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Old 12-22-2012, 10:39 PM   #76
03wrxyllw
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Originally Posted by DuckStu View Post
The stock crankshafts are hardened and nitride coated.
.
i believe only the 09+ sti cranks are nitride coated
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:07 AM   #77
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Ok, here's my dad's story, still yet to be solved exactly what caused the 2nd failure. First, I've learned a lot and also many new questions have arisen since reading through this thread, so thanks for the input from those more experienced.

The setup: Dad's car is a 2003 WRX, it had about 230,000 miles on it. It had homemade up pipe, downpipe, axle back with cobb stage II flash from 2004 and a mbc set at peak of 16psi with Walbro 255 lph pump, stock intercooler/injectors. Running pretty good until mom broke dad's car. haha She was driving up the mountain grade from Bakersfield to Tehachapi in heat of the summer with some girlfriends in the car and was passing a slow truck in 5th gear when it lost power. It died as she was pullign off the road. Had it towed home. Dad was able to start it and drove it (knowingly not smart, it was rough and running with very low power DUH). He finally bought parts and started the tear down. Results show crushed ring land on piston #3.

Rebuild: Wiseco .020" oversize forged pistons, new bearings seals and gaskets. Reused oil cooler, oil pan, just "cleaned them really good" (obviously, since reading this post, probably not a great idea). He had the rotating assy balanced with the flywheel and the machine work for oversized pistons done at Adams Machine shop in Lancaster, Calif. Adams cleaned up his heads, replaced all exhaust valves (I think they were pretty burnt and a couple may have been damaged from the piston damage, can't remember), heads were decked. Cometic head gasket was used. Thinking was compression was pretty close to stock since even though the thicker head gasket, the heads were decked. His turbo was spent at 230,000 so he bought the Blouch 16GXT and a new SPEC stock replacement clutch. Put some 30wt oil (not sure what the experts' opinion is on this choice) for the break in. So, it fired right up and dad said it sounded a little loud, probably just some ticking of the forged pistons and initial breakdown. He drove it the 100 mile roundtrip in early December to EAFB and home for like 3 days with no issues. Boost was at 7psi (wastegate spring), then after like 2 days, he turned it up to 16psi peak. He wasn't rippin' on it or anything. On Friday (day 4) in the morning going to work, he got about 5 miles from home (easily up to operating temp by now) and it started to make noise. He kept driving and hindsight says that was not smart. It got louder and louder and he finally stopped.
Teardown #2: So, after the mourning period was over (maybe a week later, haha) he pulled the motor and tore it open. Rod bearing on #2 looks like the worst. The rod itself has a blue colored hot spot right in the middle of it. The crank bearings are damaged too. Some very minor contact with the pistons to head contact.

So, what think ye? A couple things that made me nervous. Running a Blouch 16GXT with stock injectors on a cobb stage II tune with mbc. The other one is the 30 wt oil. He's old school and has built many Ford pushrod 289's/302's motors as well as a 914 Porsche motor 15 years ago so he mentioned wanting to make sure the rings sealed, so he ran the 30wt, saying synthetic oil can't do this very well because its so slippery. I get what he's saying but not sure its actually true. I can't say I've really heard what oil people run during the breakin period. My dad is pretty leary about the oil pump he got from the machine shop. He thinks it was defective. He's going to have the shop inspect it. The last thing I have is what I've read here about reusing the oil cooler.

Thoughts?
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:13 AM   #78
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Stock injectors max out on the stock turbo. Combine that with probably a old maf sensor and it was running lean and knocking like crazy.
Cometic gaskets are trash. Oem gaskets are the best.
Maf sensors should go 100k then be replaced.
Speculation, but I'm doubting the main bearing clearances were properly verified as well leading to low oil pressure at the rods.

You're dad made a lot of mistakes on that one. Bummer. Don't make another by reusing that oil cooler or oil pan.
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Old 01-02-2013, 09:37 AM   #79
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Stock injectors max out on the stock turbo. Combine that with probably a old maf sensor and it was running lean and knocking like crazy.
Cometic gaskets are trash. Oem gaskets are the best.
Maf sensors should go 100k then be replaced.
Speculation, but I'm doubting the main bearing clearances were properly verified as well leading to low oil pressure at the rods.

