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Old 10-02-2012, 04:04 AM   #176
Mike-easy
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Did the rebuild a few days ago with FEP encapsulated all around, and figured I'd give an update. Here's my tips:
-I agree Buna-N may be a better choice for the sensor seal as it didnt seem to be too hard or worn compared to the other rings I pulled out, and the FEP was difficult to get on. I used a "4 Piece Pick And Hook Set" I picked up from Harbor Freight for $1.00, to stretch it into place. There was a little deformation caused by the aggressive handling, but it appeared to seal properly, and so far its holding fine.
-The pick and hook set made it easier to get some of the original rings off their posts, but it is definitely doable without one.
-While trying to remove the hex bolt, I broke the terminal off the sensor attached to the back of the pump. I recommend pulling this sensor and the wires connected to it off before even removing the pump from the car, and leaving it off until reassembly to prevent damage as it had become brittle. I was able to fix the sensor using epoxy putty, and then sealing it back up with silicone, but I don't like having stuff ghetto rigged on my car.
-It would probably be a good idea to soak all the bolts with PB blaster before attempting this, and if you don't have a bench vise to hold the pump once its off the car, try to break as many of the bolts loose as possible while still mounted. (The pulley and Hex bolt were a **** to get off without anything holding the pump. Its very difficult to get the proper leverage on them. This is how I broke my sensor. When the bolt finally broke loose, I rolled the pump from all the torque I was putting on it, and smashed the sensor off even though I was working on a foam mat.)

When I purchased the car, the pump was already going out, and I was having to refill the reservoir every month or so, there were bubbles in the reservoir whenever I drove it, and fluid was pooling on top of the block. I had to constantly fight my steering at low RPMs, making navigating through parking lots and making U-turns a pain. My power steering would completely cut out mid turn, making it pretty dangerous to drive, as I never knew when I would have to muscle the wheel around to keep from understeering into other cars. After the rebuild all my problems appear to be solved. I haven't checked for leaks since re-installing on Saturday, but I will update should I find any in the future.
So far I'm very pleased with my results, and my only real complaint would be about breaking my "Power Steering Pressure Switch", but this can be easily avoided with a little care.

Here's a link to the pick and hook set:
http://www.harborfreight.com/4-piece...set-66836.html

And here's a link to the bearings I used. I only read good things about Nachi bearings when looking for a replacement:
6203-2NSE Nachi Bearing 17x40x12 Sealed C3 Japan Ball Bearings: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific6203-2NSE Nachi Bearing 17x40x12 Sealed C3 Japan Ball Bearings: Amazon.com: Industrial & Scientific

Good luck!
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Old 10-25-2012, 07:21 PM   #177
Masher
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Default Pump or rack leaking?

Hi all, been following this thread a while, thanks a lot for all the helpful information and pictures.

My situation with an 04 STi with 70k miles is: I noticed some fluid leaking for a few months and only recently found it's the power steering fluid. After 4 months of no noticeable problems besides the slow leak, I started getting a plume of white smoke and burning oil smell each time after driving a bit and then cutting the engine. Only recently did I have complete loss of power steering and the reservoir is down to below minimum at cold. I don't see much if any fluid build up near the ps pump. Taking the pump apart, the o-rings seem to be in good condition and there's no caking dust or obvious leaks in the power steering pump.

I'm going to order o-rings to rebuild the pump, but now I'm concerned about where the fluid may be leaking from. What should I look for to see if it's the steering rack that is leaking?


edit: if anyone is in the Austin area and needs o-rings, go to Austin Seal Company on Business Dr off Burnet. I got double of all the required o-rings (buna-n) for $4.50 and the lady who helped me was awesome.
I couldn't find the seal or the bearing at any of the major auto parts stores in Austin including Autozone, O'Reilly's, and Carquest. I've decided to rebuild the pump without replacing those two items, since they seem to be in good condition.
FYI, a remanufactured pump is cheapest from Autozone for $136 plus $26 core charge. O'Reilly's costs $136/$40 core, and Carquest costs $152/$57 core.

edit 2: Hey great thread guys, lots of useful information about the ****ty power steering setup in our cars. Turns out some things should be left to the professionals though...

Following this and other threads about power steering problems, I took apart my power steering pump and rebuilt it with new o-rings (about $5 and 4-6 hours of work if you go slow and without the right tools) and replaced the clamps on 6 of the connections on the power steering hoses (I think there are 8 total but I ran out of screw-type hose clamps). After all that, it turns out my high pressure hose is leaking, spitting fluid onto the turbo and exhaust, causing the burning smell and loss of power steering.

