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Old 01-06-2014, 07:50 AM   #1
stuiephoto
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Default '95 RSTI- One Lap of America 2014 starts NOW! May 3-10

Hello! I have been running this thread on a few other forums, so sorry for the giant wall of images!

This car is being built to run the 2014 One lap of America in May.

One Lap of America





Back story.

I started out doing lapping days in my 2006 STI a few years back. After my second event, I cracked the oil pickup and blew the motor and turbo. After rebuilding that car, I sold it and built a track dedicated miata. After running that for a year and a half, this car fell into my lap so the miata got sold in a hurry and I started this build.

This car is being built by myself with some help from a friend. The goal is to have a reliable track car that can be driven on the street to local carshows and whatnot. BUDGET is #1. Anyone can throw $$ at a car and make it go fast. I want to spend money on stuff that will make me go fast, while "skimping" where possible. I custom made a bunch of stuff to save cash over buying off the shelf "pretty" parts. Form over function.

A friend had acquired this '95 coupe. He had also acquired a complete 2005 STI drivetrain that he planned to keep as spare parts. One night while we were hanging out-- for some reason we threw the 95 on the lift and started stripping the drivetrain. One thing led to another, and I purchased the project. This build slowly started in the beginning of the year 2013. It slowly ramped up in the spring, and I now work on the car 40 hours a week in preparation to run OLOA in 2014. I am planning on getting the car tuned at Innovative Tuning in Buffalo, NY by the end of january.

I DO NOT claim to be a track expert. I take criticism well, and would love feedback from people who do have extensive track experience with subaru's. I have assisted my friend with his sti time attack car over the past couple years so we are not rookies, but there are always tricks that can be learned from other peoples experiences!


The chassis is a 1995 coupe, FWD, Auto. I don't have any "before" pics of the car, because I had not anticipated what the project has turned into.




Motorcycle project?


Interior was stripped.


Engine bay was cleaned up. The car had been sitting for a LONG time and was very dirty.



Many hours were spent stripping the tar from the floors. This crap weighs a ton! I dont remember the weight, but I think it was over 20lbs.



- - - Updated - - -

I fitted the dash beam, dash, heater core, etc. I did not concern myself with dash gaps. This is going to be a track car. If I get bored down the line, I may go back to that and make it look nicer.

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Last edited by stuiephoto; 05-01-2014 at 03:57 AM.
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:50 AM   #2
stuiephoto
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New holes for heater core.


Took out the battery tray hump thing. It was rusty anyways. It got cleaned up better after this pic (before paint).


Wanted the car to look a little nicer. I painted the engine bay and interior grey after masking all of the glass. The car rolled around for a while on furniture dollys. I definitely got stoned a few times doing this-- I had paint in my nostrils for weeks, and I definitely lost a TON of brain cells.


Wanted the car to look a little nicer. I painted the engine bay and interior grey after masking all of the glass. The car rolled around for a while on furniture dollys. I definitely got stoned a few times doing this-- I had paint in my nostrils for weeks, and I definitely lost a TON of brain cells.





Once the paint was dry, the process of bolting in the STI parts began. We decided that everything STI that could fit in the car would be put in.
STI brake booster, clutch master, pedals.





I then started to prepare the wiring harness. This is a full harness from an '05 sti. I stripped a lot of un-needed crap from it, including 4lbs of airbag wiring and 1+lb of tape and looming. Spent many many hours with a razor blade contemplating letting it "slip".





Once the paint was dry, the process of bolting in the STI parts began. We decided that everything STI that could fit in the car would be put in.
STI brake booster, clutch master, pedals.
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:52 AM   #3
stuiephoto
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1lb 6oz of tape/loom

Some of the airbag wiring.


The dash and heater core were removed and the harness was layed into the car.


Harness in the car (obviously a pic from a little further along).


The donor car had been in an accident so we had to replace a control arm and a balljoint. The front subframe was bolted in with little effort and slowly the rest of the front suspension fell into place. For now, the car will be running on stock 05 sti struts with eibach springs. Not a ton to write about this, easy as pie.





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Old 01-06-2014, 07:52 AM   #4
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Now onto the rear! The whole rear was stripped to nothing.

DOH Broken nut. Had to drill from the top to get these off. Typical subaru.



