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Old 02-08-2005, 08:34 PM   #1
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Default Amplifier Buyer's Guide and FAQ

Amplifier Buyer's Guide and FAQ


Preface -
This guide is a very basic attempt to helping a new car audio consumer understand the dizzying amount of choices and terminology associated with car audio amplifiers. As with so much of car audio a lot of this information is somewhat subjective and opinionated. But this is an attempt to give enough generalized information to help a person make a good purchasing decision. This FAQ may be a little long winded and simplistic in places, feel free to skip around sections you are comfortable with. There is still tons of information beyond this that may prove useful as well, so again this is only a brief introduction into car audio amplifiers.


Amplifier Needs -
An explanation as to the benefit of an amplifier as a component of a car audio system may be a good place to start. An amplifier may seem to some people as a component primarily for making things louder. While there is plenty of truth that an amplifier is used to increase sound levels, it is really more about increasing the electrical signal from an audio device (such as a radio) to the point of creating a signal capable of moving a speaker's cone to the point of causing vibrations in the ear that will be converted back to electrical signals traveling to the brain. Now here is the importance of an amplifier in that scenario... to control a speaker, the original signal most be amplified with enough power to cause the speaker cone to appropriately reproduce the sound waves. First and foremost this means an amplifier can have a direct effect on the quality of sound and not just the quantity. A metaphor to help understand this is a light bulb used to view a painting. While a low amount of light allows a person to see the picture, it isn't until there is sufficient light to see the detail and beauty involved.

Most car stereos have built-in amplification. This amplification is only vaguely similar to an external amplifier, but is sorely lacking the real ability in terms of power. There is a reason that an amplifier rated at 35 watts per channel is considerable larger than a radio which claims to include 35 watts per channel as well. There are problems throughout the car audio industry in the way ratings are calculated. And for a lot of companies, they prefer to use methods of power ratings to claim they make more power than their competition. There has been work put into an organization for the methods used, but there is still some concern with the way power ratings are advertised.


Amplifier Classes -
Amplifier classification is a consideration for potentially both sound quality and impact on your vehicle's charging system. The concept for amplifier classification is a general guideline for the electronics construction of the amplifier. I won't get into the technology of what different components go into different classes of amps, but I will try and rationalize the impact of their differences. There are currently two extremely common amplifier classes for car audio amplifiers, A/B and D; and two other less common classes, A and T. In alphabetical order this will discuss the reasoning behind the various classifications.
Class A - Generally regarded as the best class in terms of sound quality, but also the worst in terms of power required from your vehicle and of heat output. Given the high demands and excessive heat class A is rare in car audio.
Class A/B - A thoughtful way of combining the qualities of two different amplifier classes. This is by far the most common class of car audio amplifier. The design retains to a large extent the sound quality of class A designs while eliminating much of the heat and inefficiency. (*NOTE - Class B amplification is inappropriate on its own for amplification of audio and therefore only certain concepts were used to combine with class A to form class A/B.)
Class D - A highly efficient design that yields good sound quality and less heat; however the sound quality is only usable at a certain lower frequency range. It is for this reason that class D amplifiers are marketed primarily for subwoofers. Some car audio enthusiasts who are most concerned with SQ feel there is a definite difference between class A/B and class D amplifiers used for subwoofers; however for the vast majority the difference in sound quality is not noticeable and well worth the tradeoff for less heat and drain on the vehicle's charging system.
Class T - A design that is somewhat similar to class D, but uses some thoughtful tricks to improve sound quality throughout the entire audible range. As of this time, the costs associated to build a class T amplifier with lesser sound quality versus a class A/B amplifiers make this very rare. Typically the downsides of class A/B are not severe enough to cause the need for a higher-priced, lesser sound quality class T amplifier.


