Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Saturday August 23, 2014
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
Click here to visit TireRack
Tire & Wheel Forum sponsored by The Tire Rack

Losing traction? Need new tires?
Click here to visit the NASIOC Upgrade Garage...
Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences Home Registration is free! Visit the NASIOC Store NASIOC Rules Search Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Calendar Archive NASIOC Upgrade Garage Logout
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Tire & Wheel

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-24-2003, 01:03 PM   #51
Z1 Performance
Former Vendor
 
Member#: 9327
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Z1Auto.com
Default

surprised noone posted this yet:

http://www.tirerack.com/wheels/tech/offset.htm
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Z1 Performance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2003, 12:25 AM   #52
SlideWRX
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 3803
Join Date: Jan 2001
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: South Carolina
Vehicle:
07 Mustang GT
285 is a wide tire!

Default

To throw some weight behind the bearings just sucking in the first place, wrxhackers asked gary sheehan (touring car racer) some questions. Of the stock pieces he kept, the wheel bearing have given him the most grief.

http://www.wrxhackers.com/modules.ph...ewtopic&t=1006

Admittedly stock items aren't made for racing, but food for thought.

Tom

P.S. I have rota's (48mm offset) and my front wheel bearings are getting louder. 37,000 miles. rota's only on for >10,000, so don't think they specifically caused this, but who knows.
SlideWRX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-27-2003, 01:28 AM   #53
aspera
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 7879
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: east of Zzyzx
Default

That sounds like an opportunity for the vendors.
aspera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2003, 11:10 AM   #54
subysouth
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 5039
Join Date: Mar 2001
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Vehicle:
2007 Outback XT
Grey 5-speed

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by Z1 Performance
surprised noone posted this yet:

http://www.tirerack.com/wheels/tech/offset.htm
Hmmmm this thread is still alive? I guess its like religion, hard to find a common ground on.

Lemme copy and paste from that link.

Quote:
If the offset of the wheel is not correct for the car, the handling can be adversely affected. When the width of the wheel changes, the offset also changes numerically.
I think this what you were referring to? I hate to disagree with our sponsors, but the above is incorrect. Offset is a defined parameter of the wheel at maunfacture, it does not change as the wheel gets wider unless the manufacturer wants it that way. Offset can be designed into a mold or measured after the wheel is made, but it does not, by its own volition, change. Tire rack has assigned independent action to a inanimate parameter, its just not possible. Offset IS. You could say "For proper fitment, offset SHOULD be changed when going to a wider wheel."

I see in all these responses, no one has actually answered the fundamental question: Why do wheels have an offset to begin with? What is the purpose of offset? If you can answer that, you will see why there is an inherent ideal offset.

I know there are a lot of vendors that want to sell what they have, and I know they sell great products and I know Subaru has made a real PITA of itself with their radically high offsets, but they are what they are. The vast majority of Subaru OEM wheels, even up to 7.5" wide, are mid50s positive offset and there is a good reason for this. I also know it costs a ton more money for an aftermarket manufacturer to exceed +48mm for, relatively speaking, a limited market.

I dont doubt you could use a +48mm wheel for years with no probs, the point, I thought, of this thread was to establish the ground rules of what and why offset is what it is. Pragmatically, Bridrive's "solution" is superior to the lower offsets found on many aftermarket "Subaru-specific" wheels but it is based upon incorrect reasoning and is some cases falls short of Subarus own OEM offerings in those widths. This in itself indicates the flaw in the theory and gives a hint to why there is offset.

I simpler solution would be run the specific offset of your vehicle to as high a width as your car can accomodate(and as you can buy) without rubbing.

I will say this again, IMO there is an ideal offset for each application and this ideal offset does not vary. The offset wheel you choose to run CAN be varied to suit fitment issues with wider wheels, but the ideal offset of the vehicle does not change.

ss
subysouth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2003, 11:22 AM   #55
Z1 Performance
Former Vendor
 
Member#: 9327
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Z1Auto.com
Default

SS - I think you might be missing the point though - what Tire Rack is saying is that by design, aftermarket wheel manufacturers alter offset as they alter width.......it is inherent in their manufacturing. Given what youa re talking about, you can alter width without changing offset, but then you enter into a very narrow realm of wheels that actually work, and to this date, I have not seen any proof one way or the other that the way its historically done by every aftermarket wheel manufacturer is a "worse" way.

