near the manifold also makes it so you don't have to tune the IMAT compensation! The IMAT compensation that Subaru uses in their Group N SD ROM, is exactly what physics says it should be! Look at this spreadsheet where we first calculated Air Density as a function of temperature then made the pivot temperature point the same as stock (104F) then calculated the IMAT compensation with reference to temperature. The math worked out exactly to what Subaru is already using. And this was one less thing I had to tune on my SD setup. The damn thing just works at all temperatures!


Quote:
Originally Posted by kellygnsd View Post
You are not. While I see how Phil is doing what he's doing there are still things this cannot compensate for. What about an obstructed FMIC opening or long extended pulls where your intercooler might actually reach thermal equilibrium?

Phil has the data to back up what he does but it doesn't seem possible to me that an ambient temp of 75 degrees will always equal an 89 degree port temp under all conditions with all the other variables involved.
Exactly. This unnecessary math is leaning hard on some assumptions that may not always hold true. This calculated port air temp business just seems like an convoluted and less precise way of getting what you actually want; the temp of the air in the intake manifold...


But, I understand what Phil is saying about the tune automatically running richer when the difference between ambient and manifold temp gets further from what is tuned. That when the manifold air temp is higher than expected, the tune will run richer. And I guess that's okay for a car that's always on the move. But this would absolutely suck for a car sitting at the start of a drag strip waiting for the lights to drop in the middle of summer. Or a traffic light. It would run unnecessarily rich.

But, there is no need to over-enrich the mixture when the intercooler starts becoming inefficient. It doesn't matter why the air temp in the manifold goes up; whether it's due to it being hotter outside or because the intercooler is not cooling enough. All that matters is the Volumetric Flow Rate and Density of the air in the manifold.

Last edited by MRF582; 01-08-2013 at 11:18 AM.
MRF582 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 11:26 AM   #2536
Element Tuning
Former Vendor
 
Member#: 54918
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: 673 WHP Element ProComp Engine
Default

Wow, there's just too much here for me to address each post but keep in mind I don't disagree with much of the theory but I do disagree on many fronts when is comes to practical application. It's what really a happens in the real world under real conditions and components.

Quote:
Originally Posted by kakarot09 View Post
Right the turbo increases the temp at higher loads and rpms ALL the time. So when you tune the timing and fuel tables you already take that into account. If the turbo increases temp more from say 22-28 psi then your fueling and or timing tables that are based on load and rpm, already reflect this heat and pressure change during tuning.
In a nutshell this is the basically the core of how volumetric efficiency of a given setup is dealt with. For people that don't tune with actual injector pulse widths it's harder to visualize how VE changes with boost, RPM, and with different modifications. When tuning the OEM ecu you are just so used to looking at AFR targets and not real injection volume. As you tune a map in the Hydra you initially start with pretty linear VE changes as boost rises. The fuel map itself looks like a 3D representation of the torque curve. Often with small turbocharger and a TMIC as boost gets high all of a sudden your fuel pulse stops increasing linearly and you're no longer gaining the same power per +1 psi and therefore you are not adding as much fuel. You can see the slope decline from the usual trend.

Now as ambient temps decrease, there's more oxygen, and your intercooler efficiency increases. As a result if you don't do anything about your boost level it will increase but with that you move into a new load cell which has more fuel and your IAT is taking care of the newly increased oxygen. But you're running a closed loop boost control system so that natural increase in boost is counteracted and boost is lowered back to where it should be negating so of that huge power increase you see from higher boost levels.

But you say, Phil it's more cooler post IC and you would be right. This is why the IAT correction curve is not linear! Intercooler efficiency at colder ambient temps is dealt with.

We just all need to agree there is no perfect solution which is why closed loop fueling, boost control, etc. is in play for any sophisticated EMS. Tom will be the first person to tell you his Hydra has been seasonally consistent and his OEM speed density solution was not. It's because of all the hard work I put into developing a set of correction tables specifically for the Hydra and tuned them seasonally to ensure we ended up with the consistency or safety nets I wanted in place.

