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Old 01-06-2004, 02:40 PM   #1
stimpy
Homicidal Maniac
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Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: Austin, TX
Vehicle:
2008 STI

Default Installation times

Well, folks, after two weeks and two days, the car runs. Here is my original thread with some of the goings on

I'd like to start out by giving an idea of just how involved this project is. The two conversions that I saw any kind of documentation and timeframe on both extended well beyond a month of work. My goal was to have the car down for no more than two weeks. In reality, I spent about 8 hours on wiring before the car went down, prepped the engine well in advance, and overshot my deadline by a single day (had to take a sick day yesterday to ensure the car got done). Not too bad if I do say so myself.

Time spent included the following:
  • all weekends (8 hour days) from 12/20 to 1/4
  • 4-5 half days at work (which really only consisted of about 4 hours of actual daylight)
  • Christmas
  • day before New Year's
  • New Year's
  • all day yesterday (1/5)

That totals up to a very inaccurate 115 hours including wiring. All in all, I had help for about 36 of those hours where the rest I did solo.

Wiring breakdown?
  • 20 hours spent in the basement removing obsolete wires.
  • 2 hours stripping dash area down to the firewall
  • 5 hours on initial chassis harness integration
  • 8 hours finalizing integration, routing wires in engine bay, and reinstalling interior.

That totals up to an inaccurate sum of 35 hours. I had help figuring out the wiring harness in the basement for only 4 hours. 5 hours of help was utilized during initial integration. The rest I did solo.

*Note: this excludes the many many many hours spent pouring over diagrams and working things out without even looking at the actual harness.

I'll bet you are looking at the 115 hours invested and thinking I'm crazy. Lemme help ease your worry a little.

Since I knew I was getting a WRX crossmember with my drivetrain, I went ahead and sourced some WRX wagon control arms which had the wider front control arm front bushing. Being paranoid about half-assed jobs, I chose this route where many just shim the bushing. There was an hour or two invested in removal and installation of the control arms.

The crossmember itself was bent so there was time spent troubleshooting trying to determine WHAT was actually bent. In the end, I installed a brand new crossmember and reverted back to my original crontrol arms. The 'I can't think of the name right now spindles' that attach the hubs to the control arms were seized into the control arms so time was spent taking them apart (and breaking a punch INSIDE the spindle and removing that punch).

I chose to install a late-model gastank from a Forester to retain the emissions equipment necessary for a 100% emissions compliant install. It was not a direct bolt-on (or maybe I just overlooked some things) so I spent 4 hours removing parts to get to the gastank, 4-5 hours scratching my head and installing the gastank solo. With help on the day after, the gastank was removed again, gone over, and reinstalled with a satisfactory install job.

A/C gave me problems throughout and, in the end, I chose to just remove it. A few hours were invested removing the A/C system in it's entirety.

Finally, most of the work was done solo. This burns up a ton of time because a lot of the problems that must be tackled require a fresh brain and a new pair of eyes. I had help removing the old engine and reinstalling the new one. I also had help installing the gastank the second time (way faster with two people). Lastly, I had help making the final decisions on how to run the power to the engine management harness and during the initial splicing into the chassis harness.

*Note: I don't know about your friends/helpers, but my helpers had to be explicitly asked each and every time they were needed. If they weren't called the night before, I could count on doing it solo. Usually, with my group of friends, if a project is going down then it is implied that help is needed until completion. This was not the case during this monumental install. In the end, the friend that was dealing with relationship trouble, and usually the one who flakes completely on installs, was the one who helped.

*more to come*
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Last edited by stimpy; 01-09-2004 at 05:59 PM.
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Old 01-07-2004, 05:05 PM   #2
stimpy
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2008 STI

Default Installation notes

Now I'd like to detail some of the mechanical installation points.

I had the unique situation where I tried both the WRX crossmember and the Legacy turbo crossmember.

