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Old 12-23-2015, 03:14 PM   #1
reide181
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Default The Art of Automotive Photography. (A How-To Manual)

The Art of Automotive Photography.

_______________________

Chapter 1 - Introduction.
Chapter 2 - The Basics - Terminology, ISO, Aperture, Shutter Speed, Focus, Software, Post Processing.
Chapter 3 - Photography’s #1 Trick: The Circular Polarizer.
Chapter 4 - Photography in Motion.
Chapter 5 - "Clear Hood" Mod.
Chapter 6 - Light Painting and Long Exposure (coming soon...)

to be continued...

_______________________

Thread Note: All photos should be linked to my Flickr. Here in this thread, the photos are all posted at a maximum of 800px for faster loading times (except this first one). To view the hi res version simply click the photo you want to see.



Introduction.

It seems that I get questions about different photographic techniques in my build thread and on other various sites. I always wanted to write my own manual for basic photography knowledge… so here is my attempt. Here I can provide my input into the very basics of how certain shots work, how you can shoot some yourself, and then have this in a common location that many people can access as a tool for better photography. I'll go over some settings and later provide examples.

I want to start by saying I am not a professional. This is not a write-up on how to use fancy equipment to achieve amazing photos. This is about shooting with what you have and writing to the hobbyists! I'm sure you can even try this on some of the modern phones with the adjustable settings, but let’s focus on DSLRs for now.

Throughout, this series I will use primarily my own photos as examples. If other photos are used, proper credit will be provided. (lesson #1 LOL)

Photography is a great expression of emotion using... really anything as a subject. For myself, cars seem to take my main focus!

End Notes:
At the end of the day, these write-ups will just give you a base. You just need to play around and find your own sweet spot. Head out with friends and go shoot! This is how I learned. Goodluck!

-Reid (@reide181)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/reidelattrache
https://www.facebook.com/ReidElattrachePhotography/
reidelattrache.tumblr.com

Build Thread: http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/show....php?t=2665770
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Last edited by reide181; 01-11-2016 at 05:02 PM.
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Old 12-23-2015, 03:14 PM   #2
reide181
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The Basics.

Plenty of terms will be flying around here so I wanted to clarify a few. If these post continue, I will probably update as terms come up!

Subject Positioning or “rule of thirds”: This is the very first thing all photographers should learn. Your pictures will be forever boring if you continuously put the subject in the very middle of the photograph… Pay attention to your background.

If you think of the photo as a grid, try and put the subject on one of the lines or (if it is small enough) try and get the subject on a crosshair. This is just naturally pleasing to the eye. It is not MY opinion, this is something you’ll need to see for yourself. Go to your favorite photographers profile, about 75% of his/her photos will be composed with this rule.




When I shoot, I tend to just off set the subject to one side. This is especially important while shooting rolling shots. I'll touch on that more during that chapter.

You can break this rule as you feel fit, use the photo of the P1 in the airplane hanger (below) as an example.

Depth of Field (DOF): This refers the the amount of the photo that is in focus and directly relates to aperture (below). I will use examples here and then more below.

Short/Shallow DOF:


Long/Deep DOF:


Exposure: This refers to the general elements of a single shot or single exposure. The word comes from the sensor being ‘exposed’ or opened to the environment. This can be a measurement of time. But, when most commonly used and how I will be using it to explain, exposure would mean the light on a photo. Overexposed photos are too bright and underexposed photos are too dark. A proper exposed photo should have equal parts lights and dark, or basically not be too dark or light. A lot of this is up to the photographer and their style, so there isn’t much to understand here other then the terms and what it means. This way I can use it to explain other topics.

How and Where to Focus: This is a very easy concept but should be recorded. For cars, you should tend to focus on the headlights or taillights. For people, you should always focus on the eyes. Headlights are eyes for cars.

A lot of first timers assume to become or act like the pros, they need to manual focus. You don't. Auto focus will be a million times faster and more accurate than you'll ever be. Now, I choose to have a single focus point in the middle of the frame. I will have the camera auto focus there, then move the camera into position before the shutter button is fully pressed.

When auto focus doesn't feel like working with me and I absolutely need to manual focus, I take my time make sure to get the focus right. Nothing sucks more than opening a photo in Lightroom or Photoshop and realizing the focus is off. There is a reason for the fancy screen and a zoom button on the back of your camera.... USE IT! Double check your photos and make sure the focus is on point before you leave a shoot.