The 95 gas tank was replaced with the sti gas tank, as for obvious reasons the 95 doesn't have a hump for the driveshaft. The sti gas tank dropped in like it was supposed to be there. The rear subframe was bolted in as a whole unit.




Since the car is now a roller, Next the tranny was lifted in.




Now for the brakes. One of the big issues with impreza's is how much weight is over the nose of the car. I decided that I would move the abs pump to the passenger floor to move some weight back. I made a bracket for the pump using the oem studs from the ECU cover. I re-plumbed the front of the car and just cut and re-bent the rear lines to fit.



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Old 01-06-2014, 07:53 AM   #5
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Since mike was running an custom upgraded brake kit made by Innovative Tuning, we swapped the stock front calipers with his, which have stainless steel pistons and Ti shims. I installed the anti-knockback springs he had sitting on the shelf. We bled the system and no leaks!









The motor from the donor had been repurposed for a other project, so I picked up a low mileage long block out of an 08 wrx for a smoking deal. Leakdown was great! The turbo is a Garrett gt30 with an externally gated turboxs rotated setup. I bolted on the required parts and in it went.






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Old 01-06-2014, 07:53 AM   #6
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One of the issues with old FWD imprezas is that the holes in the chassis for the AWD bits have had plastic caps on them for almost 20 years. I had to chase the threads of all of the holes to get the surface rust out of them. The driveshaft had been sold before the donor car was purchased, so we had to source one. Unfortunately none of the proper driveshaft hardware came with the parts so I had to order it all new.






I started on the body. The doors from the 95 were very damaged. Conveniently I knew someone with a '99 RS chassis rotting away (part of my subaru collection). I put on the RS doors and swapped the power windows with the manual hardware from the '95. This decision was initially made to save weight. Once it was found that the power windows were marginally heavier than manual, it became a decision of a lot less wiring to deal with. Also, GC power windows suck anyways. Weight is a concern, so the bumper beams won't be used for this car. Aluminum brackets were used to Mount the rear bumper at a total weight of 3lbs. I forgot to take pictures of the brackets, but they aren't anything special

I decided to wire in the power mirrors. Havent hooked up a battery yet so they still need to be tested. Need to make those stray wires look better.




With the rear bumper finally mounted, its time for FLARES! I ordered ZG flares from thezstore. The rears were marked, drilled, rivnut'ed, and bolted on in a few hours. I have yet to cut out the metal-- I'm a baby. All of the hardware used is aluminum.
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:54 AM   #7
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Since mike ran e85 on his car, why not run it on both? This means a top feed conversion. Luckly mike had top feed TGV's laying around so I gutted them (forgot to get pics). I pulled the old stuff off, and decided to strip the engine harness of the un-needed plugs.









She gets an interior. I need to find 98+ manual crank door cards, as the 95 ones dont fit with the sti dash. I am not sure of those even exist in coupe form.





Fabbed up a foot guard for the brake lines. I have about 2 hours torch time on a tig so its not beautiful-- but its functional!



Carbon fiber hood! Rice!
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:54 AM   #8
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I didnt want to use off the shelf intercooler piping. The routing of the pipes between the radiator and the motor is garbage. Since the battery is going to be mounted in the trunk and the ABS pump is moved, I can cut holes to route the pipes in a better manner.





Bead maker version 2. Mike made one a while back, and I found this design online which was a little different than his. Works well for the 5 bucks it cost to make.




Drivers side intercooler piping "done". I think I might change it, or cut it and add a coupler. I think its going to be too solid and something will break when I beat on the car.

There seems to be a gap....






DOH! No exhaust hangar on that side. Will have to fab something up. Had this HUGE fartcan laying around from some other car. We will have to see how loud it is.
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:54 AM   #9
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Subb'd
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:55 AM   #10
stuiephoto
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Almost forgot my custom fabricated firewall hole covers. They dont make grommets that fit holes cut with a saw.







And we cant forget the RSTI badge I machined last year. Who would have thought I would have a use for it? Not me...



So, I was told that this thread makes it look like swapping a car is easy. On one end, bolting in the main drivetrain IS easy. All of the bolts line up, no surprises. The tricky part is everything else. I have an entire sheet of paper full of random crap that I have to do, and that's just stuff I have found. It seems like one step forward, one step back at this point.