You're dad made a lot of mistakes on that one. Bummer. Don't make another by reusing that oil cooler or oil pan.
Well, the sheer speed of that failure makes me think something else is going on. The 30 wt oil isn't what caused it, it's likely that the oil pump could have been faulty considering the sheer rate of failure.
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Old 01-02-2013, 11:48 AM   #80
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It is bad enough to know we buy these cars new with tunes that makes knowledgeable people shudder. It is bad enough that there is no common repository of fundamental Do-and-Don't for driving them, preserving them, and most certainly, rebuilding them. It's like a test to sort ourselves through survival of the fittest.

Then comes a problem, or an upgrade, and the necessity for detail...

Sadly, people mechanically experienced in other platforms often do not understand that that experience does not directly apply to Subaru's turbocharged engines. And, because these experienced people are deeply invested in their prior abilities, they also do not listen to Subaru-specific advice nor seek it out. They "know what they're doing."

If one has a lot of time to kill, just Search "jet ski" in this forum. It is a long sad tale of one individual's journey through the very Bad Lands of this very subject.

jackiechan78's story about his dad's WRX is classic... full of any number of common errors that most often, or even always, leads to the same ending as that WRX, and jetski247's STi, among many others. But, perhaps because WE do not find BASIC TRUTHS important enough to itemize and color in bold red things many know are necessary facts, those who commit themselves to work on these cars seem to find a way to turn a deaf ear, a blind eye, and then eventualy blame Subaru when the inevitable bites them, again and again.

There are Stickys that are full of outdated info, with missing links to important data. But where is the Sticky where anyone can submit information to a continuing compendium of critical truths about Subarus in-general... critical truths about Tuning, Rebuilding Motors, Truth-vs-Myth, etc.

There's information in this thread that should never be lost... but it will be.
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Old 01-02-2013, 01:52 PM   #81
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well thanks for all the info as to why my rods went out after spending a lot of money to rebuild the motor after my wife siezed it think my biggest mistake was not buying a sti oil pump ...and having the crank polished and then using XP king bearings dont really think the tune had that much to do with it since i really had'nt pushed the car very hard as i was still breaking it in .i did a lot of reserch during the build ...but missed this thread as i did not have any bearing proplems for the first 234,000 miles...i really dont beat the car that much ..heck i was still on the stock org. clutch,i do a lot of free way driving . so seems like the best bet is to line bore the block,new crank new rods,and stock bearings,new oil cooler,pan,and a sti11mm pump.what do you suby wizards thinkwill that get it back on the road ,then jectors and a tune.
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Old 01-02-2013, 02:37 PM   #82
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well thanks for all the info as to why my rods went out after spending a lot of money to rebuild the motor after my wife siezed it think my biggest mistake was not buying a sti oil pump ...and having the crank polished and then using XP king bearings dont really think the tune had that much to do with it since i really had'nt pushed the car very hard as i was still breaking it in .i did a lot of reserch during the build ...but missed this thread as i did not have any bearing proplems for the first 234,000 miles...i really dont beat the car that much ..heck i was still on the stock org. clutch,i do a lot of free way driving . so seems like the best bet is to line bore the block,new crank new rods,and stock bearings,new oil cooler,pan,and a sti11mm pump.what do you suby wizards thinkwill that get it back on the road ,then jectors and a tune.

sir, welcome.

Do NOT get an 11mm pump.

The biggest mistake that people make is they think they need to open up the bearing clearances to some value or use larger clearance than stock bearings.
This just isn't true.

I believe I stated this earlier in the thread, but I'll say it again.
Used blocks always come up with very very large main bearing clearances when using most aftermarket bearings in STD size (upwards of 4 thou in many that we've checked). I honestly haven't measured any using stock OEM bearings so I don't know what they are coming out after a lot of use. So when people use King XP or ACL HX bearings, those clearances open up to 5 or 6 thou on the mains. Add in some crank polishing and we're talking another .5 thou giving you 5.5 to 6.5 thou main bearing clearance. Goodbye rod bearing oil pressure, hello failure!
That clearance is too big regardless of what oil pump and oil you use. If you were to find an oil pump big enough with a thick enough oil (90wt?) you'd never get any lubrication to your valve train.