Understanding your camera.

In the following threads I’m going to be talking about ISOs, apertures, and shutter speeds… The easiest why to understand why you need to have your settings a certain way is to understand what is happening in your camera. Again, basics here. 99 percent of photographers dial in their settings in this order:

What happens with you take a photo?

Cameras work via a little yet amazing sensor on the inside of a camera body. When you take a photo, this sensor is exposed to the environments for a certain amount of time. During that time, the sensor records what it sees, light. This sensor has a set sensitivity to light (ISO), an amount of time it can be exposed to light (shutter speed), and the size of the hole in the lense which the light gets to travel into the sensor (aperture). Adjusting these measurements will give you different effects. The sensor is covered by a shutter, which then opens and closes at the set time.

ISO:
This in the modern day equivalent of film speed or sensitivity. Before digital cameras, film needed to be purchased at certain sensitivities depending on how much available light was going to be in the shot. You soon find out; these camera settings are all about manipulating lighting into the camera.

The lower the ISO number (most cameras 50 or 100) the less sensitive the camera sensor is to light. Similar to how film used to be less sensitive to light. This is first to be set because once set for a specific location, 99% of the time is won’t need changed. There isn’t a set ISO number for a set environment. This is where you’ll need to learn to read the light. Figure out what works best for you. Lower ISO will require a slower shutter speed FOR THE SAME photo at a higher ISO. All the camera settings reflect the others.

Low ISO ~(smallest-250) - bright environments; sunny days, outside.
Mid ISO ~(300-600) - sunny days, inside or sundown/up outside.
High ISO ~(600-largest) - inside dark settings, outside dark settings

These are VERY BASIC examples. It is impossible for me to tell YOU what exact number you will need. Play around.

General rule: if you realize your shutter speeds are getting to slow, raise the ISO.

Now… high ISO comes with side effects. The higher the ISO, the higher the noise in the photo. The same photo at ISO 100 and ISO 500 (adjusted so both are exposed properly), ISO 500 will be a noisier photo. On most modern digital cameras, these effects are really noticeable to the average person until you start to get above 800. The more expensive the camera, generally the better the sensor, the less noise you’ll get at a given ISO.


(photo credit)

Aperture:
This is the size ‘hole’ or opening in the lenses when the photo is taken. This setting is strictly referring to a function in the lens and not the camera body. Designated by f-stops (f/1.4, f/8, f/22, ect…), the smaller the number the bigger the opening in the lens.


(photo credit)

Think about it this way, a larger opening in the lens will let more light into the camera, therefore hitting and recording off the sensor. The sensor records the picture, some magic happens… and now you have a photo. The smaller the opening in the lens, the less lighting coming in. So you probably think, I always want the most light, right? Not all the time.
With a large opening (small f-stop), you get more depth of field (DOF). Which again is very cool and adds to the beauty of a photo. But sometimes you’ll want to have more parts of the photo in focus, for example landscapes and rolling shots.

Small f/stop (DOF – Blurry background):



Large f/stop (everything is in focus):


Shutter Speed:
This should be the final setting before a photo. Most likely you will be changing this every few photos. Shutter speed is the length in fractions of a seconds (1/20, 1/125, 1/4000, ect.) that the shutter remains open when the camera takes a photo. So, the larger the amount of time the shutter is open, the more light that gets to the sensor, and the brighter the photo.

The shutter “fires”. So when you press the “shutter button” the photo is taken. See where all these terms come from?

In terms of light: Generally, at night, shutter speeds will be slower because there is less light available. The sensor needs more time to ‘soak’ in the light. Where as in the middle of the day, there is much more light. If the shutter is open too long your photo would turn out white; if the shutter is open to little your photo turns out black.

In terms of motion: If you want to freeze action, you’ll need a fast shutter speed. 1/4000th of a second is fast… very fast. You only capture 1/4000th of a second of the subject. This would apply to sports or other subject you want to freeze. If you want to show the motion, then a slow shutter speed would apply. Think of a slow shutter speed as a photo over a certain amount of time. I’ll explain with the photos below:

Fast shutter speed (freezes the action; check out the mud particles captured mid flight):


Slow shutter speed (notice the lights of the cars driving by over time, “painting” the photo):


You guys should all understand this one: the Subie gauge flip.