Obviously, swapping in a turbo drivetrain means that you have to run an ECU capable of handling a turbo motor (none of that silly piggyback ECU garbage that some people use). To do this, you have one of 2 options. Option one is to keep the GC body harness and merge the STI harness into it. Many people go this route and pay a service like iWire to do it. With the STI/DCCD/etc, this is an expensive option (last I looked, it was over 700 dollars for a STI merge). I tried merging on my own once-- didnt end well and I abandoned the project. Option 2 is to put the entire STI harness in the car, and wire whatever is necessary on the body. With this, you use ALL STI components such as the dash, HVAC, etc. The downside is that you have to wire every last bit-- headlights, tail lights, windows, wipers, yada yada. I found this to be not that big of a deal, and I already have half of it done.


Heres some other issues that I have run into. Many of these "small" issues require a lot of work hunting down parts or just fiddling with them to make it work right.

Dash beam. In order to use the STI dash, you need to run the STI dash beam. This sounds easy, but it takes hours to make it fit correctly. The holes between the GC and GD chassis are not the same, so you basically need to make templates to create your own holes. There is a LOT of putting the beam in, taking it out, putting it in, taking it out. I think I spent an entire day and a half just getting this to fit correctly. Alongside this issue, the HVAC requires different holes to be cut in the firewall as documented other places in this thread. The dash beam forward was probably a solid 50 hours of work getting it all lined up. The blower motor does NOT like to fit in the GC chassis and requires some modifying and custom mounts to make it fit. I almost said F*** it and went without heat due to that damn thing.


If anyone decides to do a swap on their own, do NOT piece parts together. Buy an entire chassis and take the parts off yourself. The original owner of the donor parts stripped the chassis and there was a bunch of random stuff missing, as well as a lot of the specialty bolts missing.

I was missing the bushings here.


Had to buy new sway bar...things?


New tierod, balljoint and control arm due to the accident. Need new front endlinks as they are broken/missing.



The steering components are slightly different between all of the years. This becomes an issue for 2 reasons. The length of the universal shaft that connects the steering wheel to the rack is different, and the outer diameter of the actual steering column is different. For the first issue, every car I have seen built has their universal shaft cut and re-welded a shorter length. I didnt like this, and found out after a TON of research that due to the design, the entire shaft will actually collapse/shorted if persuaded. I assume this is a safety feature to keep the steering column from becoming part of your chest in the event of an accident. The second issue was resolved with a bushing from mcmaster.

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Old 01-06-2014, 07:55 AM   #11
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I need to source these 2 parts. If anyone has any leads, id appreciate it. The power steering pump bracket is broken where the alternator bolts through. The wire is the knock sensor, so I need a new plug for that unless anyone has a better idea.



I have spent the time and replaced all of the rubber fuel lines in the car. It will almost definitely see e85 within the next year so I wanted to be sure there were no leaks. Also shows some of the re-plumbing of the brake lines (all new copper tubing).


Sti seatbelts do not fit in the GC chassis. I had to track down buckles for the sti seats, as the receiver is different from year to year.



Heres what the wiring looks like right now. I have no idea where I am going to mount some of these modules-- its a clusterf*** up there.



There is no place for the ABS wires to connect to the inner fender. Ill probably have to zip screw them in, as there doesnt seem to be any other option.



Walbro 255 for now (stolen from mike). We will see how that does and go from there. Not sure if it will flow enough for corn. Also running a custom in-tank box to try and prevent fuel starvation. We will see how that goes.



And heres how she sits.

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Old 01-06-2014, 07:56 AM   #12
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Slow day.

Did a small part of the hotside piping.





I decided im going to do the power steering pressure line in -AN and run it underneath the intake. The stock line is all sorts of in the way. I think this is my parts list-- we will see if it changes at all. [DELETED LIST AS IT WAS WRONG]


I picked up an accessport for cheap off of craigslist. I am going to run speed density.



I ground off the front passenger side bolt humps off of the intake. This gave me much more clearance for the elbow. I am running a turboxs rotated setup. This uses a stock style uppipe (this particular uppipe has an EWG) with a "riser" platform for the turbo. Its not my dream setup but it should work fine. I am running the 90 degree elbow (thanks Innovative!) to a short 2" armorall bottle (due to my lack of 2" tubing in stock) to a 2 to 2.5" adapter to the 2.5" tube. I would have liked to run 1 2" to 2.5" elbow but there is not a lot of hood clearance where the elbow is so the change has to happen a little further from the turbo. I dont anticipate having any issues with this setup as I am not planning to push the limits of this turbo. Unfortunately the bandsaw blade broke so I didnt get as much done on it as I would have liked.