Channel Configuration -
There are many different configurations for amplifiers; usually referred to as multi-channel (anything more than two channels), 2-channel, or mono amps. What is a channel? In a very basic sense, it is a single power source for a single load. So for instance it is common to use a 2-channel amp to power a pair of speakers. One channel is marked as the left channel and one as the right, which is how we get sound in stereo. That doesn't mean that you couldn't wire up more than speaker to a channel though. When using a 2-channel amp for a component set (like a 6.5 inch midbass and tweeter), the concept is still for a left and right channel, but each channel is now powering two speakers. That isn't to say that you can just hook up several speakers to a single channel without problems. You have to take into consideration changes in the ohm load the amplifier sees and also remember that each speaker would be sharing the total power of that channel so they wouldn't all be getting the maximum power that channel is capable of. There is more info on understanding ohm loads and speaker configurations in my Subwoofer FAQ & Buyer's Guide here
http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/showthread.php?t=618889

Also, most amps are capable of bridging channels. This is in simple terms taking two channels and combining them to power one load. So if you buy a 4-channel amp, you can bridge the left two channels for the left speaker and the right two channels for the right speaker (sometimes it is the front pair and rear pair used together) and it will *roughly* quadruple the amount of power the left and right speaker would have seen from using just one channel on each. Another rarely used configuration is to use a 2-channel amp and run each channel to its own speakers AND at the same time run another speaker off of both channels in a bridged type of configuration. This is typically called Tri-channel mode and is not normally a preferred way of setting up a system though and is best avoided if possible. What is common practice, and not too bad of an idea in some situations is to use a 4-channel amp in a 3-channel mode. This is where two of the channels are used for the front speakers and the other two channels are bridged for a subwoofer setup.


Amplifier Input -
Getting the signal into the amplifier can happen a couple of different ways. This usually comes down to whether or not the source signal is coming from a factory head unit or an aftermarket one. An aftermarket HU usually has a certain number of RCA outputs. This makes things very easy; simply use an RCA cable to go from the HU to the RCA inputs on the amplifier. If however you are trying to use the stock HU, there are no RCA outputs to use. In that case there are a couple options. One is that an amplifier can have 'speaker level' inputs. This allows you to take the wire that is currently running from the HU to the speaker and connect it to the amp. This is typically an easy way of doing things, but usually the sound quality suffers. Also there are fewer amps with speaker level inputs; the ones that do have them are commonly lower end amps also. If the amp does not have speaker level inputs, or you would prefer to try increasing the sound quality of the system, there is a device that can take the signal from the speaker wires and convert it to an RCA output (which you would then run RCA cables from that device to the amplifier). That device is called a Line-out Converter, or just LOC; and is basically doing the same thing as a the speaker level inputs on an amps but does a much better job at it. If looking to buy an LOC try www.DavidNavone.com as those are some of the best made (especially for the price). For more info on LOCs go to www.BCAE1.com section 125. Line-out Converters.


THD and S/N -
Technology has been advancing at an exponential rate in the last decade, and audio equipment hasn't been left in the dust. Many years ago, specs like Total Harmonic Distortion (THD) and Signal-to-Noise ratio (S/N) were very important. They told the user how well the amplifier could amplify the sound signal, while keeping noise and other types of distortion out. However, with all the advancements in technology in recent years, amp manufacturers have been able to push the S/N so high and THD so low that they've become pretty much useless. In higher frequencies humans can't hear distortion levels less than around 1%, and at low frequencies this threshold rises closer to 10%. This means that if you find two amps that have .01% THD and .03% THD respectfully, both of them are so low that it would be absolutely impossible to hear a difference in these amps based on THD alone (there might be other audible difference, but they won't be attributed to THD). Add in the fact that the speakers themselves have THD levels that approach 5-10%, amp manufacturers rate THD specs differently, and we're dealing with cars that have 60+ dB of background noise as soon as you start them, and you can see why comparing 2 amps based solely on a THD difference of .02% is just stupid.


Power Ratings -
The ratings of amplifiers can be very confusing for people new to car audio. Commonly amps are rated by a certain number of Watts they are able to produce per channel. Often the manufacturer will show a change in power based on the load the amplifier is capable of running at. What isn't as common is for the manufacturer to point out what Voltage the testing was done at or how much distortion was allowed. Trying to keep this simple, the charging systems in cars actually vary how much voltage they are sending; and the more voltage, the more power an amplifier can typically make. However some amplifiers are designed to produce the same amount of power at any voltage, such as JL Audio and Phoenix Gold. These differences are created by using either regulated (always the same power) or unregulated (power varies with available voltage) power supplies.

There are also both RMS ratings and MAX ratings. RMS stands for Root Mean Square. But don't let that confuse you; what it really means is the average power available. On the other end of things is the MAX rating, which is just short for maximum. The more important numbers to pay attention to are the RMS ratings because the MAX ratings can often be misleading, and many times they're just blatant lies. Some manufacturers are now including Dynamic Power as a rating as well.

