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Old 04-20-2003, 01:03 PM   #1
strangerq
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Default Dccd.

For those of you who've driven the DCCD cars......what exactly does opening and closing the center dif do to the handling?

I would assume that with the center diff open the torque split is 35 - 65 and the front and rear wheels are allowed to spin as they may - respectively.

With the diff closed I assume no wheel spin is allowed, but does that mean you are still doing 35 - 65 until/unless the rears (most likely) want to spin?

When you move the dccd control slider up and down from open to locked.....what do you actually notice in terms of handling changes?
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Last edited by strangerq; 04-20-2003 at 02:28 PM.
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Old 04-20-2003, 01:22 PM   #2
jaypride
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The center diff is never open. The dccd is either in auto or manual mode, but always on.
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Old 04-20-2003, 01:35 PM   #3
ANZAC_1915
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There was an extended discussion of this a while ago, and I think where we wound up was that in manual mode with the knob fully rearward, the diff was indeed open.

Given that, with the knob fully forward it is locked (and even says so on the dash).

Paul?

Glenn
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Old 04-20-2003, 06:08 PM   #4
archmanzREX04
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Default Re: Dccd.

Quote:
Originally posted by strangerq
When you move the dccd control slider up and down from open to locked.....what do you actually notice in terms of handling changes?
In short: as you adjust the split further rearward, the car will tend to rotate (oversteer) upon application of throttle instead pushing (understeer) normally exhibited by FWD and AWD vehicles. In automatic mode, both the EVO and STi adjust the torque-split during the turn based on accelerometer data (and other sensors) to balance the handling of the car. Turn the knob all the way back and you can hang it out Steve Kinser style!
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Old 04-20-2003, 09:45 PM   #5
shirokuma
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You are mainly adjusting the FWD to RWD bias the car will have under power in corners.

To be very honest, once I experienced the auto mode, I never switched out of it. Unless I'm at a gymkhana, I doubt I ever would.

Cheers,

Paul Hansen
www.apexjapan.com
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Old 04-23-2003, 03:36 PM   #6
akoshy
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Default Re: Re: Dccd.

Quote:
Originally posted by archmanzREX04

In automatic mode, both the EVO and STi adjust the torque-split during the turn based on accelerometer data (and other sensors) to balance the handling of the car.
The STi...yes. The US-spec EVO...NO. The US-spec EVO has a viscous coupler center diff, similar in design to what is available in the manual trans WRX. It splits the torque at 50/50 with very little variability.
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Old 04-23-2003, 06:31 PM   #7
archmanzREX04
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AKOSHY,

Good catch!

I forgot to add in that one very important bit of information, it was the Euro EVO.

Here is a link about the AYC system. They had an awesome PDF datasheet on the EVO VII last year about this...I can't find it anymore. Oh well, enjoy!

http://www.mitsubishi-cars.co.uk/features/ayc.asp
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