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Old 01-06-2014, 07:57 AM   #13
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Got this box from summit. Parts to fabricate a custom power steering line to get it out of the way of the turbo/intake/intercooler. I plan to run it underneath the intake manifold where the stock inlet would have been.



I started fabricating the remaining intercooler piping. I was being cheap and trying to do it with parts I had (minus the 2" section) when mike forced me against my will to just buy another section of tubing with the right angle. That will take a small bend out of the system.



Wired in the IAT sensor that I bought from Innovative Tuning yesterday. Need to tidy up that harness a bit still. Spent a lot of time just looking over the car and buttoning up a lot of small things. Plugged the coolant drain on the back of the motor. Got the o2 sensor in the header. Updated the accessport to the latest firmware and married it to the car.


It Runs!!


Big milestone. Still a ton of work to do but that should light a fire under me.

Mocked up the front bumper. Need to make custom supports-- materials are ordered. Also need to research the best "quick release" for the bumper mounts at the fender.



So, I converted to manual windows for "weight savings". The issue is that pre-98ish doorcards dont fit with the sti dash. Unfortunately, I am not 100% sure there even is such a thing as a 98+ manual crank coupe doorcard.

She needs a wash!


So i decided to weigh the manual crank and the power setup. 1lb difference. Eh, 2lbs total-- I will just convert BACK to power. If anyone needs this done, im getting really good at it.






For me, a project isnt a project unless i break the windshield. Had a piece of metal on the closed hood and opened it without noticing it, BAM. Broken. faacckkk
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:57 AM   #14
stuiephoto
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Parts!


Got the hotside piping done. I am pleased with the vice-grip bead roller method. Works well for the price.



I got sidetracked and made this. I havent decided if it will be a switch pannel, gauge pod, or what.


I started cutting out the rear fenders. I have been putting this off because I am a baby and dont want to undertake such a major..irreversible....what have I done!

I really have no idea what I am doing here--seriously. Just going with the flow. I watched a video 4 months ago about how someone did this on a Z. Thats the extent of my flare install knowledge.



Cuts made every couple inches to allow bending.


Folded up to the exterior pannel.
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:58 AM   #15
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Knock sensor wired in and all tucked away.

Stopped at innovative and picked up my radiator. Shiny!


For some reason, the gates GC upper hose doesnt fit. I kept cutting and cutting and it just doesnt go on without kinking. Not sure what to do about that.


Harvey upgraded his oil cooler core so I picked up his old earls core. Made some brackets and installed it.





I got sidetracked and decided to make a radiator shroud. All of the heat exchangers will be ducted in the end so im not completely wasting my time, even though there's more important stuff to do.

Made a straight edge out of a piece of steel.


CNC'd some holes. Everyone should own a mill. I dont use it nearly as often as I should.


Forgot to take a pic of it installed. This is it almost done.


Finished cutting up the other fender. This one went a lot faster-- i was done within an hour. Still need to decide what im going to use to seal that all up. I may por15 the exposed metal inside and out, then seal it up with that adhesive I bought (i dont "actually" know how to weld so a little glue to back up my tacks wont hurt).

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Old 01-06-2014, 07:58 AM   #16
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I only worked in the car for a couple nights this week. I got the pump side -an line fitted. I ordered the wrong fitting for the rack side and had a bunch of issues with that which wasted hours of time over nonsense.




So, I showed up to work on the car and the shop smelled of gas. There was a small small puddle under the car last week that I attributed to spilling fuel due to the tank filling slowly. This week, there was at least a half gallon of fuel under the car. While trying to figure it out, we took off the gas cap and fuel started pouring out of the filler neck. Further diagnosis found that there was excess pressure in the gas tank, and taking off the fuel return line from the sending unit caused gas to spray all over until the tank vented completely. I was running the sti tank with the 95 filled neck, and had routed the top large vent line from the tank to the filler neck. This obviously wasn't allowing the tank to vent because the cap seals the pressure in.

