Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Sunday April 20, 2014
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences Home Registration is free! Visit the NASIOC Store NASIOC Rules Search Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Calendar Archive NASIOC Upgrade Garage Logout
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC General > News & Rumors > Non-Subaru News & Rumors

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-21-2013, 01:20 PM   #1
AVANTI R5
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 73805
Join Date: Nov 2004
Default Some Cars Are Better With A Roof This Is One

Quote:
Slideshow: 2014 Nissan 370Z

It takes roughly 21 seconds to raise the 2014 Nissan 370Z Roadsterís top from its lair under the back tonneau to its rightful place behind the windshield. This seems like an entirely reasonable amount of time until you find yourself pulled off into a side parking lot, mashing the top mechanism control button in impatient fury as the entire volume of the Pacific Ocean dumps into the cabin courtesy of a surprise thunderstorm. Itís also just long enough to coax you to the same realization thatís splayed across the face of every bemused onlooker: Youíre the jackass who should have bought the coupe.

The Nissan Z family doesnít have a very successful history in convertible guise, and like its forbearers before it, the 370 is at its best when its long, dramatic roof and hatchback derriere are in place. But that doesnít mean the 370Z Roadster is a completely neutered version of its hardtop twin. Far from it.

Thereís no avoiding the fact that with the canvas top up, the car looks a bit ungainly. Like the 350Z Roadster, the 370Z Roadsterís roof ends in an abrupt bustle, shearing the machine of the hardtopís menacing profile. The top goes down in a bit of clunky ballet as the fiberglass tonneau opens its maw, revealing the deep storage well. With the folding roof stowed, the Roadster shows itself to be plenty attractive. Big, bold rear hips define the shape, and the long axle-to-dash ratio helps give the machine the classic proportions of some of my favorite European roadsters.

Amazingly, putting the top down doesnít do the 370Z any visibility favors inside. The rear bulkhead sits at approximately ear level, which means the driver gets stuck with a mirror full of seats, roll hoops, and little else. Itís like the Roadsterís wearing substantial shoulder pads. The view ahead remains as good as itís ever been. The big, tachometer-centric gauges are easy to read and appropriately sporty, if a bit down-market, and the mesh-and-leather seats in this tester look as good as they feel.



Zach Bowman Yes, thatís a big automatic shift lever sticking from the transmission tunnel. Nissan graced this particular Roadster with the companyís seven-speed automatic transmission. The gearbox isnít the millstone I expected it to be, thanks in part to spot-on shift logic and very quick gear changes. Think dual-clutch speed. Is it as good as the six-speed manual and its rev-match trickery? Of course not, but it wonít get in your way should you decide to wring the carís neck, and itís substantially more refined than the dual-clutch gearbox in the companyís GT-R.

Bump around town, and the Roadsterís too-stiff suspension will do its best to remove your molars by force. Every encounter with broken pavement or an expansion joint is an exercise in potential spinal injury, complete with a healthy helping of cowl shake. But point the nose toward and uninterrupted stretch of undulating asphalt and the car starts to come alive. That venerable 3.7-liter VQ V6 under the hood abandons the uninspired drone of low rpm once the tach swings past 4500 rpm, opening up into a brawny chorus. With the top down, the soundís magical.

There are 332 horsepower and 270 pound-feet of torque on hand, and the grunt on tap is good enough to hustle the 3510 pounds of convertible around without too much effort. Thatís nearly 200 pounds more than the hard top, and as such, it takes a bit longer for the Roadster to get up to speed. Expect sprints to 60 mph in around 4.7 seconds.


Zach Bowman Despite the extra heft, the Roadster feels good and light on its feet. Turn in is quick, and those stiff springs and aggressive dampers come into their own with a little fast action on the steering wheel. The handling is surprisingly neutral, and the optional big brake kit does a great job of keeping the party from getting too out of control. Thereís a pair of 14-inch rotors up front pressed by four piston calipers, and two-piston calipers squeeze 13.8-inch discs out back.