Checked with a local shop, they called around and couldn't source a replacement high pressure hose. They quoted $320 from the Subaru dealer. I checked with Autozone and O'Reilly, neither has the OEM part available (might be available as part of a complete setup, but didn't check for that). So now I'm going to let the shop rebuild the power steering high pressure hose, which apparently involves welding the line, for about $150.


Last edited by Masher; 10-29-2012 at 12:44 PM.
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Old 11-09-2012, 06:08 PM   #178
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Default Inlet to PS not sitting flush

Long story short the advance auto part o-rings did not work for the given I.D/O.D/ thickness given on here. The PS inlet would not sit flush, which still allows air into the PS system. My stock O-Ring was not to bad, so i put it back in. For some reason the PS inlet still will not sit flush.

Also sorry for dumb question but can you still drive with the PS having air in it? (understand it is not ideal and may damage the pump)

Thanks
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Old 11-09-2012, 07:05 PM   #179
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Will

Advance should have a multi pack of air conditioning o rings. Most of the time they are green. They are behind the counter so you need to ask for them. If they are sized I think you are looking for a #14, that being said I'm not sure year your car is. So get the multi pack and match one up to your stock o ring the best that you can. Get a little fluid on the oring and be gentle when your pushing the elbow back into the pump. You should feel the ring seat. To test your fitment take the oring off and see if it sits flush, you may just be pinching the oring and its not seating correctly.
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Old 11-09-2012, 08:06 PM   #180
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I have a 2008 STi; I will get the multi-pack and try that. This simple O-Ring r2 has turned into a nightmare...
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Old 11-09-2012, 08:30 PM   #181
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Will007 View Post
I have a 2008 STi
Quote:
Originally Posted by 68Cadillac View Post
Master O-ring & Part Replacement List
for
Powersteering Pumps
found on:
SAAB 9-2X AERO (2005, 2006)
SUBARU IMPREZA WRX (2004, 2005, 2006, 2007)
SUBARU IMPREZA WRX LIMITED (2006, 2007)
SUBARU IMPREZA WRX STI (2004, 2005, 2006)
SUBARU IMPREZA WRX STI LIMITED 2007
SUBARU IMPREZA WRX TR (2006, 2007)
I think I found your problem.
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Old 11-10-2012, 03:47 PM   #182
Will007
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My problem was lack of attention to detail... The bracket holding the electrical connector i had put "under" the inlet, not on top. This caused the non-flush condition. I bought the multi-pack, found a good o-ring and put the bracket where it goes. At first i saw fluid seeping from under the inlet flange, i adjusted it and now it is all good. Thank you once again to everyone how put work into this thread... My advice, don't forget where the bracket goes or you will go mad.
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Old 11-10-2012, 10:40 PM   #183
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Has anyone replaced the high pressure hose as part of service on their power steering system? I installed one from Chase Bays and it leaks like crazy: http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/show...&postcount=247

Can anyone provide insight as to what to do to fix this?
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Old 11-16-2012, 08:40 PM   #184
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Well so far I want to thank 68Cadillac for the great guide! I bought my 04 WRX a couple months ago and got the guy to knock off $500 for the PS not working, drove it home and found the reservoir empty. After i filled it up it was business as usual up until 2 weeks ago when i test drove it after flashing to stage 1. I came and parked her to find white smoke from the hood scoop and popped the hood to find the PS pump leaking from the halves. I won't get the parts until next week but i will be rebuilding this thanksgiving weekend.

I just wish McMaster-Carr would tell you how much they were going to charge you for shipping online before you placed your order... What was the normal ground shipping for you guys? Its coming from Atlanta to Virginia for me.
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Old 11-19-2012, 02:53 PM   #185
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MtlDrmCor View Post
I just wish McMaster-Carr would tell you how much they were going to charge you for shipping online before you placed your order... What was the normal ground shipping for you guys? Its coming from Atlanta to Virginia for me.
McMaster-Carr charged me $5.00 shipping for 2 o rings and a bearing to FL. Seems reasonable. RocketSeals on the other hand charged me $12 for ground shipping for the seal (weighs next to nothing).