I swapped out the 95 neck for the sti neck. This is not a direct fit, but drilling a few new holes makes it fit almost like stock. Because I will not be running the emissions related stuff, the tank will be VTA with a filter to keep junk out. The tank still fills slowly but someone else runs this routing and said when they first did it, the tank filled slow for the first fillup and was fine thereafter.



Also found the drain plug was leaking because some random interior bolt was used when the tank was emptied for selling it. Bolt was replaced with a new bolt and crush washer and is leak free.

I then went to town and modified the downpipe. I had to modify the turbo bracket to make the turbo clear the sti intake manifold. This caused the downpipe to change locations and be about and inch and a half too low. I cut a section out and rewelded it. I only have about 45 minutes tops torch time with stainless. We don't have a good setup to hold pipe like this so there are a lot of starts and stops due to the awkward nature of holding the downpipe. If I get more into fabrication/welding I'll have to make something for this kind of situation. There were a few sections that needed some filler because the "high quality" bandsaw blade I bought blew apart cutting stainless. Could only fix it so much with the belt sander. Weld was back gassed.




Like a glove!
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Old 01-06-2014, 07:59 AM   #17
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Didnt get a ton done this week, worked some overtime. Got a lot of small boring stuff done like playing with the door wiring, some interior stuff, working overtime to pay for parts, and best of all, ordering parts!

If anyone ever needs to order -AN--- surprisingly the best place to get it is advance auto. They carry russell, and their listed prices are the same as amazon, summit, jegs, etc. They allow you to use the $40off $100 or more coupons, (I used a 30% off coupon because it ended up being $48 off my order total due to the amount I spent). I ordered some AN lines to complete my oil cooler, and the total (for the AN lines alone) was 38 bucks cheaper than the next cheapest I could find. Shipping was free as well. :tup:


Front flares are on.

First, I painters taped up the fender as to not scratch the hell out of it (fiberglass is brutal on paint) and allow me to draw reference marks on it with marker. As you can see, one of the previous owners of the car used the baseball bat method to roll the fenders.


I then used the washers to find the center of each pocket in the flare to mark the spot to drill the holes.

Center drilled

Drilled


Partially installed.



Done. Still need to cut the metal out from underneath but the fronts will take 4 seconds with a cutoff wheel. No folding and welding needed.




I have been speaking with the good folks over at nord-lock. They were kind enough to give me some samples of their new x-series locking washers. They are the same theory as the old design, but these have a concave design that is supposed to add a "spring" action similar to split lock washers. The engineer did not believe that they would keep much spring action under the high heat of turbo parts, but they were willing to let me test it out. If these fail, I will just switch to stage-8 hardware.

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Old 01-06-2014, 07:59 AM   #18
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I am not using the stock door switches. There is a lot of unnecessary wiring and complexity to them for features (such as window locks) that I will not be using. Rather than having those big switches sitting there, I will make a cover for the holes in the door card. I made a single DIN switch panel to house window up/down switches, and whatever other switches I decide to use. Ill machine labels into it once its all wired in. Im pretty sure I do stuff like this just to find a reason to use the welder. Starting to get a LITTLE better with aluminum, not much though. I think I have a setup issue, as I have some horrific arc wander at lower amperage. Not sure what is causing it. I polished off my first 125 tank of argon, so I will get that filled this week and pick up a gas lens and a new cup from airgas.





The train that was carrying some of my parts got de-railed so I didnt get a lot of them.

I did this hose the opposite orientation. Cut and cut and still kinks. This sucks. It seems like my only options are to find a different hose that will work, to add a metal coupler section to make a tighter bend, or to put in a non-STI crossover pipe. Blah.




Made a new exhaust hangar bracket. Forgot to get a completed pic. I picked up a gas lens and cup for the tig. What a world of difference. I was able to use ridiculous stickout to get the inside bead of the bracket without any major issue.



Made this bracket for the power steering fluid reservoir. Im not sure what im going to do with this. The stock return hose doesnt fit with the non-sti style upper radiator hose. I bought a bulk length of PS return hose and every way I route it seems to make it kink. I wish there was an alternative to the crappy designed return inlet on the pump so I could change the fitting and either -an it or run it in a different direction.



I lied. the OEM return line "fits" but it looks ghetto and im not using it because I dont like it.