So that leaves you with the option of going to Kinensis, HRE, Simmons, Fikse and the like, who can literally make you whatever you want since their wheels are completely of a modular design. The trade off of course, is the cost and wait time.
Z1 Performance is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2003, 11:42 AM   #56
subysouth
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 5039
Join Date: Mar 2001
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Vehicle:
2007 Outback XT
Grey 5-speed

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by Z1 Performance
SS - I think you might be missing the point though - what Tire Rack is saying is that by design, aftermarket wheel manufacturers alter offset as they alter width.......it is inherent in their manufacturing. Given what youa re talking about, you can alter width without changing offset, but then you enter into a very narrow realm of wheels that actually work, and to this date, I have not seen any proof one way or the other that the way its historically done by every aftermarket wheel manufacturer is a "worse" way.

So that leaves you with the option of going to Kinensis, HRE, Simmons, Fikse and the like, who can literally make you whatever you want since their wheels are completely of a modular design. The trade off of course, is the cost and wait time.
I do totally see the point but I am a bit of a stickler on nomenclature. That statement, in a vacuum, is incorrect. It could be very confusing to someone with less automotive experience.

I believe I know what they meant and I also agree what they are suggesting probably has only limited downside. However, IMO, it can be real helpful at times to step back to baseline and and figure the why and what of things. Then you can assess what compromises you are comfortable with. For instance I can think of at least one online wheel seller that will sell you a +38mm 7" wide wheel "ideal" for your Subaru. Thats outside my compromise range.

A lot of the aftermarket produce wheels wider than OEM(which many of us want,) and therefore are forced to reduce offset to avoid strut body rub. I do realize my approach would severely limit the wheels available. Up until very recently, all the upgrade wheels for my Subarus came from the OEM parts bin. However, I have finally bought a set of wheels I really like in +48mm and I am curious to see how they are going to be on my car. I am compromising because I really like the look and weight of the wheels, but I cant compromise much when it comes to the actual principles at the heart of this discussion.

ss
subysouth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2003, 12:48 PM   #57
Heather
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 11627
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Chico, CA
Question

Quote:
Originally posted by subysouth
I have finally bought a set of wheels I really like in +48mm and I am curious to see how they are going to be on my car. I am compromising because I really like the look and weight of the wheels, but I cant compromise much when it comes to the actual principles at the heart of this discussion.
ss
So which wheels did you buy? Are they 17 x 7.5" or 17 x 7"?

Heather
Heather is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2003, 03:41 PM   #58
subysouth
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 5039
Join Date: Mar 2001
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Vehicle:
2007 Outback XT
Grey 5-speed

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by Heather


So which wheels did you buy? Are they 17 x 7.5" or 17 x 7"?

Heather
17x7 +48mm. 5spokers. I actually dont know who the manufacturer is. I was gonna post a pic to see if anybody recognized them.

ss
subysouth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2003, 06:54 PM   #59
wrx2.0 555
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 21383
Join Date: Jul 2002
Chapter/Region: South East
Vehicle:
2010 Trek
EX-5

Default

I think everyone that has been apart of this thread needs to go back and SLOWLY read the original post by BRIDRIVE.

He made ALL of the relevant points ACCURATELY, the first time. Its just that no one has taken the time to either read or understand HIS explanation.

You should give him the credit he deserves. All this thread has done is rehash what he said in the first place.

Heather---You'd think everybody would believe the Bible, but they dont, so dont believe everything in that MRT book.
wrx2.0 555 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2003, 11:12 PM   #60
SubaH6
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 38460
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia.
Vehicle:
2005 Liberty 3.0R B
Obsidian Black

Default

Bridrive has an interesting theory, but it will not always work in practice.