People often lose sight of what the rest of the engine needs. They frequently get too hung up on rod bearing clearances and forget about mains, cams, buckets etc.

The main bearing clearance is the most important clearance in the engine. This is what I have figured out in my hundreds of engine builds. We pay extremely close attention to mains and rods and this is why we have zero bearing failures.

Running too large of an oil pump is death to your engine as well. I've had to fix a lot of engines where people put 11mm pumps on stock bottom ends and ate the bearings up by feeding them aerated, sheared, hot oil from being run at relief pressure their entire life of only 100hrs (Normally Aspirated EJ25's and EJ20's). One of the most important things to realize with these engines: They aren't V8's.

MAF sensors: Subaru engine management has gone from 16 bit to 32 bit in recent years for a reason: they are very overworked. The lack of available bandwidth has prevented subaru from using a "plausibility table" or "look up table" when checking the MAF sensor. They only use a high and low voltage threshold. What happens over time with MAF sensors is they start to report lower voltages for the same airflow. Often they also get laggy in response. Since subaru doesn't have a 'look up table' the verify that the MAF sensor is operating within a certain voltage range for that specific boost and rpm the ecu has no way of knowing that the readings from the sensor are incorrect. Over time, your WOT fueling starts to get leaner and leaner. I believe this is why the fuel maps are so rich from the factory. This is just speculation, but I believe Subaru has them programmed to run rich at WOT because they determined that if the sensor degrades over a certain period of time, the Long Term Fuel Trims will eventually exceed 15% triggering a "system to lean" code which will alert the user of an issue and eventually lead to the MAF being replaced. The actual AFRs at WOT would lean out over time, but still stay within a safe range because LTFT's and the extra margin they programmed. This would eliminate the need for a lookup table and save precious bandwidth for OBDII operations, DBW operations, DCCD, boost control, VDC, traction control, CAN communications etc etc. By "tuning" the richness out of the cars, we have limited the ability of the ecu to protect the engine. This is why I add in extra safety margin when dealing with the timing curves and the relationship between the DAM/IAM and the fuel map switch over.

We replace 4-6 MAFs a month on MY02-06 Subarus at the shop. That's just the cars I see at MY SHOP. This means MAF sales across the country should be very high right now, but I suspect they are not because people just don't change them when they should. I have seem them go from 80-130k miles. I don't think I've seen any keep their resolution any longer than that without just being strictly highway driven vehicles.

Usually the first indication of a failing MAF is a blown engine. Burnt valves and spun #2 or #4 rod bearings are the most common failure modes.
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Old 01-02-2013, 02:47 PM   #83
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^^^^^

Thanks for the good information.

<-wondering if blown engine was MAF related....?
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Old 01-02-2013, 03:16 PM   #84
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Maxwell's post is one of the best posts I've ever seen.

I'm buying a new MAF right now. Should I go OEM or is there a better aftermarket solution?
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Old 01-02-2013, 03:26 PM   #85
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MP thanks for the info ....can i ask you if you believe line boring the block and using oem bearings will work to get the bearing clearance back to spec ? of course i'm going to get a new oem crank and rods also.having trouble finding a wrx spec crank.i see some for 1.8,2.0,2.2 motors ...are they the same for the wrx 2.0 turbo motor? and are the rods the same too? Gads these little beasties are touchy...guess a new MAF is in order too.funny thing is the car is not getting mpg it was getting when it was newer.i guess the high milage could effect that.really did'nt get a whole tank through it after the rebuild ...only 450 miles
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Old 01-02-2013, 04:05 PM   #86
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Perhaps before replacing the MAF, more info on what the symptoms of a tired or old MAF are should be defined. My fuel trims are within 3% across the board and I clean my MAF with every oil change with MAF cleaner. A MAF sensor is very simple and there's not much chemically or physically to degrade it's accuracy other than dirt or corrosion. Dirt can be cleaned, corrosion can be prevented by cleaning it.