At this point I just started to get angry and went home and today I took a break from the car. I hate the part of a project where you get frustrated with lack of perceived progress and hitting more and more obstacles. Tomorrow some pieces come so I can finish up the coldside IC piping.
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Old 01-06-2014, 08:00 AM   #19
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I got the elbow I was waiting for so I finished up the coldside piping. I was worried about the clearance between the new Tial BOV and the brake booster vacuum line, but I made a bit more space by finagling things around.




Made a new bracket for the power steering fluid reservoir. The other one was a poor design on my part, as I did not even make sure it would work before I made it. After some consulting with Harvey, we decided to raise the reservoir up higher and were able to make the hose not kink or hit the radiator. Im getting more comfortable welding aluminum now that I am getting more torch time. Starting to "click" and my hands/eye/foot coordination is getting better.









I got the power steering high pressure line finished after waiting a while for the correct fitting.

Just the back story on that-
I originally ordered all of the fittings based on a forum post that I found on nasioc. Unfortunately, the one fitting was wrong. Initially, the plan was to keep the OEM hardline from the rack to where it pokes through the subframe on the passenger side. The fitting that I bought was 14x1.5 male to -6AN. The fitting on the OEM line is male as well, so I should have ordered female, not male. At that point, rather than order a new fitting, I decided to just take out the OEM hardline all the way to the rack and run AN the whole way. The oem line is probably the most difficult thing to take out in the car, and i destroyed it with my removal. The fitting I had ended up not being correct for there either so I had to order a new fitting anyways. Rather then get a new oem hardline, I just got the right one for the rack side. I ended up with this fitting.

Amazon.com: Edelbrock/Russell 648070 Power Steering Adapter: AutomotiveAmazon.com: Edelbrock/Russell 648070 Power Steering Adapter: Automotive

I tossed that in the rack. So it goes that fitting to a 45 degree to -6an to a straight end to a 14mmx1.5 banjo on the pump. The AN is wrapped in DEI heat wrap where it passed by the turbo parts.



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Old 01-06-2014, 08:00 AM   #20
stuiephoto
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Finally got the parts needed to finish installing the oil cooler. Advance auto sent me 2 45 degree -an fittings rather than one. I decided to run the lines different than I had planned and just ran both 45's off the sandwich plate.












Made a little shield since the OEM one was taken off.







Heres my planning board. Everyone needs dry erase!
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Old 01-06-2014, 08:01 AM   #21
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Got a few things done. Mounted the front abs tab things. Swapped out the rear cabmer bolts for regular OEM strut bolts. I re-routed the battery cable-- goes through the firewall now rather than following the harness under the driver fender. Harvey and I planned out the cold air intake

I went to advance and browsed their radiator hose selection for 25 minutes and came up with nothing to fix that issue. Harvey and I decided that its worth pulling the coolant crossover pipe off of a legacy to see if it will fit because, short of welding on -AN fittings, there's not any other good options.


So, a few weeks back I made this.

http://i.imgur.com/E60D9eYl.jpg

Now that the car is on the lift, I decided to do something that doesn't require the lift. Typical for me.

Cut out shrouds for gauges.


CNC'ed the adapter rings. Will tack weld these in tomorrow (today?).




It was hard to get the picture to show it well, but each "pod" is recessed in the plate and is angled towards the drivers seat.



Still working out how they mount into the dash. Theres not really any good mounting holes so im working up some bracketry.

I took a break over the past couple weeks. I was getting burned out working 40 hours a week, and then working on this 40 hours a week.

Back at it though. I decided that in order to fix the upper radiator hose issue, I would switch out the coolant crossover to one that matches the radiator. Conveniently, Harvey had a parts car laying around so I pulled the crossover out of that.



Got the intake off.



The older ej25's dont have this vent on top of the block. I had to cut and weld a relief into the crossover to clear the vent. This is the first time I have welded cast aluminum-- hoping that the damn thing holds. I threw extra beads on there just in case.



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Old 01-06-2014, 08:01 AM   #22
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As you can see, the inlet has an angle to it. This will allow the hose to bend less and not kink. Older pic to show what it looked like before.


Quote:

I will need to extend the harness for the OEM temp sensor, as it is in a different location on the new crossover. Need to stop at the dealership to get some gaskets so I can button it all back up. Spent a while cleaning gasket maker from the mating surfaces. My back hurts.