First of all, the turbo crossmember (Legacy turbo or otherwise) mates up just fine with the chassis; the bolt holes line up perfectly. The WRX crossmember does have tabs located at the front of the crossmember where the U-beam mounts. These mounting tabs hit a metal flaring on the bottom of my frame. For easy fitting, just bend the flaring out of the way. They also conflict with the plastic undertray located in the corners of the front bumper. These will have to be trimmed before they can all bolt back together.

The WRX crossmember has a wider front control arm front bushing. Numerous people have reported success with simply shimming this bushing location and using their stock control arms. I didn't like that solution so I chose to source some WRX wagon control arms. They did, in fact, fit perfectly as far as size and front bushing fitment go. The problem I encountered (and why I'm using a Legacy turbo crossmember) is that my WRX crossmember was bent. As such, I am not using the WRX wagon control arms.

The engine itself will drop right into place and all engine mounts should bolt up without issue. Due to my original, bent WRX crossmember, I experienced fitment issues where the pitchstop would not bolt in properly. This should not be experienced. The lower engine mounts, as always, require a bit of pushing to get the studs to drop down into the slots on the crossmember. This is normal.

The lower radiator hose did give me some issues. I am using a WRX PWR radiator and so I had to tweak some things. However, I believe the lower radiator hose location should be the same whether an aftermarket WRX radiator is used or just your stock radiator. In any case, I could not find a lower radiator hose that fit properly. I purchased a Legacy turbo lower radiator hose and, much to my dismay, sat at the wrong angle and pinched. I finally settled an an OK fitting hose that I found at Autozone. The upper radiator hose (a WRX piece) fit just fine for me after trimming it slightly to compensate for the slight difference in chassis designs. This piece will be dictated by the radiator being used.

If you do choose to go with a WRX radiator, you will have fitment issues with the A/C condensor at the front of the car. There is a fitting in the lower passenger side that will hit the WRX radiator. You may be able to shift this to the passenger side a little bit; I chose to remove the entire A/C assembly. The pins that the radiator fan assemblies use to locate themselves are different on the WRX radiator. This means you have to either sit your stock fans about 1.5 inches off to one side of the radiator or make a custom mounting piece. I am going to purchase WRX radiator fans to correct this problem. They will need to be wired in using my old connectors, but they will fit properly.

The intercooler, intercooler hoses, intercooler brackets, airbox, and airbox hose all mated up perfectly. The mounting holes for the airbox even matched up perfectly. I did remove my existing silencer in the process of installing my airbox, however. Currently, the airbox pulls air from the fender and it probably pulls air from the engine bay once that reserve is used up. I will be cutting out a corner of the front of my bumper (where the stock fogs go on a '96) to allow some fresh air into the fender.

I used a ScoobySport downpipe and the stock downpipe-back exhaust from a WRX. As has been stated previously, one exhaust hanger is in a different location and will go unused on the car. This exhaust hanger is the one located at the neck just forward of the muffler. I don't think it is going to be a problem going without that hanger since my exhaust is very solidly mounted once I slipped it over the transmission exhaust bracket.

The entire engine assembly and intercooler fit perfectly under my STi Ver II hood. At first it appeared like it was going to hit a fitting on the turbo inlet pipe, but it turns out that was caused by the bent WRX crossmember. There are two complaints I have about fitment. Firstly, the intercooler itself sits a little lower than I would like. Because of this, you can see the top of the IC through the hood scoop. Not all of the incoming air will make contact with the IC so I will be fabbing up some sort of air ducting to direct the air down and through the IC. Secondly, the engine is a tight fight between the frame rails. It looks like previous EJ20s also had the perpendicular sparkplugs (according to the valve cover) so this just may be how it is but access to the sparkplugs is going to be TIGHT. It will probably require a universal joint, numerous extensions, and a bit of luck to change them.

I originally was under the impression that the WRX throttle cable is needed for the engine. This is necessitated by the change in position of the throttle linkage from the driver's side to the passenger side. However, I was able to just feed my existing throttle cable over to the driver's side by rerouting it and some other things. In my opinion, there is no need to buy the $45 WRX throttle cable when you can use your existing one. The locking cams look to be different so I also don't know how compatible it will actually be.