All these settings are related and depend on the other. Everything is a compromise. Lower aperture, means the shutter speed needs to speed up. Higher aperture, means the shutter speed needs to be slower.



Software and Post Processing.
I won't talk too much on post processing because this is going to be all personal style and choice. I would like to say one thing that I learned by myself really fast, and wish I knew from the beginning. On the travel to becoming a better photographer, you learn less is more when it comes to post processing or editing. I see too many people using heavy filters and HDR look alike to "enhance" their photos. You are only ruining the beauty of the subject! Less is more! 95% of my photos have a little RAW sharpening and color enhancement. Otherwise, they are "straight out of the camera". I tell beginners, to focus their learning more on getting it right in the camera rather than fixing it on the computer.

My software of choice is Adobe Photoshop (PS) and Lightroom (LR). Any version will do fine! I've used CS4-CS6 and other than some small updates and bug fixes, most of the functions remain the same. (and thank God, I would be so frustrated if Adobe re-worked the interface after learning how to use it all these years)

Photoshop is the do-all power house of photo editing. For beginners this can be a little scary BUT, since it has been the industry standard in digital photography since the digital camera first came out, there are a million how-to's on youtube and the internet. I'm a product of internet learning.

Lightroom is a newer app in the Adobe line up, only being a few years old. Again, this quickly became an industry standard. NOT replacing PS, but adding to your workflow.

PS is a single photo app, where LR you can upload hundreds of photos and edit them instantly all at once. LR has the basics in enhancement, and for most of your photos this is where the post processing stops. Sometimes you'll need a little more manipulation to the photograph, and then PS comes into play. That is my typical workflow; upload ALL photos into LR, then export into PS for the final touch ups.

My uses:
PS for manipulating photos, changing what is going on. Removing poles and signs, lowering cars, removing reflectors, tinting windows, clearing license plates, removing facial imperfections, enhancing eye colors, ect.

LR for enhancing photos as a whole. Brightening backgrounds or subjects, adding contrast, boosting vibrance, ect.

Overall, know that PS can do everything LR can do, but LR can't do everything PS can do. LR is a lighter, faster, easier to use PS.

Buying:
Adobe software is VERY expensive, but chances of you paying full price are slim to none. You can buy an older version and still have an amazing software for around an 80% discount. Try Amazon. Some of you will fall into the student discount section, which again gives you about an 80% discount.

Recently, Adobe started offering a pay per month plan (to go along with our pay per month world....). Student and regular share the same beautiful $10 a month for the newest PS and LR. This is what I do. $10 a month for non-torrented, crack-free software with all the benefits... Yeah that's awesome LOL. You'll get a license for 2 computers. Thank about it this way; that's $120 a year. WAY less expensive than paying even the discounted 80%. By the time you make up the $250 for the 80% discount, that's over 2 years and a new version will be out anyway. Then with your fully purchased version, you'll need to pay $60-$100 to update to the newest version.

Download here: https://creative.adobe.com/plans


RAW vs. JPEG (with a side of PNG).
This is a very heated and highly debated subject. But, I will make this very clear from the beginning. Shooting RAW gives you a higher quality photo. Period.

For those that are still reading, good. Let's discuss. I'll start with a JPG file. This is an industry standard for compression. If there is a computer, phone or website that doesn't support this file, then they won't last a minute. All the photos you see here, have been converted to JPG to post on the internet.

After reading above, you know what happens in your camera as you press the shutter button. Now, that image recorded on the sensor gets turned into digital language and fancy computer talk... Your camera can process this itself and immediately turn this into a readable JPG file and be done with it. Saving you tons of space on your cards. But your camera is now in control of that final image. It chose a filter (the Nikon or Cannon Corps did) and saved your photo in that state forever. It probably lightened show shadows and boosted saturation.

Let's say you take this JPG file and upload it into LR. When you adjust values, you are adjusting (and ruining) the quality of the photo. A JPG will be at it's highest quality right after being compressed.

A RAW image is that fancy computer language, UNPROCESSED and left for the photographer and computer to change and manipulate. Let's be real. What do you think has more processing power, your computer or your camera? Your computer. You'll have a more accurate photo with RAW files. RAW files will be bigger because they contain the full story of everything that happened when you pressed that shutter button. Everything is left alone and up to the user to adjust before permanently saving.

