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View Poll Results: What percent of people live by "managed debt"?
0-25 11 6.96%
26-50 12 7.59%
51-75 80 50.63%
76-100 55 34.81%
Voters: 158. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 10-04-2012, 09:57 AM   #301
nitsuj
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Originally Posted by plunk10 View Post
also, if you buy the cheapest base model brand new, usually the depreciation is kept to a minimum. For instance, a $20,000 stripper camry will be worth more than a loaded $20,000 Corolla, down the road.

That's another reason to buy used, as in many cases, the top models are not much more than the base model, on the used lot.
the sticker on mine was 22,xxx, no packages, which still includes power everything (but the drivers seat) and came with steelies and hub caps (which i was OK with since its my DD and going up the 17" alloys would my my tire cost go up)

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Originally Posted by FaastLegacy View Post
You stole that car, then. My previous car was an '07 Civic. It had 80k miles on it and I still traded it in at $10k.

seriously. it was an old lady special. got the car in 06, it was ~6 yrs old then with 32k miles on it, all the paper tags were still on the undercarriage and even on the axles, receipts from the day it was new all from the dealer and it was garage kept...
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Old 10-04-2012, 10:02 AM   #302
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I'm currently living on 'managed debt', but it is not large, under $2k. It was alot better at the beginning of the year but stuff that was unavoidable came up and keeps coming up
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Old 10-04-2012, 10:14 AM   #303
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My own situation went from bad, to worse, to great, in a matter of 5 months.

Bad:
I bought a house in 2006 @ 7.125% interest. My only existing debt.
Market crashed, house is worth 50% of initial cost, no chance of refinance.

Worse:
My car got totaled in June and my wife and I are expecting this February. Had to buy another car that could handle the kid stuff. Now have an expensive mortgage and additional car payment with little change in salary.

Great:
Parents offered to loan me some money to pay down my mortgage so that I could qualify for a refinance and save some interest. I would then pay them off over the course of about 10 years using the saved money. I called my lender to find the payoff balance, did some quick math to see where the 125% loan to property value would be at, and made a mental note of how much I would have to borrow from parents. In the process of this information acquisition, lender let me know the new Harp 2.0 regulations (3 weeks old now) do not require 125% ratio anymore. I now qualify for a refinance!

My loan % is dropping from 7.125% to 4.125%. My monthly payment is going down by $712!!!

400 will go to my newly acquired car payment, and 300 will be rolled back into the mortgage. With 25 years left on my loan, I will now have the house payed off in 20 years with the additional $300 principal.
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Old 10-04-2012, 11:28 AM   #304
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What's the verdict on no interest CC's for the sake of big purchases?

My current situation:

I put a good chunk of money on a CC to buy a big ticket item, call it $10,000.

Got the rewards points, and it's no interest for over a year. My repayment options are:

1. Pay the balance off now.

2. Wait until the end of the no-interest period and pay it off (making minimum payments along the way of course).

3. Divide up the balance and make even monthly payments so it's gone by the end of the no-interest period.




Option #2 makes the most sense from a strict $$$ perspective. However, I'm nervous about the fact that if I, for example, want a car loan between now and when I pay it off, I have 5 figures worth of CC debt sitting on my credit report.


Thoughts?
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:07 PM   #305
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What are you thinking about purchasing? I don't see any problems with that, but you're right, it probably hurts your credit score a bit.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:21 PM   #306
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FaastLegacy View Post
What are you thinking about purchasing? I don't see any problems with that, but you're right, it probably hurts your credit score a bit.
will it actually hurt his score (I don't know, so I'm asking?). I know it will not look great when you apply for a loan having that much of your revolving credit used up. Worst case, you put off the car purchase, or try paying off the 10k sooner.

I'd probably try to pay off the 10k over the year, rather than at one time.. but it really depends on if you think the money sitting in your savings account making .1 percent is worth it keeping there until the 0% apr is up.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:33 PM   #307
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REX8
What's the verdict on no interest CC's for the sake of big purchases?