Cutting through the marketing of big numbers is tough. There is a standards group who has started trying to make thing, well, more standard. This standard is known as CEA-2006 and below is a link discussing it
http://www.ce.org/standards/Standard...s.aspx?Id=1455


Power Requirements -
In continuing the discussion on power ratings, the important concept in choosing an amplifier is finding one that matches the requirements needed by what it will be powering. Usually a amplifier should be rated to put out approximately the same amount of power that a speaker is rated to handle. And it is typically better to match them based on the RMS ratings as mentioned before. The biggest problem with not supplying enough power to a speaker is that people commonly try to make up for the lack of output by turning the volume or gains up too high. Incorrect gains can cause clipping to occur, and clipping can cause blown speakers. For more information on clipping try reading www.BCAE1.com section 29. Too Little Power.

There is some thought given to increasing the power beyond what the speaker requires though. This leads to a discussion between of headroom versus overpowering. The best summary of this topic can be found here at the link below
http://www.edesignaudio.com/kayako/u...al%20Documents
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Old 02-08-2005, 08:34 PM   #2
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Vehicle Charging System -
The vehicle charging system is what provides electrical power to everything; including all of the car audio equipment and most importantly the amplifier. There is a ton of technical detail I am not going to try and go into here, but the important point to consider is that there is a limited amount of power available for using car audio amplifiers (for more information on the vehicle charging system go to www.BCAE1.com section 42. Charging System Basics). Trying to push 3000 Watts of power isn't a good idea with everything else stock. Even moderate amounts of extra drain from the system from any amplifier can cause a shortened lifespan of both the alternator and battery. There are some options for improving the charging system though.

One is upgrading the battery. This is mostly for people who like to play their system without the engine running. If you are cranking the music with the engine off, all of the power is being drained from the battery. The stock batteries are unhappy with having this done too much. A deep-cycle battery holds up much better to repeated draining. The most common choice for deep-cycle batteries is Optima; specifically the Yellow Top series. The Red Top series is a step down in terms of ability to be deep-cycled, however it is a little better at cranking. Some people feel that Optima batteries are overpriced and prefer others such as Orbital batteries. My preferred on-line vendor for Optima batteries is www.RemyBattery.com whose shipped prices are still cheaper than most local stores shelf price. The correct size to keep things standard would be the "Group 35" batteries.

For alternators, there are a couple of choices. Either replace your alternator with one that has higher output, or have the stock alternator rebuilt for higher output (typically referred to as having it "rewound"). One direct method for WRX owners to buy a new HO alternator is
http://www.2kracing.com/product_info...oducts_id/2650
Two other places that have consistently done good work are
http://www.mechman.com/home.html
http://www.ohiogen.com/
A third option for replacing the alternator along with a lengthy discussion on this topic can be seen here
http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/showthread.php?t=583790

Discussion on upgrades of the "Big 3" or grounding kits in regards to car audio should be mentioned now. There are definitely benefits gained at times when doing this. And with any sort of high power audio system, a car's charging system can use all the help it can get. I am not claiming a gain of 10HP or anything, but it can possibly help quite a bit with dimming headlights and keeping your charging system healthy longer. If you a are made of money feel free to buy a grounding kit from someone like Lineage; otherwise I would suggest just searching around and doing it DIY style. There are plenty of threads on NASIOC and over at Scoobymods.com that cover the materials and how to do it. Just remember that there are the three critical connection points that make the biggest difference (explaining the name of the "Big 3" or "Magic 3"). First is the Battery negative to chassis. Next is the alternator to battery positive. And last is the chassis to engine. Below are links to some Big 3/grounding mod examples...
http://forum.sounddomain.com/forum/u...=5;t=007801;p=
http://www.scoobymods.com/forums/sho...?threadid=2002

Two more quick notes for this section. The first is that capacitors are not the correct fix for dimming lights. Furthermore less than five percent of any aftermarket car audio system has any need for a capacitor. They can actually wind up being detrimental because they just become another load for the alternator to keep charged. Not to say they are never necessary, just that if you aren't highly knowledgeable in car audio you probably shouldn't consider one. The other comment is that the use of an underdrive pulley can cause severe problems with the vehicle's charging system. An underdrive pulley and a high power car audio system is a bad combination that should be avoided.