When you have this control, you can remove unwanted noise, and add beautiful more accurate colors to your final photo. You also have more room for error (although learn to not depend on this). You will have far more adjustability for white balance, exposure, and color before increasing noticeable noise.

When should you shoot JPG/RAW?

Up to you. Some people only shoot JPG. I can't tell you what to do. I can only speak the facts and then make you aware that more people can't tell the difference. Until you zoom in or print a 20x30 photograph, most people can't tell the difference between RAW and JPG. And I don't mind being honest and saying we live in a digital world. Facebook, Instagram, txt messages. All these mediums (for now) have such a small footprint in the photography world. The potential of your fancy DSLRs will not be reached until you are printing billboards.

For me, I want the highest quality photograph. Shooting RAW, post processing and then converting to compressed file (JPG or PNG) works for me. I need to buy large hard drives to store these files. My camera card is 64gb and I still empty it after every 2 or so shoots.

What sold me on RAW was the ability to heavily reduce noise levels in a photograph. Once I saw how little noise I could get from a RAW image, I was sold.

My typical workflow, I shoot JPG and RAW images side by side. Each shot is recorded into the camera as both. That way, I can use the JPG files to quickly sort through angles and shots I want to save. Then, use the RAW files as my file to upload into LR. Files get converted to JPG when I'm done editing. For many website uploads I use PNG. PNG files are less effected via compression (like Facebook) rather than a JPG. Again, small difference.

Last edited by reide181; 12-25-2015 at 04:50 PM.
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Old 12-23-2015, 03:15 PM   #3
reide181
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Photography’s #1 Trick: The Circular Polarizer.

Circular polarizers are arguably the easiest and cheapest way to get better photos. Have you ever worn polarized sunglasses? The sky looks crazy awesome right? But, look at the paint and glass of a vehicle. Reflections disappear and you can see right through the glass.

The circular polarizer gives the same effect depending on how you rotate the filter. It will clean your photos and even colors. Best way to describe it is with an example. Below you can see the same shot; one with a polarizer and one without.



These are priced anywhere from $20-$150, and worth every penny. I use Hoya filters because they are priced well for what you get. Quality filter at a midrange price.

Here is another example of how to use a circular polarizer for your benefit. Rotating the filter gives these various effects. The left shot was bringing the colors out of the side of the car (notice the dark, deep side windows) and the right photo was bringing the color out of the hood, windshield and headlights. For this photo, I took both shots and blended into one. This way you can clearly see both the top and side of the vehicle. The polarizer can only add the effect to one flat section at a time; vertical or horizontal. By taking multiple shots, you can get a very ‘complete’ shot. Now if I didn't use a polarizer, that photo would have neither of the polarized sections…. In that case, I would have had to darken the photo to expose for the car properly, leaving the background WAY too dark.



Here is the final shot:



Notice the lack of reflection in the windshield and side windows, along with the clarity in the headlights and windows on the building. No distractions in the paint, just very satin silver AMG awesomeness lol!


With bigger, flatter cars this effect looks awesome. IMO, it looks clean!

Last edited by reide181; 12-25-2015 at 02:22 PM.
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Old 12-23-2015, 03:15 PM   #4
reide181
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Photography in Motion.

Types of Motion Photography:
Most people categorize motion photography into 3 types:
1) Rolling or driving shots
2) Panning shots
3) Rig Shots

Rolling Shots:
Since, I don't personally have a rig or do I feel like buying or building one, my preference is rolling shots. Rolling shots are when the camera and subject are moving at the same speed when the photo is taken. These do not need to be at high speeds as they might suggest. 5-10 mph in a wide open empty parking lot works fine! My personal favorite is about 40-50 mph on a 2-3 lane wide highway during the golden hour or overcast days. If traffic is too busy during the golden hours before sunset, try super early in the morning as the sun rises.

Tip: Try to avoid direct and harsh sunlight when shooting. Pick an overcast day or shoot early morning or the "golden" hour just before the sun sets. Your colors and dynamic range will be much better.

Settings:
In order to get the full effect of motion, you'll need to slow the shutter speed down. Depending on the speed of the subject, I have shot around 1/15th for about 20-30 mph and all the way to 1/60th for around 60mph. For some like myself, manual mode works great. This way I know all my shots are uniform. So, set shutter speed then adjust the other settings around that. My aperture tends to be smaller (larger f-stop number) so that I can get more of the vehicle focused. Your background will be blurry anyway. Shutter priority mode works great also! Set your speed and shoot.