I did the rebuild on a 2006 this weekend... I'll be posting my thoughts soon.
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Old 11-20-2012, 09:40 AM   #186
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I did the rebuild on my 2006 WRX this weekend. The car was making a nice buzzy/whiny noise when I turned the steering wheel until everything heated up. I also started to notice some shudder during turns at certain speeds. So far the noise is gone during cold start. The suddering seems to be less, but not yet completely gone (have to wait and see I guess).

Here are my comments/thoughts/suggestions...

I took some pointers from this thread on scoobymods.
Here are some recommendations:

Parts:
  • On my 2006, I used a second dash 013 o-ring. Although I used a dash 013, a dash 111 might be a better fit (same inner diameter, just a little thicker). (more on this in the pictures below)
  • If you decide to use Buna-N o-rings, NAPA's part numbers align with the dash numbers. It will be part number 7272xxx (where xxx is the three-digit dash number).
  • The original bearing has 1 sealed side and 1 shielded side. The inside of the stock bearing has a metal shield, not any form of rubber; the outside of the stock bearing is sealed with red colored rubber. I don't think the double-shielded one will work since I think the oil will run through it.
  • I used a half-and-half approach for the o-rings. I used FEP rings for the dash 136 and 037 rings and Buna-N rings for the rest.

Safety:
  • Make sure you have eye protection. This is especially true if you're going to replace the bearing and seal.
  • You'll be removing the retaining ring in front of the bearing and that thing might go flying.
  • You'll have to work to remove the (incredibly tight) seal. I used a screwdriver to pry up the seal and ended up bouncing it off the ceiling when it finally let go.
  • Never mind that everything is going to have ATF on it and you don't want that in your eyes
  • Without eye protection, either of these incidents could cause injury.

Tools:
  • If you plan to do this job quickly I think you need to have a vise. I do not have one and I managed to rig up just enough leverage to remove the pulley bolt and the side spring bolt, but I was not able to break the seal on the high pressure fitting or the hex bolt.
  • I have a 10mm hex bolt socket that seemed to fit. You'll need one of these or a big 10mm allen key.
  • For the pulley bolt I rigged a contraption from Home Depot's bulk electrician section. It's a big metal plate with 4 holes drilled into it for big half-inch bolts. The holes allow it to be used on the pulley. Two bolts into two holes on the pulley; two bolts to provide leverage for a breaker bar to keep the pulley from turning. Cost about $8 for the bar and bolts. Still would have been easier with a vise.
  • To remove the bearing, you'll need some retaining ring pliers to remove the ring that holds the bearing in place. I bought a pair of fairly low end ones from NAPA for around $16.00 that worked very well. Part “SER 1715”.
  • You certainly don't need one, but I used a puller tool to remove the original bearing from the shaft. I happened to have one so I used it.