One wire is heated via a current to achieve a specific resistance, the other wire measures ambient air temperature. Between the two, you can calibrate the sensor to work as long as you have another known constant. Even with some breakdown in the hot wire element found in our cars, as long as you have an accurate O2 sensor, you should be able the scale the two together unless the wires are corroded, broken or coated with dirt, oil etc in which case you should see some problems with the maf scaling and should be noticing some knock. The part I don't understand is how a MAF can become laggy with age. There's absolutely 0 processing going on with a MAF, the only lag would be if the chemical composition of the wire itself causes the heat or resistance change to lag with voltage input. That wouldn't cause a lag in computation though but would cause the MAF readings to be inaccurate vs. the scaling values stored on the ECU. I think an old MAF only becomes inaccurate, ECU being equal there's no physical possibility for the MAF sensor to delay providing voltage readings because it's electricity and it travels at the speed of light which...is a constant.

The part where Max says the wires get old and the fuel trims over time increase to over 15 goes hand in hand though with people not properly monitoring their vehicles. I feel my MAF even with 110k miles on it but with a brand new 02 sensor yielding a 3% or less long term fuel trim...is completely fine. I pretty much drive everywhere with my carputer hooked up because I trusted a "professional" to tune and diagnose my car and once I decided to do a few logs, I realized I was knocking all over on a 700 dollar tune.

My best advice to anyone doing mods on their car is to at the very least, buy a tatrix cable and learn how to log even if they don't want to learn anything about tuning. SO many things can go wrong and it's all speculation until you have the logs or have the engine torn down. You can't trust any tuner to handle your car like you so learn how to verify their work. That's easy with tuning but really hard mechanically. I've rarely heard advice as good as Max's on the engine building topic so perhaps taking it to them for the re-rebuild is a good alternative.

Moving on,

I've also seen a lot of debate on what oil weight to use on a turbo subaru.

Some say 10w-40 but others say that's too thick causing improper flow and raising the oil pressure too high.

10W-30, but others say that sheers to 5w30 anyway.

Others still say 0w-30 saying the 0w will protect the pistons at cold start and you want more flow, not less for the rod bearings.

I've never heard a clear answer from an actual knowledgeable builder WITHOUT a gigantic history of customer engine failures.

Last edited by BrandonDrums; 01-02-2013 at 04:36 PM.
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Old 01-02-2013, 04:10 PM   #87
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MAF sensors are flyin off the shelves as we speak lol
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Old 01-02-2013, 04:13 PM   #88
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Thanks Maxwell Power for all this great information. I was wondering if it is good enough to just clean the MAF sensor or is it best to buy a new one?
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Old 01-02-2013, 04:47 PM   #89
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Thanks Maxwell Power for all this great information. I was wondering if it is good enough to just clean the MAF sensor or is it best to buy a new one?
I'm going to let Max respond since he has way more experience but I feel that as long as the wires aren't corroded, the MAF will operate correctly as long as it's clean.

I guess what Maxwell folks have seen is that MAFs get dirty and stay dirty causing them to also corrode. I believe most MAF's hot wires are made of Platinum (yes, the bling bling element) and the thermistor wire is usually a synthetic matierial.

However, I have no clue what ours are made of. I've been researching MAFs in general since Max posted about it. I'm cheap so I'm hoping to verify that I don't need to spend the 200 bucks to replace mine lol.
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Old 01-02-2013, 05:56 PM   #90
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I've also seen a lot of debate on what oil weight to use on a turbo subaru.

Some say 10w-40 but others say that's too thick causing improper flow and raising the oil pressure too high.

10W-30, but others say that sheers to 5w30 anyway.

Others still say 0w-30 saying the 0w will protect the pistons at cold start and you want more flow, not less for the rod bearings.

I've never heard a clear answer from an actual knowledgeable builder WITHOUT a gigantic history of customer engine failures.
FWIW, your particular MY allows 10W-40 down to -4F so I can't see it being too thick, especially in the summer in the Southeast. The only 0W-30 that I would use in any Subaru turbo (even stock) is one that meets European ACEA A3 specs for shear stability (like German Castrol).