My current situation:

I put a good chunk of money on a CC to buy a big ticket item, call it $10,000.

Got the rewards points, and it's no interest for over a year. My repayment options are:

1. Pay the balance off now.

2. Wait until the end of the no-interest period and pay it off (making minimum payments along the way of course).

3. Divide up the balance and make even monthly payments so it's gone by the end of the no-interest period.

Option #2 makes the most sense from a strict $$$ perspective. However, I'm nervous about the fact that if I, for example, want a car loan between now and when I pay it off, I have 5 figures worth of CC debt sitting on my credit report.

Thoughts?
#3.

I always take advantage of no interest CCs. No point in having good credit if you aren't going to use it.

I typically do #3 though because I don't like putting too much money in at once or having to pay a lot at the end. I usually break it up into 12 equal payments to ensure that I pay it off at the end of the promo period.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:43 PM   #308
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#3 is the way I've started to do it, but I hate seeing the balance on there.

I pulled a chunk of money out of savings to pay it off right away, then found a decent no-interest deal, so I threw the money at a 9.5% 90k student loan(which, $115k later, is now paid off as of last month. ).


Spaze, believe it would hurt my score somewhat, as the ratio of available to used goes down somewhat. Although it was on a card I didn't previously have...so...who knows.
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Old 10-04-2012, 01:49 PM   #309
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
#3 is the way I've started to do it, but I hate seeing the balance on there.

I pulled a chunk of money out of savings to pay it off right away, then found a decent no-interest deal, so I threw the money at a 9.5% 90k student loan(which, $115k later, is now paid off as of last month. ).
Dude, that is amazing!! congrats!

Quote:
Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
Spaze, believe it would hurt my score somewhat, as the ratio of available to used goes down somewhat. Although it was on a card I didn't previously have...so...who knows.
ok, I'm not sure how your score is factored exactly. I mean I know available credit is part of the calculation, but I was not sure how much it weighed into it. I'm sure as long as you make the payments and everything you;ll be fine and it will only be a small hit.

I actually just had my wife do that to take 3K off her 19% CC that she racked up. She decided to just pay it off in the year or something before the APR changed. It makes great sense!
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:06 PM   #310
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
I pulled a chunk of money out of savings to pay it off right away, then found a decent no-interest deal, so I threw the money at a 9.5% 90k student loan(which, $115k later, is now paid off as of last month. ).
Damn x2. 9.5% interest rate? Ouch. Paying off $115k in loans? Awesome. How long did that take?
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:07 PM   #311
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#2 would be my choice. If you already have liquid cash to pay off the balance (#1) you could put the rest of the money somewhere safe to make a little interest while the year ticked away.

Though, ending a $90K student loan is .

Quote:
Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
if I, for example, want a car loan between now and when I pay it off, I have 5 figures worth of CC debt sitting on my credit report.


Thoughts?
I didn't think debt to income was as important when purchasing a car (when compared to a house). In my experience, as long as you aren't already overloaded with debt AND you have a good credit score there shouldn't be an issue with an automotive purchase.
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:29 PM   #312
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Originally Posted by JC View Post
Damn x2. 9.5% interest rate? Ouch. Paying off $115k in loans? Awesome. How long did that take?
Yeah, private loans are brutal. About 4.5 years, although I was out of work/back in school for about 8 months of that time. I was aiming for 3 years before that little career hiccup cost me a very pretty penny.

I still have a bunch in lower interest (like 4%), but I'll be paying those back as slowly as possible.

It's good I guess and a relief somewhat...but they were my own doing, and a huge damper on moving on with adult life. Now I'm 30, don't own a home, don't have a ton in retirement, etc.

Don't cry for me though. The CC debt was an engagement ring for an orthopedic doctor. She's broke now, of course, but promised me a spec miata and a garage full of tires one day if I agree to do the dishes from now until my death.

I took the deal.

