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Old 03-30-2001, 11:03 PM   #1
Buck-O
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No, it wouldent do squat.

The purpose of running a ceramic manifold is that the ceramic will disapate heat faster then metal will. Obviously unless you are running a super charger, or a turbo charger, where the air coming into the intake would be heated there would be no need for it. N/A engines have a tendancy to actually cool the air as it enters the manifold, not heat up. So i cant see an reasonable point in doing that.

What will help though is to get a nice polished intake. The smoother the air can travel through the intake, the faster cool air will enter the combustion chamber, and you will get more air into the combustion chamber. Giving you fairly substantial HP increases. But before you even go that far, if you are serious about doing somthing like that. Get head work done firt. A nice port and polish can do wonders.

Hope that helps.
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Old 03-31-2001, 12:16 AM   #2
t.rod
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Post ceramic coating the intake manifold

Would ceramic coating the intake manifold yeild any HP? Would would be the benifets of doing this?
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Old 03-31-2001, 05:36 AM   #3
GavinP
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On the contrary, trying to reduce the temperature of the inlet manifold has been tested in Australia (using manifold insulators) leading to a reduction of 52 degrees F at idle!

See http://www.autospeed.com/A_0401/P_1/article.html

Something to think about anyhow....

Thanks

Gavin
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Old 03-31-2001, 07:44 AM   #4
S.Damery
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FYI, ceramic is an insulator not a conductor. In general ceramics are used for insulating purposes. The tiles on the underside of the Space Shuttle that protect it during re-entry are made of a ceramic composite material.
-Shawn
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Old 03-31-2001, 08:00 AM   #5
SilverSubie
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what i'm gonna do for insulating is just use exhaust/manifold wrap. it will insulate a whole lot better. not to bad for the wallet either for what you get.

-grant
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Old 03-31-2001, 09:57 AM   #6
MrHorspwer
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I have heard bad news about using exhaust wrap. From what I have seen, on a mild steel exhaust it tends to trap moisture and promote rusting of the pipe. As for insulating the manifold... has anyone though of insulating the bottom of the manifold or the underside of a cold air intake system with the hi-temp hoodliner dynamat? I have never seen it done and I'm betting it will have a minimal, if any, effect on inlet air temp. Just a thought... maybe I'll try it someday.
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Old 03-31-2001, 10:37 AM   #7
Reciprocity
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I think doing a ceramic coating of the intake manifold would do a bit more than just crap. Sure it isn't going to give you 50hp, but it will give you some gains.

I would think that the ceramic coating on the inside of the manifold would give you a nice smooth surface as well as insulate against heat soak from the engine. Put another coating on the outside of the mainfold...and it would decrease the amount of heat soak even more, and would look damn purty.

Granted the gains would be minimal...but a gain is a gain ya know? It all adds up...

I'm probably going to do it. I'm never one to turn down a horsepower!

D. Neil Crawford
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Old 03-31-2001, 03:03 PM   #8
MrHorspwer
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What about an extrude hone on the inner manifold? Has it been done... any gains?
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Old 03-31-2001, 04:33 PM   #9
Buck-O
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Sorry, maybe i was a little bass-akward in what i said.

If you wnat to heat sheild it, yeah, great idea. Especiallt if you plan on running it hard. If your going for forced induction, i would definatly consider ceramic coating the intkae and exaust manifolds. But im saying tis a waste becuase the gains fo that would not be noticable unless the car was driven hard, for long periods of time. So the benefits of it wouldent even be noticable to the average driver, under normal use. I dont even think and above average driver would push the car far enough, long enough, to warrent the need for a ceramic coated intake and exaust manifold. If anything, try a heat sheild, or somthing like that. But even then i dont think it would really be worth it.

I had a meugen ceramic coated manifold on my Integra...and other then a bit more throttle responce from the even length downpipes, and 4-2-1 design, the overall performance of it wasnt any better or worse thent hat of a cheap stainless steel header i picked up for $20 at a tuner shop, when i first dropped the b16a1 into the teggy (it was a 1st gen BTW). So from my personal experience its a waste. Unless you go forced induction or a very heavy N/A tune, then i i think it would be worth it.
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Old 03-31-2001, 09:14 PM   #10
XT6Wagon
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While yes it might make a little power, I am SURE that there is much better things to spend money on unless your car is one sick puppy.
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