IMO, people tend to think too much about the numbers on the bottle but they should also think about High Temp High Shear (HTHS) which will give you a better idea of how an oil will behave in an engine and it also has an effect on oil pressure. If you take two oils with the same kinematic viscosity at 100C, and one with a higher HTHS, the higher HTHS oil will have higher oil pressure and likely maintain the pressure better throughout the entire interval.

http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums...=530501&page=1
http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums...Number=1988816

Also, the first number on the bottle doesn't even actually tell you how thick or thin an oil is at temps that most of us see. The first number is tested at -30C for a 5W-x and at -35C for a 0W-x.
http://www.pqiamerica.com/coldcrank.htm
I'm running Motul 300V 0W-40 which is thicker than 300V 5W-30 down to about -15F. Many people would assume the 0W-40 is thinner in freezing temps or at cold start.

When an xW-30 shears out of grade it shears to a 20 grade. Generally speaking a 10W-30 will shear less than a 5W-30 because it has less viscosity modifiers, but there have been 10W-30's that have sheared to a 20 grade.

-Dennis
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Old 01-02-2013, 11:09 PM   #91
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FWIW, your particular MY allows 10W-40 down to -4F so I can't see it being too thick, especially in the summer in the Southeast. The only 0W-30 that I would use in any Subaru turbo (even stock) is one that meets European ACEA A3 specs for shear stability (like German Castrol).

IMO, people tend to think too much about the numbers on the bottle but they should also think about High Temp High Shear (HTHS) which will give you a better idea of how an oil will behave in an engine and it also has an effect on oil pressure. If you take two oils with the same kinematic viscosity at 100C, and one with a higher HTHS, the higher HTHS oil will have higher oil pressure and likely maintain the pressure better throughout the entire interval.

http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums...=530501&page=1
http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums...Number=1988816

Also, the first number on the bottle doesn't even actually tell you how thick or thin an oil is at temps that most of us see. The first number is tested at -30C for a 5W-x and at -35C for a 0W-x.
http://www.pqiamerica.com/coldcrank.htm
I'm running Motul 300V 0W-40 which is thicker than 300V 5W-30 down to about -15F. Many people would assume the 0W-40 is thinner in freezing temps or at cold start.

When an xW-30 shears out of grade it shears to a 20 grade. Generally speaking a 10W-30 will shear less than a 5W-30 because it has less viscosity modifiers, but there have been 10W-30's that have sheared to a 20 grade.

-Dennis
Thanks Dennis. How do you feel about Shell Rotella T6 synthetic? That's what I've been using since my first rod bearing failure as there's quite a few NASIOC and BITOG threads about how great it is in our cars. Anti sheering, anti foaming, good cold cranking flow but retains high viscosity at high temp etc. All that didn't save my 2nd engine but I'm pretty sure that one failed because the shop that built the engine re-used my oil cooler and oil pan from my original engine lol.

I still wonder. For a stock 07 STI engine which is what I'm swapping in would you recommend something else?
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Old 01-03-2013, 12:00 AM   #92
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Default MAF Sensors

Old MAFs vs Dirty MAFs:

yes they are different. Cleaning is usually the first thing I do to a MAF when I notice it isn't giving me the proper voltage. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. The ratio is about 50/50.

Have I spent time trying to figure out why they are failing? Nope. Not enough time in my day to waste doing that. Corrosion is probably the culprit, but the element is pretty far up in there and hard to see. Plus my eyes aren't too good at focusing on things that little that close to my face.

You mention your fuel trims are at 3%. I have to ask, have you been making minute changes to your tune over time? If so, you could have been compensating for the erosion of the sensor. Or it's possible your frequent cleaning has minimized any corrosion. I can tell you that most of the customers that have failing MAFs have never cleaned theirs. Most of them are second, third and fourth owners of the car. Also they usually believed the salesman at the dealership who said "an old man/lady owned this"... the same line they tell everyone. (I think it's part of their training)
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Old 01-03-2013, 12:13 AM   #93
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MP thanks for the info ....can i ask you if you believe line boring the block and using oem bearings will work to get the bearing clearance back to spec ? of course i'm going to get a new oem crank and rods also.having trouble finding a wrx spec crank.i see some for 1.8,2.0,2.2 motors ...are they the same for the wrx 2.0 turbo motor? and are the rods the same too? Gads these little beasties are touchy...guess a new MAF is in order too.funny thing is the car is not getting mpg it was getting when it was newer.i guess the high milage could effect that.really did'nt get a whole tank through it after the rebuild ...only 450 miles
line boring the block only makes the mains bigger. Unless of course you find a shop that can do it right and have them mill the cases first, then re-hone the mains. That's how we do it, but it's really expensive, really time consuming and can be screwed up. The time lost, the cost and the risk are why we do NOT rebuild Subaru shortblocks; we start from scratch every time.