Mounting Considerations -
Choosing a mounting location for an amplifier can sometimes be difficult. A lot of people prefer to mount them under one of the front seats. This saves on the length of RCA's needed (saving money) and keeps them out of the way of throwing things into the trunk. But usually size dictates that an amp won't fit under either of the front seats. The other typical spot, the trunk, is a good location as it keeps the amps away from the kicking feet of back seat passengers. Sometimes an amp being in the trunk also actually makes it easier to get to when trying to tweak something like the gain or crossover settings. When mounting in the trunk, the things to consider are how you actually go about 'mounting' it. I have seen people simply lay the amp in the trunk and connect the wiring. This is a bad idea as it can slide around, pull wires, and potentially cause a fire. The biggest concern though is to avoid simply shooting screws straight down into the trunk floor. The gas tank sits under part of the trunk and is very close to the trunk flooring. Even a one inch screw could puncture the gas tank in some spots.

Whatever location is decided upon, make sure that there is enough air around the amp for the heat to dissipate. One of the downsides against putting an amp under one of the front seats is that it may not have enough room 'to breathe'. Or if sinking the amp into a false floor or the tire well, make sure that air can circulate enough to keep the amp cool. Sometimes fans are used to help draw air across the heatsink of the amp and keep things from overheating. Fans are very common in a false floor setup as well, blowing the air from the mounting location into the rest of the trunk.

Another small note is that mounting an amplifier on a subwoofer enclosure may be a bad idea. This has been argued over for a while, but the safe bet is to avoid it if possible. For more explanation on why that is a bad idea go to www.BCAE1.com section 23. Amplifiers and about half way down is a section titled Amplifier mounting.


Gain Settings -
This is another topic where it is easier to defer to more informational pages. I will however try to give a very rudimentary summary though; I will try to explain the purpose for gain settings. Basically when dealing with RCA inputs on amplifiers, the amp has to be flexible in how much power it is expecting to get through the RCAs from the head unit. Different head units can supply different amounts of voltage. The most common amount now for mid-level quality decks is four volts. Since the input voltage varies in different situations amplifiers have a gain adjustment that is used to 'match' what the head unit is sending with what the amplifier is expecting. For more info on how gains actually work go to www.BCAE1.com section 63. Gain Controls.

Some people make the mistake of using the gain as a volume knob, thinking that 50% gain means 50% power and 100% gain means 100% power. The problem is that in doing so is there is a very good chance they will actually go beyond the amp's capabilities and force it into clipping, as was discussed above in the section "Power Requirements". I can't emphasize enough how bad clipping can be, it is easily the #1 cause of blown speakers and is also a leading cause of blown amps. Also keep in mind that even with properly set gains, using a bass boost or similar feature will greatly increase the chance of clipping. The best idea is to leave all bass boosts off, they are actually detrimental to sound quality and increase the chance of blowing your speakers. Below are some links that show the proper ways to adjust the gain settings so things work correctly
http://www.jlaudio.com/tutorials/Inp...nsitivity.html
http://forum.sounddomain.com/ubb/ult...c;f=2;t=030419



Amplifier brands -
Most manufacturers have various lines of equipment, and these categorizations are based on overall offerings (the low-end of a line might still not be worth buying even though the mid or upper models are good quality; while some companies top tier model is the only item of exceptional quality). Elite brands are typically thought to be an amplifier whose price puts it beyond the accessibility of the general car audio consumer. Quality brands are for those people who are willing to spend the money to get an above average audio system that will be of good quality and reliability. Value brands are for people who want something superior to most all OEM systems, but are limited by budget (best bang for the buck). Those amps listed as Poor are a brand with known reliability or quality problems.

I can't emphasize enough how rough this generalization is, and that it just attempts to throw out names and let people have some rough idea what the GENERAL feelings are toward a brand of amplifier. There are some cases where as a brand they are significantly toward the top or bottom of the category they have been placed into as well. For example, the JL "slash" series are on the high end of quality and on the high end of the pricing for that category; while Alpine amps are usually ultra reliable and cheaper than some of the other offerings, but the SQ is questioned by those who prefer upper quality or Elite level amps. The worst part is that there really are issues between the Elite and Quality level amps where they blend together, but again this perspective is based on an average for all lines made by that manufacturer. There are also situations where a brand such as Lanzar has a really poor line like the Vibe but the old Opti line is decent quality for the money.