Heather maybe able to help with this one, what is the standard rim offset for a Legacy? The reason I ask is that a Legacy is basically the same as an Outback, but I think the offsets are different. My Outback is ET48 standard, but I don't know what the offset is for the Legacy. If it is different to the Outback then this poses the question as to why a different offset for the same basic vehicle. Subaru likes to share components between different vehicles to keep costs down so the bearings are probably the same and if this is so it kind of puts a hole in Bridrives theory if the offset is different.
SubaH6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-28-2003, 11:13 PM   #61
SlideWRX
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 3803
Join Date: Jan 2001
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: South Carolina
Vehicle:
07 Mustang GT
285 is a wide tire!

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by subysouth
I see in all these responses, no one has actually answered the fundamental question: Why do wheels have an offset to begin with? What is the purpose of offset? If you can answer that, you will see why there is an inherent ideal offset.
ss
Wheel have an offset for several reasons:
1. maintain wheel geometry. Imagine those 'bling' wire mesh 13 inch rims sticking out several inches from the body; when they turn they significantly change the geometry of the suspension. They move forward and backward relative to the suspension arms. Engineers can try to design for this, but they choose to try and keep the tire in the same spot. Load transferral is more consistent this way.

2. packaging space. the less space the wheel takes up turning (avoiding rubbing against something) the more space available for styling and engine and suspension pieces and whatever else the engineers need to put on the vehicle at that time. the more it turns 'within' itself (the same space) the less space it takes up.

3. I guess it all comes down to maintaining suspension geometry with several benefits, including consistent & better handling, NVH, bearing loads and other items.

with the offset we have Subaru can package the pivot very nearly at the center of the wheel. Why did subaru choose this offset instead of what others are using? Given a clean sheet design they can pretty much set it at whatever they want, but they are using a design that has worked well for probably ten or more years. I'm guessing that the extra room afforded by moving out offsets was valuable.

Tom
SlideWRX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2003, 09:31 AM   #62
subysouth
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 5039
Join Date: Mar 2001
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Vehicle:
2007 Outback XT
Grey 5-speed

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by SlideWRX


Wheel have an offset for several reasons:
1. maintain wheel geometry. Imagine those 'bling' wire mesh 13 inch rims sticking out several inches from the body; when they turn they significantly change the geometry of the suspension. They move forward and backward relative to the suspension arms. Engineers can try to design for this, but they choose to try and keep the tire in the same spot. Load transferral is more consistent this way.

2. packaging space. the less space the wheel takes up turning (avoiding rubbing against something) the more space available for styling and engine and suspension pieces and whatever else the engineers need to put on the vehicle at that time. the more it turns 'within' itself (the same space) the less space it takes up.

3. I guess it all comes down to maintaining suspension geometry with several benefits, including consistent & better handling, NVH, bearing loads and other items.

with the offset we have Subaru can package the pivot very nearly at the center of the wheel. Why did subaru choose this offset instead of what others are using? Given a clean sheet design they can pretty much set it at whatever they want, but they are using a design that has worked well for probably ten or more years. I'm guessing that the extra room afforded by moving out offsets was valuable.

Tom
1. Good reason to maintain stock offset.

2. Good reason for a higher offset. There are other components that have to be considered before you can say the wheel turns within a smaller footprint tho.

3. I think we have a winner here.

As it was explained to me, the reason for offset(a specific number for each application) is to center the mass and load of the wheel over the hub and bearings. It is a measurable and singular figure and its the reason the concept of offset was invented and why offset is measured off the centerline of the wheel, not the front or the back.

In simplest description, you could say the appropriate load distance for (X) vehicle from the mounting face to the bearings designed sweet spot is (Y)mm. Meaning the design of the hub/knuckle/bearing assembly dictates what the ideal offset is for a particular vehicle. If that offset is maintained, no matter what the width of the wheel, equal additional(or less) increment of width is distributed(or subtracted) equally inside and outside the sweet spot dictated by the offset.


Thats my prob with Bridrive's theory. The ratio of wheel inside and outside the face is not important as long as the offset is maintained. The offset itself centers the load over the hub.

ss
subysouth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2003, 09:35 AM   #63
Heather
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 11627
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Chico, CA
Default

Quote:
Originally posted by SubaH6


Heather maybe able to help with this one, what is the standard rim offset for a Legacy?
The stamp on the 2002 Legacy GT wheels says 55 just like the WRX wheels.