WRX cranks are super easy to get. I have no clue why you would have a hard time. I haven't received any emails from you so I know you haven't tried very hard. The part numbers are readily available and easy to look up. With that you call a dealership and get a crank in about 3 days. They run about 330-ish dollars or so.

Rods are easy too. If you want a cheap upgrade, get factory STi rods. They are the same length but much stronger.

Subarus aren't really that bad. The problem is that people don't realize how balanced they come from the factory. There isn't a lot left on the table with the fuel or turbocharger systems. You have to upgrade everything at the same time. Also, misconceptions in oil quality and weights is a killer. Read the owners manual, it tells you what weights of oil you can run and it does say that you should use thicker oil for "heavy duty use and towing". If you're turning up the power, that's heavy duty. Misleading information all over the internet doesn't help any either. Certain "big" shops give advice solely based on the margin it brings them. World One was a perfect example of this. Every car I've seen come out of there was loaded full of garbage parts that had very high margins. The owners were usually clueless about the cars and got whatever they were told. They are no longer in business, but the cars are still out there. I'm dealing with two of them at the moment. Currently, the quality parts have very small margins because they COST MORE for a reason. People who carry the parts lower the price to just above their cost to try and get the parts to compete with the lower quality ebay products and some of the very poorly made china products (not all china products are poor, there are a few that I am very fond of).

It's no wonder people would think these cars are difficult when they have tons of businesses just trying to attack their wallets and not looking out for them.
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Old 01-03-2013, 03:15 AM   #94
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M power thanks again for your tip and knowlege.
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Old 01-03-2013, 08:03 AM   #95
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Thanks Dennis. How do you feel about Shell Rotella T6 synthetic? That's what I've been using since my first rod bearing failure as there's quite a few NASIOC and BITOG threads about how great it is in our cars. Anti sheering, anti foaming, good cold cranking flow but retains high viscosity at high temp etc. All that didn't save my 2nd engine but I'm pretty sure that one failed because the shop that built the engine re-used my oil cooler and oil pan from my original engine lol.

I still wonder. For a stock 07 STI engine which is what I'm swapping in would you recommend something else?
Rotella T6 is a good oil and is great bang for the buck. It has shown to shear in some conditions, but that's not necessarily a bad thing (unless it leads to wear). I have short trips so I prefer a lighter 40 weight like a 0W-40. Something like Mobil1 0W-40 has similar levels of anti-wear additives to RT6, and has more friction modifiers, which should be better for fuel economy. It's also a little thinner when freezing. Yeah, I doubt that was an oil failure you had.

-Dennis
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Old 01-03-2013, 10:18 AM   #96
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Old MAFs vs Dirty MAFs:

yes they are different. Cleaning is usually the first thing I do to a MAF when I notice it isn't giving me the proper voltage. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. The ratio is about 50/50.

Have I spent time trying to figure out why they are failing? Nope. Not enough time in my day to waste doing that. Corrosion is probably the culprit, but the element is pretty far up in there and hard to see. Plus my eyes aren't too good at focusing on things that little that close to my face.