Also, these opinions are limited to the current lines. Some things change drastically over time (a lot of that can be due to a company being bought by a competitor buy still using the same old name with lower quality products). Some of the older specific model lines worth mentioning are Alpine 35xx, Orion HCCA, Phoenix Gold ZPA, PPI Art, Soundstream Reference, and several of the old Rockford Fosgate amps. Lastly all brands are listed alphabetically in their respective category. Another odd situation is that some people feel US Acoustics mono and 2ch amps are 'Value' while the 4ch amps should be categorized as 'Poor'.

Elite - Arc, Audison, Brax, Helix, Linear Power, McIntosh, Milbert, Phass, Sinfoni, Tru Technology, US Amps, Zapco
Quality - Alpine, Cadence, Infinity, JL Audio, Kicker, Memphis, MTX, Phoenix Gold, Rockford Fosgate, Soundstream
Value - Clarion, HiFonics, JBL, Profile,
Poor - Audiobahn, Boss, Lighting Audio, MA Audio, Pyramid, Road Gear, Rockwood, Sony


Closing Thoughts - This FAQ & Buyer's Guide started out as an attempt to try and help people with some basic knowledge on this topic. After running through all of this I am a little concerned that there is so much information that the people who need it the most won't read through it. On top of that, I still feel like the information only scratches the surface. Any more pertinent information or especially links that might help shed more light on this topic is much appreciated. Please just don't turn this thread into an argument which amp is the best. I really hope that this might help some people out there. Thanks to all of the knowledgeable regulars on here who have contributed so much and a special thanks to BryanH and the suicidal eggroll for advice on this FAQ.
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Old 02-08-2005, 08:35 PM   #3
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Again, I hope that this wasn't too general or too much info or too much generalized info to be of any use. So, any other good links or info please feel free to add in. Just please don't take this oppurtunity to start a brand war.

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Old 02-08-2005, 09:32 PM   #4
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Lots of good info here. Another old series of amp that was in the quality bracket is the old Alpine Duo-ß series. I have a couple of those in a 2x40watt size. And I'll second the PPi Art series. Had one of those too.

-Peter
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Old 02-08-2005, 09:36 PM   #5
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Nice, but what is the deal with everyone wanting to be unabomber lately, I admit it, I did it too....
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Old 02-08-2005, 09:46 PM   #6
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Excellent guide, with lots of good references...sticky time.
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Old 02-08-2005, 09:47 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by typhoon663
Excellent guide, with lots of good references...sticky time.
hehe, that's what we said about the Sub Buyer's Guide....didn't happen
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Old 02-08-2005, 09:54 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pallendo
Lots of good info here. Another old series of amp that was in the quality bracket is the old Alpine Duo-ß series. I have a couple of those in a 2x40watt size. And I'll second the PPi Art series. Had one of those too.

-Peter
Oops, you used the correct model line-up name for the old Alpine amps. I said Alpine 35xx while I probably should have used the more correct name of Alpine Duo-ß series. Thanks for mentioning that and I will make sure to edit it later.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trunk_Monkey
Nice, but what is the deal with everyone wanting to be unabomber lately, I admit it, I did it too....
Actually I have always hated the fact that Una gives very little in the way of a sales pitch in everything he does. I actually take things one step further by commenting on brands; although that probably will draw the most criticism.

As for the sticky we are either blessed or cursed with the lack of moderation in these forums. Thankfully this section is one that needs very little in that regard IMO. But don't worry I will be lobbying for some changes in the sticky layout in the future, first I need to wade through a few more FAQ's of my own and organize my links.

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Old 02-08-2005, 10:39 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offset
Actually I have always hated the fact that Una gives very little in the way of a sales pitch in everything he does. I actually take things one step further by commenting on brands; although that probably will draw the most criticism.

offset
The only thing I'll say about this is I am sad to see my sub amp in the "Poor" category. (It's my own fault )
Nice job on this, btw.
I'll ask my local mod, who happens to be a mod here, if he will sticky this for us.
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Old 02-09-2005, 12:04 AM   #10
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Nice work buddy! I am too tired to read it all through but since you generally know exactly what is up with car audio I feel comfortable endorsing it just the same

Rick
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Old 02-09-2005, 12:48 PM   #11
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Good writeup. The mods put it in the "Threads of Note" sticky up top too.
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Old 02-09-2005, 03:40 PM   #12
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Where would Boston Accoustics amps fit in on your list? Specifically the GT-20 or GT-22.