I suggest that Hydra customers follow my lead but if they choose a different path just be prepared to have to go a full year reinventing compensations that will deliver the consistency and safety you need.
Element Tuning is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 11:42 AM   #2537
MRF582
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 48219
Join Date: Nov 2003
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Vehicle:
. Always drive
the race line .

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Element Tuning View Post
Tom will be the first person to tell you his Hydra has been seasonally consistent and his OEM speed density solution was not. It's because of all the hard work I put into developing a set of correction tables specifically for the Hydra and tuned them seasonally to ensure we ended up with the consistency or safety nets I wanted in place.
Tom's OEM SD setup was tuned like absolute dog ****. The software is fully capable just the dude working the numbers had no clue. I think it was one of his first Subaru OEM SD setups.

I, on the other hand, have almost zero seasonal variations (less than 3%) with my OEM SD setup. And the temperature here swings from 2F to almost 100F throughout the year... But it did take me hundreds of hours of tweaking and doing lots of math to learn the nuances. Maybe I am just not a fast learner,
MRF582 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 12:00 PM   #2538
bboylocob
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 151809
Join Date: Jun 2007
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: New Orleans
Vehicle:
2007 WRX
Black

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Element Tuning View Post
Wow, there's just too much here for me to address each post but keep in mind I don't disagree with much of the theory but I do disagree on many fronts when is comes to practical application. It's what really a happens in the real world under real conditions and components.

In a nutshell this is the basically the core of how volumetric efficiency of a given setup is dealt with. For people that don't tune with actual injector pulse widths it's harder to visualize how VE changes with boost, RPM, and with different modifications. When tuning the OEM ecu you are just so used to looking at AFR targets and not real injection volume. As you tune a map in the Hydra you initially start with pretty linear VE changes as boost rises. The fuel map itself looks like a 3D representation of the torque curve. Often with small turbocharger and a TMIC as boost gets high all of a sudden your fuel pulse stops increasing linearly and you're no longer gaining the same power per +1 psi and therefore you are not adding as much fuel. You can see the slope decline from the usual trend.

Now as ambient temps decrease, there's more oxygen, and your intercooler efficiency increases. As a result if you don't do anything about your boost level it will increase but with that you move into a new load cell which has more fuel and your IAT is taking care of the newly increased oxygen. But you're running a closed loop boost control system so that natural increase in boost is counteracted and boost is lowered back to where it should be negating so of that huge power increase you see from higher boost levels.

But you say, Phil it's more cooler post IC and you would be right. This is why the IAT correction curve is not linear! Intercooler efficiency at colder ambient temps is dealt with.

We just all need to agree there is no perfect solution which is why closed loop fueling, boost control, etc. is in play for any sophisticated EMS. Tom will be the first person to tell you his Hydra has been seasonally consistent and his OEM speed density solution was not. It's because of all the hard work I put into developing a set of correction tables specifically for the Hydra and tuned them seasonally to ensure we ended up with the consistency or safety nets I wanted in place.

I suggest that Hydra customers follow my lead but if they choose a different path just be prepared to have to go a full year reinventing compensations that will deliver the consistency and safety you need.
Very well explained. I have hydra with a map from Phil. Where i live its not as cold but is at to below sea level and temps from 40's- 110 ambient temps. I have logged all extreme temps i see and have been very consistent. I am very impressed with the hydra and Phils knowledge.

Like the post above says and phil says not all is perfect but its all on the time u put u into ur system or tune. If u half ass it.well u get what u pay for. U take ur time and get someone or urself put the hrs and days into testing and it will not be perfect but pretty darn close.
bboylocob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 01:11 PM   #2539
Maxwell Power
Former Vendor
 
Member#: 190729
Join Date: Oct 2008
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Marysville, WA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Element Tuning View Post
But you say, Phil it's more cooler post IC and you would be right. This is why the IAT correction curve is not linear! Intercooler efficiency at colder ambient temps is dealt with.
actually no.