My swap came with the WRX fuel pump cage with the understanding that it will just be dropped right into the gas tank. The problem with this is that the fuel tank lines are all wrong for it to work easily. I did put in a new tank that had provisions for the newer line arrangement, however it still posed a problem attaching the fuel lines at the driver's side of the fuel tank just in front of the rear wheel. My solution, then was to use my newer gastank with my old fuel lines and fuel cage. The cages themselves are almost identical except for the fuel lines. The connector, mounting points, etc all swap directly across. To mount the WRX fuel pump, I just had to use the WRX fuel pump seat instead of the thicker L one. If you don't have access to this piece, all you should have to do is place an order down at your local Subaru parts department. I think that would be the only thing preventing the WRX fuel pump from being a direct drop-in replacement. I just swapped the fuel temp sensor, fuel pump, fuel pump seat, and fuel level sensor over to my L cage.

*more to follow*

Last edited by stimpy; 01-08-2004 at 03:39 PM.
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Old 01-08-2004, 04:10 PM   #3
stimpy
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Join Date: Jun 2000
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Vehicle:
2008 STI

Default Installation quirks

There are a few quirks to work out currently. The car is, without a doubt, very driveable and VERY fast; ghetto rigged or not.

As was said previously, the L fans will not mount up to the WRX radiator. I am currently running the car without radiator fans. I do not recommend doing this unless you know what the rammifications of doing so will be. The fan motors on the WRX fans should be compatible with the L wiring harness once the L plugs are soldered in to place. Since the radiator fans are absent, the mounting point for the radiator overflow is also missing. Because of this, I just have my coolant overflow tank sitting on the passenger side of the radiator.

Swapping for the WRX radiator has also left me without a hook to catch my hood prop rod while the hood is down. It is currently just wedged down on top of the radiator.

While installing the WRX fuel level sensor, it seemed to hit the anti-slosh tray in the bottom of the tank, but I thought nothing of it. Today I noticed my fuel level sensor stopped dropping once it got just below a quarter of a tank. In all honestly, I can't say that I have been paying enough attention to know if it was moving properly or not, but my fuel level seems weird. I had about six gallons of gas added to my tank and my fuel level was somewhere above a quarter of a tank. I had since driven about 50 miles including some hard acceleration runs and it was only just below a quarter. This morning I added in about 8 gallons of gas and my fuel level is only just above 1/2 tank which tells me something is off. Eight gallons should only put it up to 1/2 tank if the tank was bone dry or if the fuel level sensor is misreporting how full it really is. I'll probably be swapping my L fuel level sensor back over later to see if it rectifies the situation.

My check engine light is currently on. However, I was expecting it. The 2003 WRX added a new fuel tank sensor to the fuel tank and wiring harness. This sensor was not present on my 1999 Forester tank nor did I have the wire for it in my 2002 WRX wiring harness. Because of this, I am unable to splice a signal into the ECU and give the ECU what it wants. I am also temporarily missing the purge control valve (or duty solenoid [same as the wastegate duty solenoid] as per the Subaru parts department). I knew I was missing two sensor signals when the installation went in and, sure enough, after the car was running there were two DTCs; both corresponding to the missing sensors. As soon as I get those sensor signals going, my MIL will go off .

The gauge cluster is almost completely compatible with my WRX swap. I say almost because my water temperature gauge pegs once it is warmed up. This seems to be a voltage scaling issue. There are no sensor specs within the FSM so I do not know what will become of this. I tapped this signal clear under the middle of the dash so if I do come across a solution, it will require a dash removal to implement. The mechanical cluster and the ECU which normally works with an electronic VSS are just fine as the mechanical cluster generates the needed electronic VSS signal. I did have a brief problem where my speedometer stopped working. Fortunately, it was just the cable slipping off the gauge cluster. I did notice that the FSM has an incredible troubleshooting section. Right before I found out the cable was no longer attached, I had printed out a comprehensive flow chart indicating how to isolate the problem.

My airbag light is on currently. Problem is, nothing I did should have triggered that save for removing the dash. I'm trying to fight this and I hope to have it figured out soon. I'll be using the flow chart for airbag light troubleshooting to resolve. It should not pose as a problem for most, though.