You mention your fuel trims are at 3%. I have to ask, have you been making minute changes to your tune over time? If so, you could have been compensating for the erosion of the sensor. Or it's possible your frequent cleaning has minimized any corrosion. I can tell you that most of the customers that have failing MAFs have never cleaned theirs. Most of them are second, third and fourth owners of the car. Also they usually believed the salesman at the dealership who said "an old man/lady owned this"... the same line they tell everyone. (I think it's part of their training)
Thanks for the follow up. I don't know if anyone without a lens probe can see those wires clearly so it's not just you, those things are tiny lol. I did spend some time dialing in the fuel trims but that's because I was having a cold idle issue due to TGV deletes and aftermarket injectors. I would make changes to the injector latency and tip in and then would have to re-scale the maf. Once I got the injectors where I wanted them (i'm on DW 850's which are the first size up from having stock latency figures..in theory) I spent about 20 min on the drive to or from work to touch up the MAF scaling, longer if I had a longer trip to take. Once all that ended my afr learning figures would vary a little bit and then more or less lock in within + or - 3 or 4 %.

When I had my failure I hadn't touched the tune in about 2 months and was having really stable logs daily. I got addicted to logging considering how bad everything was with the tune I paid for, plus I have this awesome little Netbook with a 12 hour battery that makes it super super easy.

I think the MAF is fine due to regular cleaning. Perhaps that's why there's MAF sensor cleaner that gets sold in big spray bottles at every auto parts store, regular cleaning is a requirement of owning a MAF car and if you don't you can ruin your MAF. Thanks to it being made out of PLATINUM they cost a whole lot of money. You can tell folks too that if you're able to buy a cheap MAF sensor brand new, its hot wire is probably not made of platinum so it will corrode and fail much faster. There's a reason a little plastic thing with 2 wires and a plug costs $200 bucks.

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Originally Posted by bluesubie View Post
Rotella T6 is a good oil and is great bang for the buck. It has shown to shear in some conditions, but that's not necessarily a bad thing (unless it leads to wear). I have short trips so I prefer a lighter 40 weight like a 0W-40. Something like Mobil1 0W-40 has similar levels of anti-wear additives to RT6, and has more friction modifiers, which should be better for fuel economy. It's also a little thinner when freezing. Yeah, I doubt that was an oil failure you had.

-Dennis
Cool deal. Sounds like you also don't buy into the Mobil1 hate. Then again, the 0W-40 is a different oil than the off the shelf Mobil1 5W30 sold here in the US from what I understand. My old college roommate used to order Mobile1 0W40 and Castrol Syntec 0w40 from Germany for his swapped Miata.

I think I'll stick with T6 and switch to a good 10W-40 for the summer. I actually religiously use a engine block heater and was sitting in my car the full 8 min to get it fully warm most of the time before driving. I was paranoid about the piston slap from the forged pistons so I don't mind going thicker and waiting things out.
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Old 01-03-2013, 12:42 PM   #97
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Maxwell Power has my business based on his contributions to this thread alone
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Old 01-03-2013, 01:06 PM   #98
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Cool deal. Sounds like you also don't buy into the Mobil1 hate. Then again, the 0W-40 is a different oil than the off the shelf Mobil1 5W30 sold here in the US from what I understand. My old college roommate used to order Mobile1 0W40 and Castrol Syntec 0w40 from Germany for his swapped Miata.

I think I'll stick with T6 and switch to a good 10W-40 for the summer. I actually religiously use a engine block heater and was sitting in my car the full 8 min to get it fully warm most of the time before driving. I was paranoid about the piston slap from the forged pistons so I don't mind going thicker and waiting things out.
No, I don't buy into the Mobil1 hate at all. I just wouldn't run any Resource Conserving 5W-30 from any brand in a turbo, but their 0W-40 meets the toughest oil specs in the industry (Porsche A40 and Mercedes 229.3). The SN version also seems to be holding up even better than the SM version.

Mobil1 TDT 5W-40 is thicker in all temps than Rotella and Mobil1 10W-30 High Mileage meets European ACEA A3 specs. Shell makes great oil though. Castrol Edge 0W-40 is starting to pop up in a few Advance Auto Parts.

-Dennis
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Old 01-03-2013, 09:26 PM   #99
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Maxwell Power has my business based on his contributions to this thread alone
+1 Maxwell Power is local to me and its the best engine/tuning shop in NW.
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Old 01-03-2013, 09:46 PM   #100
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is it true that a 2005 2.0 wrx crank will oil better than the 2003 ? and i assume it fits? trying to get a game plan going .
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