This is why it's not linear. Air density isn't linear with temperature.
Maxwell Power is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 02:46 PM   #2540
climbhigh09
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 254163
Join Date: Aug 2010
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: MD
Vehicle:
2011 WRX 20GXTR
Black

Default

^Ding. Convection heat transfer is linear, for most simple calcs:
climbhigh09 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 04:28 PM   #2541
Element Tuning
Former Vendor
 
Member#: 54918
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: 673 WHP Element ProComp Engine
Default

[quote=Maxwell Power;38862549]actually no.



This is why it's not linear. Air density isn't linear with temperature.

Please don't bother trying to educate me on tuning. My point was that intercooler efficiency based on ambient temp isn't linear either and therefore it's dealt with in the Hydra correction tables.

Anyways Tom is super happy. He was down right giddy at how awesome it runs now!

Like I said do whatever you guys feel is best, I know what works for me and I've tried it all . I've been developing engine management systems for 10 over years.
Element Tuning is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 04:38 PM   #2542
Element Tuning
Former Vendor
 
Member#: 54918
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: 673 WHP Element ProComp Engine
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by climbhigh09 View Post
^Ding. Convection heat transfer is linear, for most simple calcs:
This is when I have to say real world tuning has proven to me that fuel compensation for IC efficiency does not have a linear change based on ambient temp. Again you have to realize post turbocharger IATs are not 1 to 1 with ambient temp. I know this from tuning NA engine vs. turbocharged engines and how different the IAT compensations for fueling need to be.

If there is one thing I've learned over the years tuning, it's that sometimes you need to toss conventional wisdom out the window.

Last edited by Element Tuning; 01-08-2013 at 04:45 PM.
Element Tuning is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 04:45 PM   #2543
Element Tuning
Former Vendor
 
Member#: 54918
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: 673 WHP Element ProComp Engine
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MRF582 View Post
... But it did take me hundreds of hours of tweaking
And that is really the bottom line isn't it? A fully tuned and developed strategy will always be best. In this world if you are not 100% capable yourself, all you can do is pick the most capable person to get you where you want to go.
Element Tuning is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-08-2013, 05:02 PM   #2544
Maxwell Power
Former Vendor
 
Member#: 190729
Join Date: Oct 2008
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Marysville, WA
Default

[quote=Element Tuning;38864295]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maxwell Power View Post
actually no.



This is why it's not linear. Air density isn't linear with temperature.

Please don't bother trying to educate me on tuning. My point was that intercooler efficiency based on ambient temp isn't linear either and therefore it's dealt with in the Hydra correction tables.

Anyways Tom is super happy. He was down right giddy at how awesome it runs now!

Like I said do whatever you guys feel is best, I know what works for me and I've tried it all . I've been developing engine management systems for 10 over years.
You the boss, Phil.
Maxwell Power is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 11:06 AM   #2545
dexterous
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 23553
Join Date: Aug 2002
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Slippery Rock, PA
Vehicle:
2005 STI - WRB
2014 WRX - Silver

Default

As a few of you may have caught, I did in fact take the car to Phil on Tuesday to get the Hydra 2.7 "pre-tuned". It was somewhat of a nightmare experience because the daily low has been around 16F and there's around 2ft of snow at my house. Since I am running max dry tires and have race coolant (not anti-freeze) in the engine, things were a little crazy.

We were able to get the car down my somewhat steep driveway and onto the trailer the night before without an issue. I left the car outside overnight with a block heater going with the hope that it would significantly warm up the next day like the weather man said it would. Unfortunately, it was 19F at 6AM and there was no way that i was going to chance hauling a car with race coolant in 19F weather. I drained about a gallon of coolant form the system and drove to get some anti-freeze.

We arrived at Element a few hours later and Phil had the car running nearly instantly. We drove around for about two hours dealing with any driveability issues and getting all the basics setup. The car runs very well and its AMAZINGLY RESPONSIVE!!! There's zero comparison to how it ran this past summer which if you recall was VERY laggy. I couldn't be happier!

The trip back was uneventful but when we got to my house we ran into a lot of trouble. It took 30 minutes to get the car up my 25ft driveway due to ice. It also took us over an hour to park the trailer because the truck just kept slipping sideways every time we tried to back up. We ended up using chains and a small come along to drag the trailer back into its spot. In the end I was frozen and tired but at least the car worked!

