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Old 06-24-2003, 05:48 PM   #1
WRX 555 STi
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Default COBB cam install instructions...

Anyone has those laying around somewhere? I am looking for therse as I am putting the cams on new heads (used). Gimme some help here guys!

~Anthony.
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Old 06-24-2003, 07:39 PM   #2
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Step 1 removed old cams and don't break anything.
Installation is the reverse of removal.

Seriously, I do have the instructions, but my scanner is broken.
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Old 06-24-2003, 08:58 PM   #3
WRX 555 STi
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Hmmmm....Anyone else?

~Anthony.
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Old 06-24-2003, 10:25 PM   #4
totoherbs
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call them up im sure theyed be happy to help...
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Old 06-25-2003, 11:05 AM   #5
BOY
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There used to be a set of instruction online, I think Stimpy's old site had em. They also had separate lashing instructions which were gone last time I looked. The old site was www.nothingserious.net IIRC.
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Old 06-25-2003, 03:34 PM   #6
stimpy
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Actually, I'll put them up on my webspace. I don't know how long I'll leave them there but they will be there for a little while.

-Jon
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Old 06-25-2003, 03:35 PM   #7
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Do you have the files from your old website? I would like to see your install, maybe do a mirror to them or something...
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Old 06-25-2003, 03:54 PM   #8
stimpy
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Installation images:
My writeup:
Quote:
"Well I finally received my Cobb Tuning "Street" cams in time for the weekend, so naturally, I installed them. Total install time was about 16 hours with two people (me and a friend). We did NOT use airtools and neither one of us had installed cams before. The install time was inflated by a couple hours because I was installing a legacy turbo waterpump in preperation for my legacy turbo install.

The install instructions are very straight forward except that some of the bolts cannot be tightened down in the order listed (ie: camsprocket bolts weren't torqued until AFTER the timing belt was completely installed).

The overall install is fairly easy except for a few issues I encountered. First of all, those camshaft caps are a B**CH to get off. The factory liquid gasket had to be cut almost all the way around with razor blades before it would release. It probably took us 2.5 hours just removing the camshaft caps.

Next up on the list would be the lack of a Torx 40 Plus bit and camshaft oil seals. Trey was having issues with the machine shop getting these cams cut, so I ended up waiting for the cams a couple weeks longer than he had indicated. Trey was very apologetic and once they did get into his hands, he fired them off to me with overnight delivery . I was very thankful for this, but in the rush, he neglected to add the Torx 40 Plus bit and new camshaft oil seals. I confirmed that my oil seals would be ok to use since my car only has 15k miles on it, but I didn't notice the Torx bit was missing until I had the engine torn down to the camshaft caps. Since I already had the engine torn down, I decided to try the Torx 40 bit. What I found is that the Torx 40 bit will work on a low mileage car. I do not think my car had a long enough time to sieze the bolts into the head, so I wasn't at risk of striping out the bolts because of an incorrectly sized tool. I would still recommend using the Torx 40 Plus however. I wouldn't recommend trying the Torx 40 bit unless you feel comfortable tearing off the heads to pull a stripped bolt.

Last fun thing I experienced on the install was the valves. Setting the valve lash on the flat four is a two person, time consuming job. The intake valves can be set from above the car, but the exhaust valves are set from below the car. Because of the tight quarters, it doesn't seem very possible to set the valve lash solo.

Overall, the install is not that difficult. The instructions are good and all it takes is a little common sense and you will get through the install ok. The instructions on setting valve lash aren't detailed at all, so that is something you should know how to do. Would I attempt to do this install again? Sure thing. I will probably help a friend do this to his EJ25 in the next couple months. Install time without air tools is probably going to run about 6-8 hours. I honestly don't think that air tools are going to save more than 1-2 hours on the overall install time. I do not think they are required to do this install.

Enough of the install... how do they feel? Well they are incredible. They totally change the feel of how the power is delivered. I noticed no loss in power anywhere, only good things. The low end now feels weak because of how reinforced the high end is. I have an iSR intake and a custom 2.25" custom catback with an Apex'i N1 na exhaust and these cams compliment those mods very well. Before the install, it seemed that my car just ran out of oomph at about 5k rpm (granted it still pulled all the way up, just not as hard). With these cams, it still pulls like it did before up to 4.5k rpm, only a little more reinforced, and then it just takes off. It feels like the motor is just finally getting going once the redline kicks in. I think with these breathing mods, a higher redline is justifiable, as its still making good power up there.