Recommendations:
  • Mark the location of the alternator locking bracket with a marker before you unbolt the tensioner/remove the belt. This will allow you to get the belt back to the same tension when you're putting things back together.
  • I took the route of removing the alternator instead of unhooking the top radiator hose. Removing the hose would make things a bit easier (especially if your forearms/hands are big), but I didn't want to get into draining fluid, etc. To remove the alternator:
    • Have a small towel/old T-shirt handy
    • Unbolt and separate the electrical cable from the alternator
    • DON'T remove the green electrical connector. You don't need to and you'll just end up braking the tab off the connector (ask me how I know ).
    • Unbolt the long bolt on the right side of the alternator
    • Stick the towel/t-shirt under the alternator while you remove the long bolt
    • Once it's free, set the alternator somewhere on top of the engine. I put mine on top of the area of the intercooler connector to the intake manifold.
  • I do agree with the scoobymods thread that if you can find a 12mm flex socket (with the 12mm hole attached directly to the flex joint), it would help to remove the PS Pump bracket's rear bolt. I used a normal 12mm socket and a flex adapter, but I did have a bit of trouble getting the socket onto the bolt.
  • To that end, I loosened the bolt that is right above the rear bracket bolt. (It holds a bracket with a bunch of wires and hoses. By loosening this bracket's bolt, you'll have more room to work with when going after the rear bracket bolt.)
  • After you unbolt the two halves of the pump, be careful when disassembling the pump internals. There are two small bits of plastic between the two outer metal rings. I have no clue what these two things do, but they could easily be lost or broken.
  • When removing the seal
    • Another reminder about wearing eye protection. I good a good chuckle when the seal finally popped free and bounced off the ceiling.
    • Take care not to scratch up the metal surface or the new seal might not seal properly.
    • I think the most effective tool will be a medium size flat head screwdriver. Work your way around the rim of the bearing opening, prying upward. This sucker is tight. Before settling on this approach, I scraped and cut away enough rubber material to see that there is metal inside the stock seal. The trick is getting a good surface of pressure against the back side of that seal.
    • Also, it might help to bang some section of the seal down. This might disrupt the seal and make it easier to pry against the higher section.
  • When tapping the bearing onto the shaft, use a 16mm closed wrench and a socket to only tap on the inner ring of the bearing.
  • When tapping the shaft into the pump:
    • Use the old bearing to get started (don't go so far that the old bearing gets stuck).
    • Then use an 8mm socket on a driver or extension to finish the job. I found an 8mm socket was big enough to put pressure on both the inner and outer ring of the bearing.
    • Make sure to tap it on far enough to clear the retaining ring groove.
  • When reassembling the pump's guts
    • Make sure you put the outer ring into the pump's front half so that the spring goes through the hole in the outer metal ring.
    • Let the little metal rod guide everything. There are notches or holes in all pieces to ensure alignment and will keep the two halves from going together if it's not in the right place.
    • After you put the outer ring into the pump's front half, Put the two little plastic pieces into their notch. Position the pump half so that the square groove is at the bottom then put in the black piece then the white piece. After that you can install the inner ring then the rotor and vanes, but keep the square notch to the bottom so gravity holds those little plastic bits in place.
    • While bolting 'er back together, make sure you can still turn the shaft.
  • If you want to clean the PS pump bracket, don't bother with any kind of plastic brush, it will just get gummed up. I couldn't find my metal brush and ended up just putting dish soap on the part and rubbing it around with my finger. Believe it or not my thumb was more effective than an old tooth brush.

Impressions of the job:
  • I'm not a mechanic by any stretch, but I have more tools than I should have. I have a bunch of different socket sets with breaker bars, which I think will be necessary if you don't have an impact wrench. Some of the bolts are pretty tight.
  • I definitely hit the “I need to take a break before I break something” point a few times. Even so, I did break the clip off my alternator's electrical connector.
  • In terms of dollars spent, I came out ahead I'm sure. $25 to McMaster, $18 to RocketSeals (should have just run up to CarQuest). About $20 at Home Depot (metal bar/nuts for the pulley, 17mm and 19mm sockets). About $30 at NAPA (Buna-N O-rings and retaining ring pliers).
  • In terms of cost of labor, it's more of a draw. It took me several hours of work. I wasted a lot of time struggling to rig up tools to try to break bolts loose including a trip to Home Depot. It also took time to remove the old seal.
  • Then again, I like a challenge and I enjoy working on mechanical bits so it was a nice project. I got to use a little ingenuity and have a feeling of pride that I worked on the internals of this small bit of my car.
    If you don't have the time to mess around, the rebuilt pump is an option to consider.

Pics:

2006 pump. Notice the extra opening when compared to 68Cadillac's pictures.



Here's where I marked the tensioner before unbolting things.


Here's where I set the alternator while working on the rebuild.


Shot of the inside shield of the bearing



My technique for getting the new bearing on the shaft. One hand like this. Other hand = hammer.
That's the bearing with a 16mm wrench and a socket on top (socket larger than the shaft, of course).


Demonstration of puller tool to remove the bearing (this is actually the new bearing after I set it... just demonstrating the set-up. Not a necessary tool for this job, but what the heck. Unfortunately it was not long enough to help putting the bearing ON, but it made removal of the old one super easy and drama free.


Here's a shot of the contraption I used to counteract the pulley's rotation for removal. During re-assembly, I just used a socket extension to hold the pulley in place.

Last edited by WRXFanDave; 11-20-2012 at 12:12 PM. Reason: Updated comment about the bearing. I don't think we can use the "double shielded" bearing.
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Old 11-20-2012, 01:16 PM   #187
MtlDrmCor
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I just ordered mine Monday. Shipping was $5.57 to VA from GA with delivery tomorrow. I am going to attempt this over the holiday weekend. I'll let you know how it goes. Mine is leaking from the top/side. It isn't failing or making noises just showering down over my headers which makes a nice smoke cloud and smells terrible. I'm hoping it is just the main ring but while I'm in there I'm going to replace everything I can. Hopefully it doesn't give me a hard time. I certainly have enough information to figure it out now!
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Old 11-21-2012, 11:28 PM   #188
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WRXFanDave has a really creative way to stop the pulley from rotating but a lot of people have completed this rebuild and the method of stopping the pulley from rotating doesn't seem to be discussed much. How have you guys stopped it from spinning? I'm going to be starting to strip this down Friday so I'm looking for some other methods as options. Its the only part of this rebuild so far that has me scratching my head. Thanks!
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Old 11-22-2012, 08:42 AM   #189
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If you go the route of moving the radiator hose, you will have room to get a socket onto the pulley bolt. But the belt only offers so much resistance; the pulley will still turn, but it might be enough with a long breaker bar. I don't know if air tools would work even when the pump is off the car.