Play with angles. Generally low profile cars (ex: exotics) look awesome with low angles and high profile cars (ex: EVOS, Subarus) look better at hood level. Unless of course you are trying to make a large cars look big, then shot low.

Tip: It bothers me when I see "rolling shots" with wheels that are half caught in motion. My rule of thumb, if you can still see spokes on the wheel, your shutter speed is too fast! PLEASE, get the full effect of motion! The wheels and background should be blurred by the motion. The wheels should look like they are non existent or at least see through.

We spoke about subject positioning above and I wanted to touch on that specifically for motion photography. Most of the time you want want to lead the subject (more empty background in front of the car). This gives the impression that immediately after the photo the car just took off! Although, I wanted to provide some photos where I did the opposite. For the panning shot examples I did the opposite, just because I wanted to show something behind the car; tire smoke, wet F1 rooster tails, ect...

Examples:
1/30, f/18, ISO 100


1/50, f/13, ISO 100


1/50, f/14, ISO 100


1/60, f/3.5, ISO 200


1/30, f/7.1, ISO 100


1/20, f/22, ISO 100



Panning Shots:
Panning shots are when the camera and subject are traveling at different speeds, mostly camera is stationary and the subject is at speed. The trick here is to match the speed of the vehicle traveling past as you pan or rotate your body. This is extremely popular simply for the fact this is the easiest kind of shot to 'setup'. You'll see a lot of these photos when cars are leaving shows, at race events, or just simply spotting a car driving down the road. I don't shoot these very often but they do have there uses.

Settings:
Panning, again, is all relative to what you are shooting. I shoot F1 cars at a higher speed than I shoot cars drifting. Same set up and settings as rolling shots apply but with fast shutter speeds.

Examples:
1/125, f/10, ISO 100


1/125, f/4.8, ISO 100


1/400, f/4.5, ISO 400


Rig Shots:
I'm going to keep this part short and touch the basics. Rig shots are a little tougher. Most rig shots are very slow speeds just barely moving the car. A lot of times, the car is off and people push the cars. Rigs consist of some sort of long arm, usually carbon fiber or aluminum, then suction cupped to the vehicle. These shots come out like the ones you see in car brochures. Post-editing is very heavy with this type of shot because you will need to remove the long arm that appears in the photo.

Settings:
Attach the rig in the desired spot. Take a photo of the car stationary so you can blend this into the motion shot for the most clear photo. Then proceed to use a very low shutter speed and push the car.

Many people make there own rigs. Here is a good DIY link: http://www.diyphotography.net/take-c...lized-car-rig/

Examples:
RAW image out of the camera before removing the rig (photo credit):


Some more examples: http://www.stanceiseverything.com/20...day-rig-shots/

Last edited by reide181; 12-24-2015 at 06:48 PM.
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Old 12-23-2015, 03:15 PM   #5
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“Clear Hood" Mod.

This one is a fun one! Super easy with basic Photoshop knowledge. I joke around and call it the “clear hood” mod because believe it or not, some people will actually ask if you have a clear hood….

Anyway, going with the theme of the other write ups, this will be short and sweet. You should use a tripod, but I’m going to be honest… For the photos below I didn’t. I’ll show you a little trick around that if you forgot your tripod at home. Just try to get the SAME photo of the car with the hood up and down. With a tripod of course, this is very easy. Just don’t move the camera! Keep the settings the same so the exposure is identical.

Import the photos onto your computer and open PS. You need to have both photos as layers in one PS file. So you could open one, and drag the other into the window. Now, with both files imported, highlight (select) both in the layer panel.

Edit > Auto-Align Layers…

You can see in the photo below how both layers are selected. Auto Align takes both photos and aligns them perfectly using the main features of the photo. This is extremely helpful if you didn’t have your tripod.



Next, duplicate the hood closed layer and erase the hood on the copy using a relatively soft brush size. For the other photo of the hood close, you can change the transparency. I like it around 40-60% .

You should have 3 layers, topmost should be the photo of the hood closed with the hood erased, middle should be of the hood closed but transparent, and the bottommost layer should be the photo of the hood open.