While filling up my gas tank this morning, I found out that our creative engineering on the gas tank hoses was insufficient. I saw that there is a hose (hoses?) that help allow the displaced air to return above the fuel filler neck? Apparantly we missed the boat because my car would only take gas at a very slow rate. I'll have to reanalyze the hoses but this poses as a difficult problem since the FSM does not give a very good routing of the hoses, just explosion diagrams.

I found out that the WRX power steering pump uses a completely different hose routing system than previous years. This requires a remotely located fluid reservoir and different power steering lines. I had the reservoir, but not the hard lines. The car had to be up and running and, when the power steering lines I ordered actually turned out to be the reservoir hoses, I had to make some decisions. I decided I was going to drive it without powersteering and then stopped thinking about it until after my first test drive. The problem with that is the powersteering pump is lubricated by the powersteering fluid. With no fluid, it overheated and has surely damaged the internals. I now have to order a new powersteering pump and the hardlines before I have powersteering once again. The car gets nasty and takes two hands on the wheel to keep it straight when under hard acceleration.

Finally, my car is not all together yet. Besides the above mentioned items, I also do not have the turbo heatshield trimmed to fit my downpipe, the passenger side IC bracket is not in so my IC sits slanting down towards the passenger side, I have my power steering pump completely bypassed using a 27", 4 ribbed belt (270K4), and only half my interior is in place since wires must still be routed.

*wiring comes next*
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Old 01-08-2004, 05:41 PM   #4
stimpy
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Vehicle:
2008 STI

Default Wiring notes

*DISCLAIMER*
I can make no guarantee that if you follow these steps, your car will start up without issue. These are the steps that applied to my car and while my mind is sharp, I spent so much time working with wires and changing my mind, I may have overlooked some things


I'm not quite sure how specific I can get with this, but I'm going to try and cover the basic ideas and procedures I used for wiring my car.

You absolutely need to have the wiring and ECU I/O diagrams for this portion of the installation. The wiring diagrams are going to consist of harness locations, connector locations, and system wiring diagrams. You will need the diagrams for both cars, so don't skimp. These diagrams can be sourced from your local Subaru dealer, http://techinfo.subaru.com, or one that I haven't used nor did I need: http://www.alldata.com.

First of all, you are going to want to lay out the entire harness as though it were sitting in the car. This must be done so you can identify specific connectors. With a hard copy of your harness locations, you can set to eliminating what you don't need. I printed all my wiring diagrams, organized them by page number for each year, and then placed them all in a binder to keep organized. Keep a pencil, pen, and masking tape on hand and don't be afraid to get a second opinion about what you are cutting out.

The diagrams themselves will list connectors as alphanumeric such as B73, i13, e20, T1, etc. Each letter indicates a certain location of that connector. 'B' is bulkhead, 'i' is instrument cluster, 'e' is engine, 'T' is transmission, and so on and so forth. The later portion of the identifier is a number unique to the location. If you write down B137, this is the only connector in the entire car with that identification. This nomenclature is documented in the beginning of the wiring diagrams.

Most connectors will be clearly identified and will indicate to you what it's purpose is. For example, connector B3 on a 2002/2003 WRX is the 'Mass Airflow sensor' (you need this one). B5 is 'Resistor (Daytime running light)' (you don't need this one).

*Note: Do not take this list as a conclusive and finite list. There may be things that I have forgotten or simply neglected to list. If a list is given, do NOT assume that is ALL.

Your job, at this point, is to identify the connectors that, without a doubt, are not needed. Items worthy of deletion are things like airbags, lighting, abs, doors cords; basically, anything that is not relating to the ECU, engine, or gauge cluster. Once you locate a connector that will definitely not be needed, you can cut it out from the WRX harness. I stripped all the tape, loom, and protection off the wires, clipped the connector, then removed the wires tracing all the way back to another connector, relay, or fuse box. If it is a wire that will be tapped into at the ECU side, leave yourself plenty of extra wire. Examples of this would be the starter wire, VSS, engine speed output, radiator fans etc (I'll give a list of everything I tapped later).