Without moving the hose, you can't get a socket onto the bolt. If you have a long 19mm (I think it's 19) wrench, you might also be successful. I did not have a non-socket wrench of the correct size to attempt loosening it while still bolted in (which would give the best leverage).

I don't know if I tried it when loosening it, but I was able to use an extension from a 3/8 socket set when tightening the bolt. It might work... the thing is that the pulley is about the same size as the pump and the contours of the pump are a bit odd.

Had another thought... If you cant find good leverage with just an extension... Find a socket that's about the same size as the holes in the pulley. Attach a breaker bar or socket wrench to that socet. Put the socket through a hole and tie the handle of the breaker/wrench tightly to the outer edge of the pulley through one of the other hole (thin twine or an old shoelace should work... Loop it several times). I bet that would work if conventional methods fail.

Last edited by WRXFanDave; 11-22-2012 at 09:15 AM. Reason: had another thought.
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Old 11-24-2012, 10:51 PM   #190
MtlDrmCor
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I started and hopefully finished my rebuild today. To get the pulley off I placed a float through one of the holes in the pulley on its left side and used a breaker bar on the nut while it was still on the car. It came off really well. After I took it off the car and looked everything over it was only the top line that was leaking. It is the line that has the 10mm bolt holding it on, not the banjo bolt line. I replaced that seal and cleaned everything up. I did break that 10mm bolt while putting everything back together but advanced auto had one so that wasn't as bad as it could have been. I cranked the car up but I can't drive it until Tuesday when my exhaust gets in. I didn't know UPS took Friday off on top of Thursday or I would have paid more on shipping to get it here on time. I'll update this when I get a few drives in to test out that seal.


***EDIT - So far It has been holding until tonight. I noticed the smell and checked for leaking. I think it is from around the hollow pressure bolt that 68Cadillac also had a leak from. Guess i need to torque it down some more as well. I will update this post again once i know what is going on.

Last edited by MtlDrmCor; 11-28-2012 at 09:04 PM.
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Old 12-23-2012, 04:41 PM   #191
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Subscribed!

Just ordered o-rings for mine due to it pooling on the block as well.. hopefully the rebuild goes well.
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Old 12-24-2012, 12:49 AM   #192
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Anyone looking for a set if orings seal and bearing send me a PM. I decided to go the replacement pump route.
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Old 12-26-2012, 08:43 PM   #193
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 68Cadillac View Post
The biggest issue we have after the rebuild seems to be the double crush washer leaking. Perhaps we shouldn't reuse it.


Double crush washer of problems.
Awesome thread. The OEM double crush washer (a.k.a., "gasket") is part number 34621ac024 for a 2005 STI and runs about $3.50.
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Old 12-28-2012, 12:11 PM   #194
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Default Pump Cannot be Rebuilt?

I finally gave in and just replaced my OEM original pump with a little over 74,000 miles with a new OEM pump. The engine was pulled out and rebuilt about 2,500 miles ago. I replaced the pump due to surging/whining and general unpredictability I saw during daily driving, and a couple autox and track days. This issue was detected shortly after the engine was put back together, though there was no visible leakage of fluid.

Then, I decided to take a crack at rebuilding the original pump based on this awesome thread. The pump was covered in grime, and it looked like the housing was leaking at the bottom as parts of the long bolt holding the pump to the bracket were covered in fresh fluid.

I disassembled the entire housing/pulley/vanes/etc. None of the o-rings with the exception of the suction o-ring appeared to be damaged or cracking. Once I removed the pulley, I noticed a crack at the 12 o'clock position on the outer part of the housing facing the radiator. There was a lot of grime and build up around the shaft seal - caked in pretty good. It looks to me like it had been damaged from a heavy blow. I don't think this housing should be re-used , but curious if others would deduce the same based on this explanation and my shabby iPhone pictures.