I don't have any solid numbers on performance gain, and I probably never will, but my car will now push you back into the seat when accelerating. They are well worth my money. Kudos to Trey for his R&D and thanks to Spazz41 for his assistance on the install. I have to say, the 15min break in period was probably the longest 15min wait I have ever had. "
...

Last edited by stimpy; 06-25-2003 at 04:36 PM.
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Old 06-25-2003, 03:56 PM   #9
stimpy
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More writeup:
Quote:

"Below are some issues I experienced due to the cams. They are listed in chronological order of events.

Something was bound to go wrong. I am currently experiencing a reduction in power. My buddy just recently purchased a MY01 2.5RS and it turns out his car is pulling harder in the midrange. I took my car out and its definitly slower than right after the install. Right now, the car falls flat once it hits 90mph. It takes full throttle to accelerate at all past that (which it does very very slowly). An ECU reset did not help. I figure since it has been over 700 miles since I did the install, it's time to set the valve lash again. The valves are very loud right now and it seems to rev slugishly. This weekend I am going to pull the spark plugs and inspect them, set the valve lash, and make sure the timing is still lined up. I'm hoping it's just the valve lash causing my problems. Don't get me wrong, these cams ROCK. I just need to figure out whats up. If my problem persists after this weekend, I will contact Trey and see what he has to say. My fear is that the cam lobes wore prematurely, but I don't know why they would after a proper breakin period. I may just be naive as well as paranoid. I will keep in touch.

The long awaited weekend is finally over and I was able to set my valve lash. After 845 miles, the time had finally come. The overall experience took me about 4-5 hours to do. The parts all came off with no problems, except for a 10mm socket that disappeared into the engine compartment void (stuck under the crossmember somehwere). It took us forever to actually get the valves set to spec. Everytime we would get the lash set, we would tighten down the locknut, and it would go back out of spec. Overall, I would say we set the lash on every valve atleast 3 times. I am sure this would not be nearly as difficult if the heads were out of the car. We had one person from the top and one person on the bottom while setting the all the exhaust valves. It is amazing how frustrating this procedure can be. The results? Wonderful! All the lost power has now returned. The car once again pushes you back into the seat. The intake sound is louder, once again, and the exhaust note is quieter. It again feels like the redline is too low. For all those that do these cams, just keep in mind that you WILL experience a reduction in power as the cam lobes wear slightly on break in. A simple valve adjustment is all that is needed to restore all the torque and breathing ability present after the initial install.

After another 3000 miles, my car had ticking valves again. I guess the cams were still breaking in. We spent two hours setting the valve lash this time. It is still a long process, but we just about have it down. At the time, we also swapped out my iSR intake for a custom 3" PVC piece. The high-end has been dramatically improved. My car now pulls like I've always known it should.

Eight months after the install, 3 times setting the valve lash (2 times in addition to inital time during install), and 10,000 miles, the cams are still going strong. They seem to have worn down all they are going to wear. The car is still pulling strong and the valves still sound as they should. I have just recently removed my 2.25" cat-back in preperation for my turbo, and all I can say is wow. There is a huge difference between the stock exhaust an an aftermarket one when it comes to having the cams. The car now seems like it is struggling to breathe. It is to be expected though; I am allowing all that extra air into the motor, but providing no way to get it out. That will all change once my 3" mandrel bent system goes on.Below are some issues I experienced due to the cams. They are listed in chronological order of events.

Something was bound to go wrong. I am currently experiencing a reduction in power. My buddy just recently purchased a MY01 2.5RS and it turns out his car is pulling harder in the midrange. I took my car out and its definitly slower than right after the install. Right now, the car falls flat once it hits 90mph. It takes full throttle to accelerate at all past that (which it does very very slowly). An ECU reset did not help. I figure since it has been over 700 miles since I did the install, it's time to set the valve lash again. The valves are very loud right now and it seems to rev slugishly. This weekend I am going to pull the spark plugs and inspect them, set the valve lash, and make sure the timing is still lined up. I'm hoping it's just the valve lash causing my problems. Don't get me wrong, these cams ROCK. I just need to figure out whats up. If my problem persists after this weekend, I will contact Trey and see what he has to say. My fear is that the cam lobes wore prematurely, but I don't know why they would after a proper breakin period. I may just be naive as well as paranoid. I will keep in touch.