*Note: At this point, do not remove ANYTHING that goes from the ECU/engine functions and traces back to the fuse/relay boxes. Removing things like the alternator cord, ABS, airbags and whatnot that trace back to the fuse/relay boxes are ok. We want to leave these power wires intact because they will be wires we need to tap into the existing chassis harness for power.

*Note: Do not remove the grounds in the WRX harness. It would be to your best interest to keep the grounds and utilize them once the harness is in the car.

Keep in mind that any wires coming from the engine and not immediately going to the ECU may still be needed. Those things include items like the reverse switch (for backup lights), oil pressure, and thermometer (others will probably apply here).

Once you have eliminated the extra, uneeded wires, go ahead and wrap up the wires with a strip of black tape at 1.5 foot increments. The purpose of this is to keep the wires together and keep it tidy. This helps for organization, keeping your sanity, and to help you see progress (you will need this part).

After this is done, you may be left with a couple connectors that are questionable, the ECU plugs, possibly some fuel tank plugs (depending upon year of car), the engine wiring harness plugs, the instrument cluster plugs, the main relay/fuse box, the SMJ (super multiple junction) and the interior relay/fuse box.

*Note: I used the WRX transmission harness since I am using a WRX transmission. Some of these wires will not be needed where others will be needed depending upon the year of your car and the transmission used.

Now lets take care of the instrument cluster. Most people will choose to use the existing instrument cluster. If this is the case, then only a few wires are needed out of these connectors. For simplicity's sake, I chose to make these connections back at either the ECU or the SMJ and avoid soldering at the instrument cluster plugs. For my car, I needed to tap the following wires for the instrument cluster:
  • Oil pressure warning light
  • Malfunction Indicator light
  • Tachometer
  • Vehicle speed sensor (needed if it is a mechanical gauge cluster)
  • Fuel gauge
  • Temperature gauge

The part I put off util the last, and the part gave me the most headaches, was the power supply for the engine management harness. This part was drastically different between the two chassis and it took a second mind to realize how to do it. I originally was going to utilize the main relay from my chassis, however, as it turns out, the main relay is only used for the engine management portion of the car. As such, you can use the main relay from the WRX harness and save yourself a bunch of time and a bunch of soldering. Since I was using all new stuff for the fuel tank, I also chose to use the fuel pump relay from the WRX harness.

To finish the seperation and realize a true, standalone WRX engine management harness, you need to reference the 'Engine Electical System' pages for the WRX. With this laid out in front of you, start on page 1 and locate every wire that goes to the power supply. Label these and trim them as close to the power supply as you can get. This should leave you with about 5 or 6 wires attaching the engine management harness to the power supply stuff. Go through and identify each of the remaining wires. Most of them, if I remember correctly, are needed. Label them and cut them from the power supply. You should now have a standalone engine management harness to run you swap with the factory ECU.

The next step is to identify where to tap the remaining wires so your new harness can be merged into your existing chassis harness. To do this you must compare the 'Engine Electical System' pages for both your new engine and your old chassis. Mate them up and identify where/how they will be tapped.

For the instrument cluster, the oil pressure switch and thermometer were tapped at the SMJ. The MIL, engine output speed, and VSS were tapped at the ECU. The Fuel gauge was tapped clear back at the old fuel tank cord connector.

Most of my power wires were tapped at a bulkhead connector that previously fed the old ECU.

The wires I tapped at the ECU are as follows:
  • Vehicle speed signal
  • Starter switch
  • Ignition switch
  • Neutral position switch
  • Backup power supply
  • Control unit power supply
  • Radiator fan relay 1 control
  • Radiator fan relay 2 control
  • Malfunction indicator lamp
  • Engine speed output

*Note: A/C connections have been excluded from this list since A/C was removed from my car. There are additonal wires to deal with in order to retain A/C.

The newer cars will have additional items that must be tapped at the Check connector or the OBD-II connector. My car only required a ground to be tapped at the OBD-II connector and a power wire to be tapped at the Check connector.