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Old 12-29-2012, 02:52 AM   #195
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Disclaimer: I'm a newb. From the pictures, the crack looks fairly superficial to me (doesn't look like the crack goes as deep as where the bearing sits, maybe not even past the retaining ring.). There's plenty of crud on the top of the pump so it doesn't look like the crack is the reason it's leaking fluid. If you can tell that the crack goes in as deep as the bearing then maybe I wouldn't use it. I'm thinking the main force is rotation so as long as the bearing and shaft are supported, you should be ok (I wouldn't think rotation of the pulley would cause the crack to fail... of course there's the tension from the belt too). The only other thought is the crack might prevent you from removing the bearing and installing a new one. You might need to use a hammer to bend it out of the way.

[Edit: seems like you're looking to either keep it as a back-up or sell it?] From a practical standpoint, I just don't see a downside to just trying the rebuild with the cracked housing. But since you have it all apart, just replace the o-rings even if they look ok. You're already in there; you can at least throw some Buna-N rings in for under $10. If it works you fixed it on the cheap. If it doesn't work you're going to need a new/rebuilt pump... which is what you have to do if you don't try the rebuild. Downside is what, $25 bucks (orings, seal, bearing)? Upside is $150 or more (if the cracked housing holds after the rebuild). And now you know all the tricks to pull the bracket so it shouldn't take very long if you do need to swap it out.

Last edited by WRXFanDave; 12-29-2012 at 02:58 AM.
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Old 01-06-2013, 12:42 AM   #196
nopiston
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I completed the rebuild of my power steering pump on my '04 STi today thanks to the info from all the generous people in this thread. I did notice the shaft didn't turn as freely as I would have thought even though the new bearing felt fine before I installed it. Maybe that's normal. Unfortunately, I didn't check the main shaft resistance originally before disassembly. Just an observation.

Also, and it could be my imagination, but it feels like the steering requires slightly more steering effort than before the rebuild. I have no leaks that I see, no shuddering, and no bubbles in the new fluid. Is that possible or no?

Other than that, so far, so good!

Last edited by nopiston; 01-06-2013 at 12:49 AM.
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Old 01-06-2013, 10:24 PM   #197
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Well, thinking about it now, I think the resistance I felt of the shaft upon installing it and assembling the pump was the new oil seal which purposely drags.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:44 PM   #198
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nopiston View Post
I completed the rebuild of my power steering pump on my '04 STi today thanks to the info from all the generous people in this thread. I did notice the shaft didn't turn as freely as I would have thought even though the new bearing felt fine before I installed it. Maybe that's normal. Unfortunately, I didn't check the main shaft resistance originally before disassembly. Just an observation.

Also, and it could be my imagination, but it feels like the steering requires slightly more steering effort than before the rebuild. I have no leaks that I see, no shuddering, and no bubbles in the new fluid. Is that possible or no?

Other than that, so far, so good!
Do you get any whining from the pump during turning?

I rebuilt the pump in my 04 STi and it whines louder than originally and I'm still burning ps fluid (ATF), though maybe only a few drops each drive (no drips on the ground). When I took the pump apart, there was a decent amount of wear on the internals because it ran without proper fluid for too long.

So I ordered a remanufactured pump from Autozone and this is what I get in the mail after waiting a week:



What a mess. The bag was open, not sealed, the pump and manual are covered in ps fluid, and the black paint is flaking. They did include new o-rings at least. Needless to say, it's going back to the local Autozone. It came in a white box with Duralast labels, part 5610. Reading up on it, AZ reman'd parts are hit and miss and the companies they use to reman their parts are flaky and constantly changing. Now I'm going to price a pump from the dealer.

My warning to everyone is, be careful what you read on the internet, seek the advice of professionals if you don't know what you are doing. What started as a leaking hose is now going to cost me an additional ~$300 and a few weeks of downtime on my car.
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:48 PM   #199
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You might give these guys a call. They've worked out well for me in the past:
http://www.saabandsubaruparts.com/
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Old 01-09-2013, 01:52 PM   #200
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Originally Posted by nopiston View Post
You might give these guys a call. They've worked out well for me in the past:
http://www.saabandsubaruparts.com/
Thanks but I've had enough of used parts and messing with the steering on my car and potentially damaging the rack. I'm going to check with dealers and if the pump is under $300, I'm buying one.
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