Here's my car on my trailer sitting a bit down the street from my house. My road isn't flat so we always have an interesting time loading.

Last edited by dexterous; 01-10-2013 at 10:42 PM.
dexterous is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 11:33 AM   #2546
bboylocob
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 151809
Join Date: Jun 2007
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: New Orleans
Vehicle:
2007 WRX
Black

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dexterous View Post
As a few of you may have caught, I did in fact take the car to Phil on Tuesday to get the Hydra 2.7 "pre-tuned". It was somewhat of a nightmare experience because the daily low has been around 16F and there's around 2ft of snow at my house. Since I am running max dry tires and have race coolant (not anti-freeze) in the engine, things were a little crazy.

We were able to get the car down my somewhat steep driveway and onto the trailer the night before without an issue. I left the car outside overnight with a block heater going with the hope that it would significantly warm up the next day like the weather man said it would. Unfortunately, it was 19F at 6AM and there was no way that i was going to chance hauling a car with race coolant in 19F weather. I drained about a gallon of coolant form the system and drove to get some anti-freeze.

We arrived at Element a few hours later and Phil had the car running nearly instantly. We drove around for about two hours dealing with any driveability issues and getting all the basics setup. The car runs very well and its AMAZINGLY RESPONSIVE!!! There's zero comparison to how it ran this past summer which if you recall was VERY laggy. I couldn't be happier!

The trip back was uneventful but when we got to my house we ran into a lot of trouble. It took 30 minutes to get the car up 25ft up my driveway due to ice. It also took us over an hour to park the trailer because the truck just kept slipping sideways every time we tried to back up. We ended up using chains and a small come along to drag the trailer back into its spot. In the end I was frozen and tired but at least the car worked!

Here's my car on my trailer sitting a bit down the street from my house. My road isn't flat so we always have an interesting time loading.
That is great to hear buddy. Its been a long one but u finally there
bboylocob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 02:44 AM   #2547
SurfGuruJeff
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 148974
Join Date: May 2007
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: San Diego
Vehicle:
2002 WRX R.I.P.
2005 STi - sold

Default

Please let this be the time your car runs sustainably for at least a year or two without any problems!!!
SurfGuruJeff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 09:01 AM   #2548
bboylocob
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 151809
Join Date: Jun 2007
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: New Orleans
Vehicle:
2007 WRX
Black

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SurfGuruJeff View Post
Please let this be the time your car runs sustainably for at least a year or two without any problems!!!
For real but hopefully longer. U have come a long way and its time u get to enjoy her
bboylocob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 10:39 AM   #2549
KillerBMotorsport
NASIOC Vendor
 
Member#: 198281
Join Date: Dec 2008
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Virginia
Vehicle:
2005 WRX/STi
WRB of course

Default

What was the outcome with the motor, was the block gaurd installed, or is it as-is? I don't recall what the final outcome was on that.

Glad you hear she's running and ready to be enjoyed!
KillerBMotorsport is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-11-2013, 11:34 AM   #2550
explicithero
NASIOC Supporter
 
Member#: 15893
Join Date: Feb 2002
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: P-Burgh
Vehicle:
2004 STi
The color of the burgh

Default

I believe he is pulling the block out and having that done now. He wanted to get the hydra in there first then pull the block have that done and be ready for this coming spring summer.
explicithero is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
VF37 Twin Scroll Turbo and New Tomei Twin Scroll headers/Up pipe arco SCIC Private Classifieds 11 10-22-2010 01:09 AM
Picture of my new Ultimate Racing twin scroll kit blowbyu24 Member's Car Gallery 682 08-24-2010 08:12 AM
VF37 Twin Scroll Turbo and New Tomei Twin Scroll headers/Up pipe arco Engine/Power/Exhaust 9 10-02-2009 01:04 PM
FS VA: JDM manifold, Twin Scroll kit, JDM Genome and more quadzilla Engine/Power/Exhaust 38 09-18-2008 10:22 PM
Pros and cons of twin-scroll turbo! Carisma Factory 2.0L Turbo Powertrain 59 07-04-2005 05:06 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:48 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2014 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2014, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.