Heather
Heather is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2003, 09:57 AM   #64
SubaH6
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 38460
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia.
Vehicle:
2005 Liberty 3.0R B
Obsidian Black

Default

Well there you go. Heather's Legacy has ET55 offset and my Outback has ET48 offset, so on an essentially the same vehicle (an Outback is basically a jacked up Legacy), Subaru has put two entirely different offsets with the same rim width.

While I like BriDrives "theory" regarding how to calculate offsets when changing rim widths, I think real world applications make it just that, a theory. When applying it to our vehicles many other factors arise (like many have pointed out) like suspension components and fenders etc which dictate our choice of offset. It just isn't as simple as his theory. Nothing substitutes for measurements when seeing if a particular rim offset would fit, as I have pointed out in a previous post. When I did my measurements for my new rims I was spot on as to where the new rims would sit in relation to the vehicle.
SubaH6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2003, 10:41 AM   #65
wrx2.0 555
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 21383
Join Date: Jul 2002
Chapter/Region: South East
Vehicle:
2010 Trek
EX-5

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by SubaH6
[b]While I like BriDrives "theory" regarding how to calculate offsets when changing rim widths, I think real world applications make it just that, a theory. When applying it to our vehicles many other factors arise (like many have pointed out) like suspension components and fenders etc which dictate our choice of offset. [b]
This is way I said "SLOWLY" read Bridrives explanation. He alreaddy pointed that out at the beginning of his theory.

And I qoute:

"One variable is clearance of the suspension, the other variable is load displacement over the wheel. Unfortunately, in the extreme, these variables will work against each other."

And another:

"There is a balance to maintain in increasing wheel width between load displacement (bearing life we keep hearing about) and inside clearance. If one were only to consider bearing life as important, then you would have to subscribe to the 82.1/17.9 ratio theory. Problem with this, is that as you increased width you would rapidly run out of clearance room. If you were only to subscribe to the clearance is important theory, then you would rapidly wear down the wheel bearing as you increased your width. The theories mutually exclude each other. "

This says it all....
wrx2.0 555 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2003, 11:29 AM   #66
subysouth
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 5039
Join Date: Mar 2001
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Vehicle:
2007 Outback XT
Grey 5-speed

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by wrx2.0 555


This is way I said "SLOWLY" read Bridrives explanation. He alreaddy pointed that out at the beginning of his theory.

And I qoute:

"One variable is clearance of the suspension, the other variable is load displacement over the wheel. Unfortunately, in the extreme, these variables will work against each other."

And another:

"There is a balance to maintain in increasing wheel width between load displacement (bearing life we keep hearing about) and inside clearance. If one were only to consider bearing life as important, then you would have to subscribe to the 82.1/17.9 ratio theory. Problem with this, is that as you increased width you would rapidly run out of clearance room. If you were only to subscribe to the clearance is important theory, then you would rapidly wear down the wheel bearing as you increased your width. The theories mutually exclude each other. "

This says it all....
I should probably let this go, but you seem to be under the impression we cant read, slowly or otherwise.

The first quote has been stated here so often as to be common knowledge.

The ratio theory, which is the basis and unique part of Bridrive's theory, is just incorrect. Bearing load is the fundametal upon which offset is based, and Bri ratio theory has nothing to do with the bearing load. The correct offset builds equitable bearing load into whatever wheel width is used. Further his suggestions for offset have been exceeded within the OEM parts bin. So his suggestion to step down offset at all is a bit moot. Subaru has used a 7.5" +53mm wheel on the NewAge platform with no clearance issues whatsoever. SO how can you say clearance dictates reducing offset at that wheel width.

As I stated above pragamatically Bri's theory is "better" than some aftermarket offerings but still falls short of the ideal-which has already been used on that specific platform by Subaru themselves. Its like saying dont stick your hand in the fire because the Keebler elves told you not to, right move-wrong reason.

