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Old 06-18-2013, 12:48 PM   #1
wrxeter
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2013 WRX SE
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Default Quenching diode needed?

So I am planning on running a new lead from the battery to a new fuse block on my car. One side of the panel will be accessory trigger, some will be ignition trigger, some will be constant. Each circuit I will be rating at 30 amps max so the acc/ign circuits will need to be switched by a relay.

My initial thoughts were to use a turbo timer harness with the accessory/ign leads powering the relay (Bosch SPST) coils. Will these relays need a quenching diode between terminals 85 & 86?
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Old 06-18-2013, 09:05 PM   #2
Cougar4
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I don't think you will need the diodes. If you are planning to actually use 30 amps of current through the relay I suggest you use relays that are rated for at least 40 amps of current.
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Old 06-18-2013, 11:41 PM   #3
wrxeter
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Yup. I am running 2 fused wires from the battery to two relays.

Inline fuse is rated at 40 amps (swapped for a 30 amp), relay is rated at 40, using 12ga wire over 8'. Fuse block is rated 25 amps for each circuit: 8 circuits - 3 fed from ACC relay, 3 fed from Ign relay, 2 constant. The single biggest circuit I will have is 15 amps. The ACC and IGN will obviously have their own relay.

60 amps total, but I know I will ever use that much. Both relays will probably only see 20 amps max (if that), but i want to have room to grow if i need to.
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Old 06-19-2013, 07:10 AM   #4
klarowe
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I would use a fuse smaller than the relay rating. That way if you happen to draw more current, you will pop the fuse before damaging the relay. Fuses are cheaper and easier to replace.
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