Here is a comprehensive list of every wire I had to tap, whether it be an input or an output:
  • Oil pressure warning light
  • Malfunction Indicator light
  • Tachometer
  • Vehicle speed sensor (needed if it is a mechanical gauge cluster)
  • Fuel gauge
  • Temperature gauge
  • Starter switch
  • Ignition switch
  • Neutral position switch
  • Backup power supply
  • Control unit power supply
  • Radiator fan relay 1 control
  • Radiator fan relay 2 control
  • Malfunction indicator lamp
  • Engine speed output
  • Reverse position switch signal
  • Reverse position switch power
  • Ignition coil power
  • Fuel pump relay power
  • Fuel pump relay secondary power
  • Main relay power
  • Check connector power
  • OBD-II ground

*more to follow*

Last edited by stimpy; 01-09-2004 at 05:10 PM.
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Old 01-09-2004, 05:48 PM   #5
stimpy
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2008 STI

Default Startup notes

To finish my installation summary, I'm going to highlight some finer points of getting the engine started once it is physically in and wired up.

You need to do a pre-startup checklist. Items to note are fuel in the tank, fresh oil and oil filter, coolant in the radiator, all coolant lines are hooked up, fuel lines are hooked up, battery is in and charged, no tools left in places to mulch, etc. Once you have gone through your checklist, ask somebody else to inspect your work and ask questions. There is a good chance you forgot something .

Now for the fun part. Turn your key to the ignition position but DO NOT TRY TO START. With this, your lights should come up on your dash, you should have the 'Check Engine' light on, you should hear your fuel pump and main relay click, and the fuel pump should kick on. My car didn't have the relays clicking or the 'Check Engine' light on. Turns out, in our haste to tap the final wire, we plugged it into the wrong wire in the connector and had no power to the relays.

*Note: If you have left your interior a lot of the way out and your wires all over the place, you can easily rectify any wire mishap. Ours was a simply movement of a pin on a connector. Just don't leave any connector unplugged that should be plugged in.

If you plug your OBD-II reader into your OBD-II port, you should get a connection to your ECU.

At this time, you should walk around the car and look for leaks since your fuel system should be pressurized.

There is a good chance the engine has been sitting for an extended period of time, possibly without oil. First thing you should have on your mind before starting, then, is that you need to somehow prime it. If the engine is fresh (doubtful) then it will already have assembly lube in it to help ease this first, dry start. If not, you are going to need to prime the engine. Any OBD-II system (and possibly others) will shut off fuel when the throttle position sensor reports 100%. When this is done, the engine is only going to run as fast as the starter will turn it. So what you want to do is dry crank it with either your coil plugs unhooked or with the throttle wide open. This will get the oil flowing throughout the engine. For a more detailed description of this, please do a search as I am no expert on the matter. Once your engine is primed, go ahead and let up off the gas and turn it over.

You will find that the engine is going to just turn over and over and over. My fuel system was completely dry so the air bubbles had to work themselves out of the system. There is probably a proper way of taking care of this. An indication of this problem is when you turn your key to ignition, you can hear bubbles in the fuel tank. Just be patient and keep trying. My car finally caught and began idling; albeit very poorly. My dad, who was watching the whole thing, suggested that while starting it sounded like it wasn't running on all cylinders.

When I disassembled my engine in the basement, I took the ignition coil wires off and, upon reassembly, I remembered noting that they were opposite of what I expected. As soon as I did a little research I found out that I had the ignition coil wires for cylinder 1 and 3 reversed. The car started right up after this was resolved.

If you are miffed by why your car is not starting, there is a very good section in the FSMs that detail a whole slew of problems regarding starting failure. Your best bet, after bouncing an idea or two of your friends, peers, or whatever, is to start in to this flowchart.

Check for leaks again once it's running. Once it has come up to operating temperature, your thermostat will open and you will probably be low on coolant.

At this point, you probably have a 'Check Engine' light on. Pull your DTCs and see if they are expected or if you need to take care of them.