I'm pretty new to car audio and the shop I went to was suggesting either of these to power a Diamond 10" sub in my STi.
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Old 02-09-2005, 04:04 PM   #13
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I would consider the Boston Amps in the upper end of the Quality range. Very nice amps for sure, but not quite at the level of Zapco, Tru etc.
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Old 02-22-2005, 05:55 PM   #14
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how about ed
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Old 02-22-2005, 06:17 PM   #15
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They change their entire lineup too often to be put on any kind of list. By the time one product has been out long enough to get a fair amout of reviews and a good grasp of the build quality, it's discontinued and another line is introduced.

But since this is the amp buyer's guide, and eD's amps are made by what used to be known as Avionixx, I can only guess as to their quality by lumping them in with the previous Avionixx amps. Some of the Avionixx amps were great, some had reliability problems, so I'd put them in between the Value/Quality sections.
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Old 02-22-2005, 08:16 PM   #16
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oic, maybe that's why there seemed to be tons of people not liking the ed amps while there's a handful of others who swears by it. Thanks for the clear up, as i'm slowly getting into audio myself.
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Old 02-22-2005, 08:36 PM   #17
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I think eggroll pretty well summed up the reasons for not including them since the model lines haven't exactly been around long enough to be industry proven. I can say that I believe the new eD amps are no longer based off Avionixx though. From talking with certain others I trust it sounds like the nine.1 is a very good high power amp for the money; while the nine.2 is just a run of the mill amp, nothing special but also nothing wrong. I can't imagine the nine.4 being much different than the nine.2 either.

offset
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Old 02-22-2005, 09:22 PM   #18
AcquaCow
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Bahaha! I have a box of alpine 3555's!

... and one 3353!

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Old 02-22-2005, 09:52 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offset
I think eggroll pretty well summed up the reasons for not including them since the model lines haven't exactly been around long enough to be industry proven. I can say that I believe the new eD amps are no longer based off Avionixx though. From talking with certain others I trust it sounds like the nine.1 is a very good high power amp for the money; while the nine.2 is just a run of the mill amp, nothing special but also nothing wrong. I can't imagine the nine.4 being much different than the nine.2 either.

offset
from what I've heard, they're different beasts than the previous Avionixx amps, but they are still being built by Avionixx. You really can't lump them together, but I did anyway
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Old 02-23-2005, 07:42 AM   #20
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Great info guys!! Nice work!! The only negative I can see is the "Poor Amp" catageory. Although I've never used any of those amps on the list I have see some of them perform very well in certain applications. I guess its all what your using it for....

cg
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Old 02-23-2005, 12:32 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgerald1
Although I've never used any of those amps on the list I have see some of them perform very well in certain applications.
Even a blind squirrel can find a nut once in a while, if you get my meaning. The categories are all based around odds and risk, I definately don't want to imply that someone can't get lucky.

offset
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Old 04-30-2005, 05:36 AM   #22
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Thanks for the good info offset. Mods: This should be sticky.
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Old 04-30-2005, 09:35 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gharari
Thanks for the good info offset. Mods: This should be sticky.
Sorry to break it to you, but this one is a sticky. It is just linked out of the one main sticky. Now for some reason my Sub FAQ never graduated to sticky status though.
http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/showthread.php?t=618889

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Old 04-30-2005, 09:23 PM   #24
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Cool...

got a question for ya about ground/RF noise. I'll post in a different thread.

edit:

Here's the link to the thread...
http://forums.nasioc.com/forums/show...51#post9662151

Last edited by gharari; 04-30-2005 at 09:35 PM.
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Old 07-21-2005, 02:39 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offset
Elite - Arc, Audison, Brax, Helix, Linear Power, McIntosh, Milbert, Phass, Sinfoni, Tru Technology, US Amps, Zapco
Quality - Alpine, Cadence, Infinity, JL Audio, Kicker, Memphis, MTX, Phoenix Gold, Rockford Fosgate, Soundstream
Value - Clarion, HiFonics, JBL, Profile,
Poor - Audiobahn, Boss, Lighting Audio, MA Audio, Pyramid, Road Gear, Rockwood, Sony

Were does Orion fit in? How are their components & subs?

Last edited by jaypine; 07-25-2005 at 12:46 AM.
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