The long awaited weekend is finally over and I was able to set my valve lash. After 845 miles, the time had finally come. The overall experience took me about 4-5 hours to do. The parts all came off with no problems, except for a 10mm socket that disappeared into the engine compartment void (stuck under the crossmember somehwere). It took us forever to actually get the valves set to spec. Everytime we would get the lash set, we would tighten down the locknut, and it would go back out of spec. Overall, I would say we set the lash on every valve atleast 3 times. I am sure this would not be nearly as difficult if the heads were out of the car. We had one person from the top and one person on the bottom while setting the all the exhaust valves. It is amazing how frustrating this procedure can be. The results? Wonderful! All the lost power has now returned. The car once again pushes you back into the seat. The intake sound is louder, once again, and the exhaust note is quieter. It again feels like the redline is too low. For all those that do these cams, just keep in mind that you WILL experience a reduction in power as the cam lobes wear slightly on break in. A simple valve adjustment is all that is needed to restore all the torque and breathing ability present after the initial install.

After another 3000 miles, my car had ticking valves again. I guess the cams were still breaking in. We spent two hours setting the valve lash this time. It is still a long process, but we just about have it down. At the time, we also swapped out my iSR intake for a custom 3" PVC piece. The high-end has been dramatically improved. My car now pulls like I've always known it should.

Eight months after the install, 3 times setting the valve lash (2 times in addition to inital time during install), and 10,000 miles, the cams are still going strong. They seem to have worn down all they are going to wear. The car is still pulling strong and the valves still sound as they should. I have just recently removed my 2.25" cat-back in preperation for my turbo, and all I can say is wow. There is a huge difference between the stock exhaust an an aftermarket one when it comes to having the cams. The car now seems like it is struggling to breathe. It is to be expected though; I am allowing all that extra air into the motor, but providing no way to get it out. That will all change once my 3" mandrel bent system goes on."
...
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Old 06-25-2003, 03:59 PM   #10
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Final part of writeup:
Quote:

"Listed below are the steps to set the valve lash on the SOHC EJ25 commonly found in the MY99, MY00, and MY01 2.5RS's. MY98's are totally different, so please don't attempt to set the lash without further instruction.

There are two ways to set the valve lash, one of which takes 2 hours and the other takes about 3 hours. When I first did my cams, I figured that you had to have the timing belt cover off in order to see everything going on with the timing belt (read: timing marks). It helps, but its not necessary. To get the timing belt cover off, you have to remove both radiator fans (two screws at the top and one fan plug on the bottom of each). With those out, you can remove the crank pully by removing the accessory belts, putting your car in 5th gear, standing on the brakes, and having somebody run a long breaker bar. Once the pully is out, you can proceed to remove the 10-15 screws holding the timing belt covers on. From here you can remove your spark plugs and then rotate your motor clockwise with the crankshaft pully bolt. You need line up all the lines on the timing belt gears/pullies to the 12 o'clock position. There should be a timing mark on the gear in the middle and one on each camshaft pully. Now you can remove your valve covers (5 bolts). If the motor has been sitting for a little while, there won't be much oil coming out. With all the lines in 12 o'clock position, your motor should be in top dead center (TDC). This is where all of your cylinders are at rest, but most importantly, cylinder 1 (front passenger side I think, though it says on your coil pack on the intake manifold) is at the top of the compression stroke. This is where you need each cylinder to be when you set the valve lash.

You will need a feeler gauge with .007" and .009". If you don't have one, you can easily pick one up at any autoparts store for a couple bucks. You need to set the valve lash to .007" on the intake side and to .009" on the exhaust side. To do this, you push the feeler gauge in between the valve tappet and the top of the valve. If it is too loose, then you loosen up the 10mm nut on the end of your rocker arm, and with the use of a screwdriver, you can screw the valve tappet down until it is pushing on the feeler gauge. Make sure you still has enough room to move the gauge back and forth, but tight enough that there is not slop if you wiggle the rocker up and down. Now while holding the screwdriver in the slot on the valve tappet (to hold the tappet in place), keeping the feeler gauge under the valve tappet stil, you then screw the 10mm nut back down, securing the valve tappet in place. Recheck the lash with your feeler gauge. If it is still tight, but moderately movable, then you can move on to the next valve; if not, try again. The intake side will be done from the top of the car, and the exhaust side was done with one person below and one person above the car.

Once you have done both the intake and the exhaust side of cylinder #1, you need to rotate the motor slowly clockwise until cylinder #2 (front drivers side) is at the top of the compression stroke. To check this, you just put your hand over the spark plug tube and as the cylinder is coming up, you will feel air pushing on your hand; it will also be giving a hissing sound as air is being pushed around. If you take a flashlight and a mirror and use those to look down into the sparkplug hole, you should be able to see the piston. Once it has stopped moving (top) then you are there. If you wiggle the crankshaft bolt back and forth, you can see where the piston is sitting. Now you repeat the vavle lash procedure for both intake and exhaust side for cylinder #2. Then you cycle the motor over to cyclinder #3 (back passenger side), set the lash, then cycle to cylinder #4 (back drivers side), and set lash.