Go ahead and take a small test drive and make sure everything sounds normal and feels like it is operating correctly. Once it has jumped through all those hoops, you can go ahead and get on the gas some more and start working out your aggression.

After all bugs have been worked out of your wiring, finish wrapping your wires to bring them up to the factory look, hide them, and put your interior back together.

-Jon
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Old 01-10-2004, 02:58 AM   #6
MZM
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Good job well done. You realize of course this is the beginning and not the end!

And thanks for the grill.

Mike McBride
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Old 01-10-2004, 05:04 AM   #7
spiralsmurf
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do i need to tap the VSS on my RS?
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Old 01-10-2004, 01:07 PM   #8
liberty2000rs
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Default nnnnnnnnice

Jon,
You should make this a sticky..................................
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Old 01-10-2004, 01:59 PM   #9
AndyM
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Thumbs up Great Job

This is clearly the best write up, and good source I have ever read on this board. Incredible job!
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Old 01-10-2004, 08:07 PM   #10
stimpy
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Yes, you need to tap the VSS. The WRX ECU expects a VSS and you need to give it one. If that wire is not tapped, you will be stuck in safe mode with no boost and a rev limit of 4500rpm.

-Jon
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Old 01-10-2004, 08:17 PM   #11
spiked
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it sounds like you done a lot of hard work..i have a friend thats doing the same swap into his impreza too. but he can't find a diagram of the ecu pin outs. where did you find the information you needed?

thanx
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Old 01-10-2004, 08:21 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally posted by stimpy
You absolutely need to have the wiring and ECU I/O diagrams for this portion of the installation. The wiring diagrams are going to consist of harness locations, connector locations, and system wiring diagrams. You will need the diagrams for both cars, so don't skimp. These diagrams can be sourced from your local Subaru dealer, http://techinfo.subaru.com, or one that I haven't used nor did I need: http://www.alldata.com.
Please read the FAQ and all of this post.

-Jon
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Old 01-11-2004, 11:32 AM   #13
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Quote:
The gauge cluster is almost completely compatible with my WRX swap. I say almost because my water temperature gauge pegs once it is warmed up. This seems to be a voltage scaling issue. There are no sensor specs within the FSM so I do not know what will become of this. I tapped this signal clear under the middle of the dash so if I do come across a solution, it will require a dash removal to implement. The mechanical cluster and the ECU which normally works with an electronic VSS are just fine as the mechanical cluster generates the needed electronic VSS signal. I did have a brief problem where my speedometer stopped working. Fortunately, it was just the cable slipping off the gauge cluster. I did notice that the FSM has an incredible troubleshooting section. Right before I found out the cable was no longer attached, I had printed out a comprehensive flow chart indicating how to isolate the problem.
Have you put fans on the car yet??
it's probably pegging because you don't have fans on the car.

Also do you have you scan port connected?

Imprezd~
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Old 01-11-2004, 01:07 PM   #14
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The fans will go in next week. I'll post once I get the in.

The scan port is connected; why do you ask? Ah yes, you can monitor coolant temp in there. Last I checked, it was 180 degrees Farenheit, but I don't remember how long the car had been running or anything.

-Jon
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Old 01-12-2004, 03:05 PM   #15
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I'd check it after it's been runing for awhile... I am pretty sure it won't rest at 180 degrees let me know how you make out.

Sounds scary to me.

Imprezd~
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Old 01-12-2004, 04:16 PM   #16
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176 degrees is where it was after driving to work today. Ambient temp was 18 degrees.

-Jon
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Old 01-12-2004, 04:18 PM   #17
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good to hear... I just wouldn't let it idle for too long...




Imprezd~
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Old 01-14-2004, 04:35 PM   #18
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So, jon...looking for another swap to do

Do you have picts of your car? I would love to come see it sometime.

GL
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Old 01-14-2004, 09:23 PM   #19
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That is a LOT of work
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Old 01-15-2004, 09:22 PM   #20
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Jon,
Nice work and great write up. You have definitely taken your credentials as moderator of this forum to the next level. I too suggest this be stickied...