I would encourage anyone with a new idea to post it for all of us to take a look at. I am glad Bridrive posted his theory, it spurred a nice new discussion on offset.

ss
subysouth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2003, 11:50 AM   #67
BriDrive
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 21801
Join Date: Jul 2002
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: 90 Degrees North
Vehicle:
2013 Jacked Up T4R

Default

SubySouth...I'm quoting myself down there...Do you disagree that a wider wheel displaces the same weight over more area. If not, then the only point I was trying to make was that I have proved that the ONLY offset where the weight would still be equally displaced with different wheel widths is at zero offset (hub is centered directly over center of wheel) Tell me where my example went wrong down there...BriDrive

"I beg to differ: your point on offset/load displacement only holds true IF AND ONLY IF your offset is always ZERO. 53mm offset on a 6.5” wheel will certainly and definitely have a different load displacement than a 7” wheel with 53mm offset. To validate this, I’ll use a random load number for the right front wheel. Lets say that 960 lbs needs to be displaced over a 6.5” wide wheel (165.1 mm). That equates to 5.815 lbs/mm. On the 6.5” wheel with 53mm offset, there are 135.55 mm to the inside to displace weight and 29.55 mm to the outside to displace weight. That’s 788.22 lbs to the inside and 171.78 lbs to the outside. (This incidentally is the 82.1% ratio I talked about because I used the stock wheel) The important point here is that there are 5.815 lbs/mm displaced. On a 7” wide wheel (177.8mm) the wheel only needs to support 5.399 lbs/mm. If you maintain a 53mm offset on this wheel, there are 141.9 mm to the inside and 35.9 mm to the outside. That’s 766.1 lbs to the inside and 193.9 lbs to the outside. That’s equivalent to a 79.8% ratio."
BriDrive is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2003, 12:13 PM   #68
wrx2.0 555
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 21383
Join Date: Jul 2002
Chapter/Region: South East
Vehicle:
2010 Trek
EX-5

Default

subysouth- I guess I shouldnt have been quite so cocky with that. I didnt mean any disrespect.

It just seems that for every alternate explanation, i can go back to Bridrives orginal post and see where he either acknowledged the point or said the same thing.

It just seems to keep getting repeated in different terminology.

OR, Maybe its just me being a dumb@$$

Scott
wrx2.0 555 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2003, 12:39 PM   #69
subysouth
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 5039
Join Date: Mar 2001
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Vehicle:
2007 Outback XT
Grey 5-speed

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by BriDrive
SubySouth...I'm quoting myself down there...Do you disagree that a wider wheel displaces the same weight over more area. If not, then the only point I was trying to make was that I have proved that the ONLY offset where the weight would still be equally displaced with different wheel widths is at zero offset (hub is centered directly over center of wheel) Tell me where my example went wrong down there...BriDrive

"I beg to differ: your point on offset/load displacement only holds true IF AND ONLY IF your offset is always ZERO. 53mm offset on a 6.5” wheel will certainly and definitely have a different load displacement than a 7” wheel with 53mm offset. To validate this, I’ll use a random load number for the right front wheel. Lets say that 960 lbs needs to be displaced over a 6.5” wide wheel (165.1 mm). That equates to 5.815 lbs/mm. On the 6.5” wheel with 53mm offset, there are 135.55 mm to the inside to displace weight and 29.55 mm to the outside to displace weight. That’s 788.22 lbs to the inside and 171.78 lbs to the outside. (This incidentally is the 82.1% ratio I talked about because I used the stock wheel) The important point here is that there are 5.815 lbs/mm displaced. On a 7” wide wheel (177.8mm) the wheel only needs to support 5.399 lbs/mm. If you maintain a 53mm offset on this wheel, there are 141.9 mm to the inside and 35.9 mm to the outside. That’s 766.1 lbs to the inside and 193.9 lbs to the outside. That’s equivalent to a 79.8% ratio."
Bri at zero offset is the only place at which the ratio you are using for offset determination will be maintained. My position is the ratio approach negates the principle upon which offset is based. Offset is based on the fixed distance from the mounting face to the sweet spot over the bearings. Thats what I was saying earlier, offset introduces a discontinuity into your ratio theory, but the ratio theory doesnt follow(or have anything to do with) the reason for offset. As you go to a wider and wider wheel the fixed 53-55mm correct offset is mathematically diminished using your ratio theory. The correct offset is a fixed physical dimension built into the design of the hub/knuckle bearing assembly and doesnt change. It by nature divides all additional width equally based on the bearing load sweet spot.

ss
subysouth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-29-2003, 12:43 PM   #70
subysouth
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 5039
Join Date: Mar 2001
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Ocean Springs, MS
Vehicle:
2007 Outback XT
Grey 5-speed

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by wrx2.0 555
subysouth- I guess I shouldnt have been quite so cocky with that. I didnt mean any disrespect.