You are now done with setting the valve lash and you can begin reassembly of the car by putting the valve covers back on, the timing belt cover, the crankshaft pully (torqued back down to 130ft/lbs if its the stock pully), radiator fans, and plugs and wires. Reset your ECU.

The shorter procedure simply bypasses the removal of the timing belt cover. You still have to remove plugs, valve covers, and radiator fans however. Since the crankshaft pully is keyed, it will only go on one way. While rotating the motor around with the spark plugs removed, you should be able to see a little knick or line on the backside of the crankshaft pully. If you watch for the compression on cyl. #1 while rotating the knick up to the top, you should be able to find TDC with the timing belt cover still installed. It should take 720 degrees to rotate the motor through one entire revolution. Once TDC is found, you can follow the steps listed above to set the valve lash then rotate to the next cylinder and repeat.
-Jon
www.nothingserious.net

Trey Cobb's response to the How-To:

Great write-up Stimpy. Here is how we find the position of each cylinder to set lash, which is just slightly different than what Stimpy has written. Setting valve lash on 2.5L SOHC.
1) Remove the radiator overflow bottle.
2) Remove the driver's side section of the timing belt cover (just 3 bolts) to expose the driver's side camshaft sprocket.
3) Remove valve covers and necessary components (we typically pull air filters/boxes and the windshield washer bottle to get better access.)
4) With a 22mm socket and long breaker bar, rotate engine until the ARROW on the driver's side camshaft sprocket is at 12 o'clock (UP). Set the valve lash on the #1 cylinder when camshaft sprocket is in this position.
5) Rotate engine through two revolutions and set ARROW on the camshaft sprocket at 6 o'clock (DOWN). Set the valve lash on the #2 cylinder.
6) Rotate engine again 2 revolutions and set the arrow on the camshaft sprocket at 3 o'clock (RIGHT) (standing in front of engine bay). Set the valve lash on the #3 cylinder.
7) Rotate engine again 2 revolutions and set the arrow on the camshaft sprocket at 9 o'clock (LEFT). Set the valve lash on the #4 cylinder.
8) Put everything back together and test drive. This might be more exact if for some reason you can't tell the exact position of each cylinder. Plus, it makes it easier than pulling all the timing covers off. We rotate the engine 2 rotations to give the cam a full turn (it turns 1/2 speed of the crank) and recheck the lash on the cylinder we just set before going to the next. It's not a requirement, but it's a good QA step. Other than that, the lash adjustments Jon (Stimpy) wrote were dead on. Make sure you keep the feeler gauge on the same "plane" as the top of the valve. If you have it in at an angle, you might set the valve lash too high and it'll be noisy. Take your time, and you'll get it right. It is definitely something you begin to get a feel for after you've done it a few (hundred ) times. Enjoy!
Trey
Cobb Tuning
http://www.cobbtuning.com/ "


Enjoy,
-Jon
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Old 06-25-2003, 04:33 PM   #11
DanzBorin
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all 7 links go to the same page...
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Old 06-25-2003, 04:36 PM   #12
stimpy
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lol

It is fixed now.

-Jon
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Old 06-25-2003, 05:33 PM   #13
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Stimpy, you're the man! BTW, here's a link from another thread in this forum that covers valve lash in a slightly different fashion: http://www.mygyroplane.com/overhaulej22.pdf . Looks like its a few less rotations of the crank.
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Old 06-25-2003, 06:43 PM   #14
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Thanks Stimpy I'll use them later.
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Old 06-25-2003, 07:39 PM   #15
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Default Re: COBB cam install instructions...

Quote:
Originally posted by WRX 555 STi
Anyone has those laying around somewhere? I am looking for therse as I am putting the cams on new heads (used). Gimme some help here guys!

~Anthony.
When are you going to have your cams installed, and by whom? I'm in agreement, with another MWIC member, to buy his cams but I need someone who can install them in my car.
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Old 06-25-2003, 08:20 PM   #16
WRX 555 STi
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Doing it myself. Cams, head gaskets, and putting my engine back together in the car.
Everthing is possible with instructions

~Anthony.
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Old 06-26-2003, 08:24 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally posted by WRX 555 STi
Doing it myself. Cams, head gaskets, and putting my engine back together in the car.
Everthing is possible with instructions

~Anthony.
When you planning on doing the install? If you have no issues with yours, I could an install too.
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