For those buyers looking for a quick weekend tourer capable of carving up and down a good mountain pass, the 370Z Roadster scratches most of the right itches. That is, except what is possibly the most important one of them all: price.

While the 2014 Nissan 370Z Roadster starts at an already steep $41,470, this tester, in kitted-up touring trim and with the optional Sport package, will set you back $51,365. Like the hardtop iteration, the 370Z Roadster is easily outclassed by younger blood worth similar coin or less. Buyers can fetch a Mustang GT Convertible Premium for around $40,000, and while that carís chassis may not be as taught as the Z, the heady 420-hp 5.0-liter V8 engine makes up for a stack of woes. It also returns fuel economy identical to the 370Z Roadsterís 18 mpg city and 25 mpg highway when both are equipped with their respective automatic gearboxes.

Technically, you can also buy a stripper Porsche Boxster for the gussied up Roadsterís asking price, and I likely donít need to tell you how glad Iíd be to give up fanciness like leather heated and cooled seats, satellite radio and the like for the kind of driving bliss the Boxster delivers. Turn your eye toward the BMW stable, and options like the Z4 or 135is make strong arguments against the Z.

The 370Z finds itself in a sea of damn impressive competition, and hacking the roof off adds more compromise and expense to a vehicle that doesnít need any help convincing buyers to look elsewhere for their jollies.
99887
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
AVANTI R5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2013, 02:49 PM   #2
Snowphun
NASIOC Supporter
 
Member#: 1800
Join Date: Jul 2000
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Way South Shore MA
Vehicle:
WRX /Cooper S/Miata
awd/fwd/rwd

Default

Yep, too pricey, cheap interior bits, ugly as a convertible. I think the 350z is even uglier but that isn't much of a compliment.
Snowphun is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2013, 03:32 PM   #3
justincredible
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 83633
Join Date: Mar 2005
Chapter/Region: RMIC
Location: Zion
Vehicle:
2012 bright green
box

Default

It's not a big car and it only has two seats, how does it weigh 3500lbs?
justincredible is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2013, 07:16 PM   #4
bal00
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 54772
Join Date: Feb 2004
Default

Odd. I rented one a while ago (Roadster, 7AT) and I think I'd prefer the hardtop. Visibility really is terrible, the roadster is softer than the coupe, the engine note (especially at high revs) is nothing to write home about and there's way too much tire and wind noise at higher speeds.

Not that it's a bad car, but less noise, better rear visibility, some extra cargo space and a stiffer chassis/suspension is definitely something that car could use. The ventilated seats in the roadster are nice though.
bal00 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2013, 11:46 PM   #5
Hondaslayer
Purified Dick
Moderator
 
Member#: 4562
Join Date: Feb 2001
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Auburn, WA
Vehicle:
1995 Legacy LSi
1998 Forester, lifted.

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bal00 View Post
Odd. I rented one a while ago (Roadster, 7AT) and I think I'd prefer the hardtop. Visibility really is terrible, the roadster is softer than the coupe, the engine note (especially at high revs) is nothing to write home about and there's way too much tire and wind noise at higher speeds.

Not that it's a bad car, but less noise, better rear visibility, some extra cargo space and a stiffer chassis/suspension is definitely something that car could use. The ventilated seats in the roadster are nice though.
Visibility in the hard top is just a bad. I want to like the cars, I just can't. Too big, too slow, horrible greenhouse.
Hondaslayer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2013, 08:38 AM   #6
merauder69
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 15993
Join Date: Mar 2002
Chapter/Region: E. Canada
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Vehicle:
2012 TT RS
Pearl Grey

Default

The engine is fairly boring and long in the tooth. It is too heavy for a two seat RWD vehicle. Styling is a topic of debate. I drove both the coupe and convertible, meh. The top on the convertible does take what feels like forever to open/close.
Unfortunately the Z is in need of a whole redesign with a new power-plant and a platform not borrowed from a sedan, but that doesn't seem to be happening any time soon.
merauder69 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:06 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2014 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2014, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.