It just seems that for every alternate explanation, i can go back to Bridrives orginal post and see where he either acknowledged the point or said the same thing.

It just seems to keep getting repeated in different terminology.

OR, Maybe its just me being a dumb@$$

Scott
no probs, it is a really subtle and complicated point. Basically its the ratio part thats the prob. The correct offset(+hub depth) centers the load over the bearings.

ss
subysouth is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 01:43 AM   #71
SubaH6
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 38460
Join Date: Jun 2003
Location: Sydney, Australia.
Vehicle:
2005 Liberty 3.0R B
Obsidian Black

Default

If offset is so critical for bearing life, then why does Subaru use two different offsets for the essentially the same platform/bearing set up in the Legacy/Outback, as I stated in my last post.
The Legacy uses a 55mm offset and my Outback uses a 48mm offset with the same width rim.

This is what I've been trying to put across, maybe not very well. I believe the bearing issue as not as relevant as some are making out or it may not be as critical in the Legacy/Outback platform as it is in the Impreza platform. Maybe someone can shed some light on this aspect.
SubaH6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-30-2003, 02:49 AM   #72
aspera
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 7879
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: east of Zzyzx
Default

OK. Given that most of you agree that the center of the wheel should ideally be directly inline with the center of the bearings, I have a few questions.

How wide are the bearings? I mean, if they are 25mm wide (guessing), then that seems to be the safe zone. If they are only 5mm, then the wheel offset safety zone would be narrower.

How far from the mounting face are the bearings? What is the "offset" of the bearings relative to the mounting face? What is the "offset" to the center of the bearings relative to the mounting face?

Is there anyway to move the strut inboard, away from the wheel? How would this "offset" strut mess up the suspension geometry? Let's say you had an adaptor between the two lower strut bolts and the knuckle. You also had adjustable strut top mounts.
aspera is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2004, 09:50 AM   #73
Peaty
Techno Sapien
Moderator
 
Member#: 449
Join Date: Oct 1999
Chapter/Region: MWSOC
Location: Lawrence, KS
Vehicle:
2010 Legacy 3.6R Lim
Azurite Blue Pearl

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by Heather
2002 L.L. Bean H6 Outback (I had one) has a 16 x 6.5" wheel with a 55mm offset, not 48mm.
Then you had the wrong wheels, my OB's' both a 97 and an 02' OB VDC Wagon have 48 stamped on the rim, this is from the 02 Legacy/ Outback service manual:

Peaty is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-30-2004, 10:11 AM   #74
Heather
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 11627
Join Date: Oct 2001
Location: Chico, CA
Default

Yes my mistake. We've had 10 Subarus and they get confused. I was thinking of the GT wheels that are stamped 55mm offset and not the Outback. I soon forget Outbacks entirely now that we have two WRX wagons
Heather
Heather is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-31-2004, 09:06 PM   #75
aspera
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 7879
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: east of Zzyzx
Default

48mm offset factory wheels? Cool. I also like how 225s were used on 6 1/2" wheels. Of course 60 series is pretty tall.

So a 7mm difference is okay on those (heavier) Legacy Outbacks.
aspera is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
wheel offset difference, which way to go in this situation? irish44j Autocross 5 11-22-2009 11:55 AM
Considering this EVO, good idea on this particular car? MF-DIF Off-Topic 19 03-04-2008 03:39 PM
Anyone know the offset of this wheel? subysouth Tire & Wheel 9 08-28-2005 10:48 PM
what determine wheel offset? can I take vw wheels and rotors? etam Brakes, Steering & Suspension 9 05-27-2002 02:32 PM
WRX wheel offset w/body kit, does this look funny to u? JayGold Newbies & FAQs 1 06-13-2001 08:46 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:58 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2014 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2014, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.