I look forward to checking out your work in person at the Cobb meet in May...
-MM
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Old 01-19-2004, 03:23 PM   #21
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Pictures will be available once it stops being really crappy weather and I have some time during the mid-day to wash the car. If there is any aspect of the swap you would like pictures of, please feel free to ask.

-Jon
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Old 01-19-2004, 03:49 PM   #22
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I've got some more time in on some of my hackjobs and problems.

I initially thought that the thermometer signal on the WRX had been changed from previous years, thus causing my seemingly multiplied and accelerated temperature gauge behavior. It turns out the temperature gauge has two wires coming off of it (I was aware of this). But, what I overlooked, was that this other signal wire, one that does not come from the engine, is actually a ground. This particular wire goes from the gauge cluster, through the BWH, through the firewall, and finally terminates with a grounding terminal on the engine. I pulled that half of the wiring so this ground was just dead in a connector. I added the other half of the terminal into the connector then soldered it into the ground system. What do you know, it works great now!

I finally figured out why my airbag light was on. The airbag connectors have a double locking feature designed to prevent accidental disengagement. One of those is your standard tab lock. The other is a green tab that pushes over and locks the tab into place (called the double lock). To disengage, you have to pry the green tab up and release. Then you are free to press in the tab and disconnect. It turns out that the ABS system has some sort of closed ciruit attached to the green, double lock system. If the double lock is not fully engaged (pressed all the way in using the push button), then the circuit is open and you will get an error code 14.

I did manage to figure out what was going on with the fuel level sensor. Aside from the different fuel line fittings on the top of the fuel cage, the fuel level sensor is also in a slightly different, and lower position on the WRX cage. They changed the size of the anti-slosh tray inside the Forester tank and so this lower position conflicts with the tray itself. There may be even more differences, though, since I was comparing a WRX cage and an L cage, rather than a Forester cage. In any case, I had to completely rebend the fuel level float arm so that it would clear this tray and still report the levels. What I have ended up with seems to work well and my fuel level goes all the way down to empty. I'll have to check once I finish this tank, but I think I will still have a few gallons left even though it says empty.

The evap system appears to be why my fuel fill is so slow. It is my assumption that the drain valve is used to purge off the excess pressure/air created from filling the tank. This hose passes from the tank over to the charcoal canister, then into the evap system as well as the open air (after a filter, of course). However, I just have the drain valve venting back into the evap system. This produces close to a closed system which does not breathe well. I looked at a newer Subaru and found out that I'm missing a bracket for mounting the charcoal canister. I'll hunt that down, then install the remaining parts of the evap system and this should be resolved.

Lastly, I got my radiator fans into the car. I know guys complained about how tight their stock radiator and fans were, but they haven't seen tight until they put fans on a PWR radiator inside a GFA. Nonetheless, after some massaging with my hacksaw, drill, and tin snips, I got them to fit. I ended up removing some material from the top of the passenger side heatshield, removing the lower, driver's side support brace of the passenger's side fan to clear the coolant line going to the oil cooler, and redrilling the base locating hole for the coolant overflow tank. There are two things that are of some concern with this. First of all, the upper radiator hose, if pressed down, will contact the fan. If just left alone, I don't think it would ever get down there; especially if the radiator hose were pressurized. My solution to that was to use a wide ziptie and pull it up and back away from the fan and the engine. The other situation is how close the coolant overflow tank sits to the driver's side timing belt cover. I have approximately 1/8" between the two. There is some flex, so it will probably be ok if they do contact for some unknown reason.

-Jon
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Old 01-20-2004, 10:46 PM   #23
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Stickified!

props on the right up.

Jay
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Old 02-02-2004, 07:33 PM   #24
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I am thinking about doing a wrx swap as well and i found your write up very helpfull.

Just wondering about how much you had to spend. any kind of ballpark figure would be good. I'm just starting to add up the cost of things and i'm shure i'm leaving some numbers out.


Thanks
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Old 02-02-2004, 11:25 PM   #25
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I'll post the pricesheet tomorrow.

-Jon
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