The carbon fiber trunk has horrible fitment. Started working on that. Found that the latch doesn't seat right, and part of the mounting "plate" is separated from the frame of the trunk. Slabbed some JB weld in there to see if it will hold it a bit better, and started modifying the latch to allow the trunk to sit lower. I should be able to get it fitting at least 50% better but I think there will always be a small gap.



Stopped at northtown subaru and they were useless. Not sure how they dont have the intake manifold to TGV gaskets. Got the o-rings though. Will have to stop at innovative today. Worked on a couple other peoject's today so I didn't get a ton done.




Clamped up the upper coolant hose and the PS hose.



I need to fab up a battery box and a coolant reservoir. I'm having trouble finding a place that sells affordable "caps" for the reservoir. All of the weld on/screw on ones are 40+ bucks.
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Old 01-06-2014, 08:02 AM   #23
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I got a new camera for christmas so hopefully the pictures will be a bit better.

Took the front end apart to replace the front outer CV boot due to a pinhole leak. Got it apart to realize that the beck/arnley part number is incorrect-- the boot is the INNER not the outer. Bah. I searched and couldnt find anyone who stocked this so I had to order it from the dealer.








In the meantime, I rented a coolant system pressure tester. Got the modified crossover pipe in and tested the system. After a few fixes, the system held pressure for 5 days. Done! I put the intake manifold back on and started re-connecting the stuff I had removed (fuel lines, plugs, yada yada). I re-routed some stuff to make it easier to take the intake manifold off in the future. I also got the 3" aluminum pipe to make a cold air intake. Still working on how that's going to be routed, as the big K&N filter doesnt have a nice place to fit in the fender.





Got some nice parts for xmas! Thanks a bunch to Mike at Innovative for having this stuff in stock. Make it easy for my parents to shop. Cusco solid motor and transmission mounts, ARP extended wheel studs, and whiteline rear subframe lockdown bolts.



This is the start of my custom coolant overflow.

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Old 01-06-2014, 08:02 AM   #24
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Not too happy with Northtown subaru this week. I had them order me a new CV boot/clamps as I could not find the proper one aftermarket. The boot itself it fine, but the clamps are a joke. It appears that for the small clamp, they just took a generic parts store clamp, wrote the OEM part number on some tape and sold it at OEM price. If I wanted that style clamp I could have bought it on amazon for less than a dollar, not the almost 5 dollars I was charged for it. I know it sounds trivial, but I expect to get OEM parts when I order them and pay oem premium-- or for them to say "we just use this cause its cheaper and works the same, here it is for xx dollars".



The larger of the two clamps IS an oem piece with a real OEM sticker and all. Too bad it appears to be the wrong part. There's no way to get that much slack out of that style clamp. Ill have to look up the part number to verify that it is in fact incorrect.


They didn't have a few pretty common parts that I needed last week. I guess I will just have to order this stuff myself from out of state dealers from now on and pay the ridiculous shipping costs so I know I at least get the right parts. Its sad that something as simple as a CV boot is such a runaround to find parts.

Almost finished the intake. Just need to decide on a bracket location for the fender pipe. Made a cover for the big hole I cut in the inner fender to be able to fit the intake pipe through. Its not 100% done yet but you get the idea. Also replaced the OEM fender bracket with an aluminum piece as the OEM one was bent up and all of the bolts broke off in it. Bonus is that it weighs half as much.




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Old 01-06-2014, 08:03 AM   #25
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Got the ARP wheel studs in. Still havent decided what im doing with the heat shield. I will probably leave it off and duct air into the wheel well. We will see.


New rotors. Harvey stole the rotors that came on the car last minute for a PCA event so he graciously replaced them with new parts.



I managed to break the bolt on the tial vband clamp. I was tightening it and it felt snug but I could still spin the BOV on the flange. Turned it a bit more and just knew it was stripping. Started to back it out and it locked up and snapped. $40 ****ing mistake.



Made a bracket and mounted the coolant reservoir.





Stripped out some un-needed wiring from the harness that crosses the front of the car, loomed it up and ran it. Headlights are now finished. I need to go to storage and get the 95 harness to pull all of the plugs for the blinkers so I can wire those in.

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