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Old 12-20-2014, 05:27 PM   #1
whitesoorex
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Default AN fitting installation

Before I lose my freaking mind, does anyone have any techniques to install AN fittings? I'm on like attempt number 12 on a new AN4 turbo feed line, and if I have to trim it down much more it's going to be too short.

I don't really get how this is supposed to be done, there is just no way it can fit, the braided wires just get bent up. Impossible and seriously frustrating.

How do you guys do it? Some sort of tool? The cheapest tool I can find is like 50 bucks and I cant even see how it would help.
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Old 12-22-2014, 12:21 AM   #2
rategood
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Did you tape up the braided hose before cutting it. If you do this it helps prevent it from fraying. Hopefully this helps?
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Old 12-22-2014, 01:48 AM   #3
Zefy
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Sounds like you are using rubber hose for an oil feed line. This is a less than good idea. You should be using teflon line with a proper matching fitting.

I would recommend getting one made by newline or greenline hoses. JIC fittings are the same as AN, but are made of steel and a hose from them will be rated for high heat and mutiple thousands of pounds of pressure. Just don't tell them it is for a car. Say it's for your log splitter or something... I think the last one I bought was 20-30 bucks and the fittings were preinstalled. Simple and fast.

Take a couple pics of what you're working with. There are many different types of hoses and there is a change you are using the incorrect fitting for the hose you have.
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Old 12-22-2014, 10:39 AM   #4
DIGGYGV8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zefy View Post
Just don't tell them it is for a car. Say it's for your log splitter or something...
bahahahahahhahahahahhah

stories for another day...


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Old 12-22-2014, 07:00 PM   #5
clsmooth
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I found a pre-fab'd one on eBay with swivel fittings to boot, $20-$30 as well...
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Old 12-23-2014, 04:07 PM   #6
whitesoorex
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actually i think i figured this out... the hose i used was some stuff I had which used russell brand fittings, but the 90 degree fittings i need are some universal brand. the two dont mix...... i ordered some new hose.

zefy, i dont know what your saying. braided hose does have a rubber core yes... but its good to 450f and 1500psi. good for fuels, motor oil & coolant. everybody uses this stuff.
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Old 12-23-2014, 05:37 PM   #7
Zefy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by whitesoorex View Post
actually i think i figured this out... the hose i used was some stuff I had which used russell brand fittings, but the 90 degree fittings i need are some universal brand. the two dont mix...... i ordered some new hose.

zefy, i dont know what your saying. braided hose does have a rubber core yes... but its good to 450f and 1500psi. good for fuels, motor oil & coolant. everybody uses this stuff.

The reason I recommend having one made for you is it will save you time and are more robust than rubber hose. Rubber core SS line does not last a super long time. I've had a couple failures from these personally and seen even more. It will probably be fine, but for basically the same money, you can have a PTFE core hose rated for hydraulic use. I would also bet that if you went and had a look at all the big name turbo manufacturers, you would see that the feed lines they sell will all be PTFE hoses. This isn't for bling factor or because racecar...

Finally, pressure and temperature ratings of hose does NOT mean the hose is rated for 1500psi at 450f. What this actually means is at 450f it is at it's max thermal capacity and has zero pressure holding ability. Unless actually specified XXXXpsi @ XXXf (which is considered "working pressure") the above is the typical method of displaying pressure and temperature ratings. Here is a handy chart that you'll typically see for a hose. Keep in mind that these charts are specific to different hoses and unfortunately, because russell doesn't actually give this info (most don't in fact) it is really hard to determine what is safe and what isn't.



So as you can see in the above example, even though that hose is rated for 2000psi and 320f, if you were to run it at 290f, you have only 1000psi of pressure holding capacity.

You're right in saying that I was quick to judge about the hose capability, as it will probably be totally fine. Half of the battle of using AN fittings is getting them together. Keeping them from weeping and breaking is the rest. Maybe I'm just lazy but having a pressure tested and preassembled hose (no wire poked fingers!) makes me feel way better when it is has the ability to spray high pressure oil all over a 1000f piece of iron.

As someone that has done this a time or two and specs hoses for a variety of things as part of my job, I would like to think I know what I'm doing. I also have no problems assembling fittings.
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Old 12-24-2014, 04:26 AM   #8
cndracer25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zefy View Post
Sounds like you are using rubber hose for an oil feed line. This is a less than good idea. You should be using teflon line with a proper matching fitting.

I would recommend getting one made by newline or greenline hoses. JIC fittings are the same as AN, but are made of steel and a hose from them will be rated for high heat and mutiple thousands of pounds of pressure. Just don't tell them it is for a car. Say it's for your log splitter or something... I think the last one I bought was 20-30 bucks and the fittings were preinstalled. Simple and fast.

Take a couple pics of what you're working with. There are many different types of hoses and there is a change you are using the incorrect fitting for the hose you have.

http://www.new-line.com/hose/metal/h...ivels-each-end

I think he is talking about this stuff. Idk what - size you need but the #4 is rated at 3000 psi.
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Old 12-24-2014, 04:32 AM   #9
cndracer25
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the only real difference between this stuff and ptfe is this is rated for more psi and has a larger bend radius. the teflon will kink if you try to bend to sharp where as the ptfe will not.
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Old 12-24-2014, 04:38 AM   #10
Zefy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cndracer25 View Post
the only real difference between this stuff and ptfe is this is rated for more psi and has a larger bend radius. the teflon will kink if you try to bend to sharp where as the ptfe will not.
PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) is the chemical name for teflon which is the trademarked brand name made by dupont.

What you're talking about is convolute tubing (available in almost every material) which has a better bend radius than its smooth bore counterpart. PTFE is indeed not as flexible as rubber hose, but if the hose is properly designed and installed this should never be a problem.
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Old 12-24-2014, 02:03 PM   #11
whitesoorex
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Good info here, that chart is great.

I could have gotten one made up which I have done in the past but honestly I just wanted to learn how to assemble them myself. i hate relying on other people for things, would rather learn how to do as much as possible on my own.
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Old 12-24-2014, 02:04 PM   #12
whitesoorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cndracer25 View Post
the only real difference between this stuff and ptfe is this is rated for more psi and has a larger bend radius. the teflon will kink if you try to bend to sharp where as the ptfe will not.
teflon IS ptfe...
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