And the 3 shots should look like this:



Of course this is one way to do it, and a very simple example. As you practice you can highlight certain features by making them less transparent or more transparent.

Hopefully this helps!


Last edited by reide181; 12-23-2015 at 03:28 PM.
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Old 12-23-2015, 03:15 PM   #6
reide181
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Light Painting and Long Exposure.

coming soon...








Last edited by reide181; 12-23-2015 at 03:36 PM.
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Old 12-23-2015, 03:16 PM   #7
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Save.........
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Old 12-23-2015, 03:16 PM   #8
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Save............
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Old 12-23-2015, 04:51 PM   #9
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Wow dude. Amazing guide. So complete. This should be added to a sticky. Much better than the other guide! Awesome!
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Old 12-23-2015, 06:04 PM   #10
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Very nice!
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Old 12-23-2015, 06:07 PM   #11
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Very good read
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Old 12-23-2015, 07:12 PM   #12
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Subscribed
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Old 12-23-2015, 07:20 PM   #13
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Wicked! I always just went with what I got and kinda learned by myself. This makes it insanely easier for me to pick up on certain things I haven't had a chance to do yet.
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Old 12-24-2015, 12:31 AM   #14
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Great thread idea and awesome pics/write-ups. Subscribed for the updates

edit: Composition in the Evo vs YZFR1 shot is amazing

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Old 12-24-2015, 10:39 AM   #15
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Excellent write-up. Thank you for taking the time to put it together
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Old 12-24-2015, 11:40 AM   #16
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Amazing job Reid, awesome contribution!
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Old 12-24-2015, 11:49 AM   #17
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Fantastic thread and amazing pictures, you have inspired me to step up my game and get better .

Regards,
Aaron
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Old 12-24-2015, 01:29 PM   #18
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Thank you everyone for all the support! I'll continue to add topics as I find necessary. If anyone has any ideas for a write up or has any questions, please don't hesitate to shout them out!
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Old 12-24-2015, 01:34 PM   #19
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Thank you everyone for all the support! I'll continue to add topics as I find necessary. If anyone has any ideas for a write up or has any questions, please don't hesitate to shout them out!

Iphone photography tips? I have the squidcam lenses, that is probably the most i can afford for camera supplies.
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Old 12-24-2015, 01:54 PM   #20
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Iphone photography tips? I have the squidcam lenses, that is probably the most i can afford for camera supplies.
OK that's something I can do. Might just add a section to the post explaining ISO, aperture, etc...

Phones use the same settings but 9 times out of 10 it's fully automatic. If there is a certain app you can download with manual adjustments, that would be the best way to use the iPhone. I know my Samsung has manual settings built in!
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Old 12-24-2015, 01:56 PM   #21
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OK that's something I can do. Might just add a section to the post explaining ISO, aperture, etc...

Phones use the same settings but 9 times out of 10 it's fully automatic. If there is a certain app you can download with manual adjustments, that would be the best way to use the iPhone. I know my Samsung has manual settings built in!

I have an app that you can control focus, iso, shutter speed and white balance. Thats about it and ive tried to recreate the subie guage flip with the app but shutter speed only goes to 1/2 a second.
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Old 12-24-2015, 01:56 PM   #22
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Thanks for this! Great write up.
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Old 12-25-2015, 01:37 PM   #23
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Originally Posted by eustacer View Post
I have an app that you can control focus, iso, shutter speed and white balance. Thats about it and ive tried to recreate the subie guage flip with the app but shutter speed only goes to 1/2 a second.
With a phone this will be hard. You'll really need a steady hand. I'm also not sure a phone camera has the ability to go much slower than 1/2. You need to remember the designers didn't think phones would be mounted to tripods. They are meant to be hand held, and even 1/2 is extremely tough hand held.

Maybe search for an app that can mimic a long exposure.

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Thanks for this! Great write up.
Your welcome, hope it helps!
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Old 12-25-2015, 01:38 PM   #24
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Updated a "How and Where to Focus" in the Basics post, and wrote a little bit more about subject positioning in the Motion post!

Adding a "Software/Post Processing" and "RAW vs. JPG" as we speak....

Last edited by reide181; 12-25-2015 at 01:50 PM.
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Old 12-25-2015, 02:22 PM   #25
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A lot of people can benefit from this Reid, great write up. I vote for this to be stickied as well.

Thanks brother.
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