Last edited by REX8; 10-04-2012 at 02:38 PM.
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:34 PM   #313
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
She promised me a spec miata and a garage full of tires one day if I agree to do the dishes from now until my death.
Not sure If I would take that deal.


I fraking hate doing dishes
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:35 PM   #314
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
It's good I guess and a relief somewhat...but they were my own doing, and a huge damper on moving on with adult life. Now I'm 30, don't own a home, don't have a ton in retirement, etc.
Don't worry man, that sounds.. familiar. I'm almost 30 and don't have line of sight to paying off my loans in the next couple years. I did buy an investment property though, which could have be used to pay off my loans instead. It's all a balance I suppose.

Quote:
Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
Don't cry for me though. The CC debt was an engagement ring for an orthopedic doctor. She broke now, of course, but promised me a spec miata and a garage full of tires one day if I agree to do the dishes from now until my death.
Congrats! You'll end up doing the dishes regardless so I'd take that trade!
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:39 PM   #315
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Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
Spaze, believe it would hurt my score somewhat, as the ratio of available to used goes down somewhat. Although it was on a card I didn't previously have...so...who knows.
If it was a card you didn't previously have then it was a hard pull on your credit, which will lower your score.
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Old 10-04-2012, 02:41 PM   #316
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I wish I could do that new HARP program but my mortgage isn't Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac backed
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Old 10-04-2012, 03:01 PM   #317
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Originally Posted by FightingFalcon View Post
If it was a card you didn't previously have then it was a hard pull on your credit, which will lower your score.
Roger that. Do I leave it open when I'm done with it?

never have gotten a straight answer to that question. What to do with old CC accounts you don't use. Like some of the ****ty cards you get when you're a college kid?
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Old 10-04-2012, 03:10 PM   #318
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Originally Posted by REX8

Roger that. Do I leave it open when I'm done with it?

never have gotten a straight answer to that question. What to do with old CC accounts you don't use. Like some of the ****ty cards you get when you're a college kid?
Never close a card unless it starts charging you a fee. It seems counter intuitive but the more cards you have the higher your score is likely to be, assuming that you didn't just open a bunch.

Particularly never close your oldest cards. I cancelled my very first card (Capital One) because those douche bags started charging a fee like 5 years into my using the card. I told them to pound sand, reserve the charges and cancel my card. I've kept every card since then open but I really just use one of them.
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Old 10-04-2012, 03:16 PM   #319
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Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
Don't cry for me though. The CC debt was an engagement ring for an orthopedic doctor. She's broke now, of course, but promised me a spec miata and a garage full of tires one day if I agree to do the dishes from now until my death.
Wow, we're both almost on the same boat. Except I used the money from the Subaru as a funding source. One love for another. Except she promised me a Daytona as long as it's only used on the track and I stop riding street altogether.
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Old 10-04-2012, 04:03 PM   #320
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Originally Posted by aschen View Post
Not sure If I would take that deal.


I fraking hate doing dishes


faq dishes
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:12 PM   #321
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Originally Posted by FightingFalcon View Post
Never close a card unless it starts charging you a fee. It seems counter intuitive but the more cards you have the higher your score is likely to be, assuming that you didn't just open a bunch.

Particularly never close your oldest cards. I cancelled my very first card (Capital One) because those douche bags started charging a fee like 5 years into my using the card. I told them to pound sand, reserve the charges and cancel my card. I've kept every card since then open but I really just use one of them.
I know you never seem to believe a word I say - but....

If you have too many lines of credit open it can hurt you if you go for a loan on a house or other item. Say you kept open 10 CC with a potential line of credit worth 100k - they may/can/and do hold that against you as you could go out and rack all those cards up after you close. And at some point it will lower your score... and when you have to close them to get the loan you want, your score may get even lower.
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:16 PM   #322
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Quote:
Originally Posted by REX8 View Post
What's the verdict on no interest CC's for the sake of big purchases?

My current situation:

I put a good chunk of money on a CC to buy a big ticket item, call it $10,000.

Got the rewards points, and it's no interest for over a year. My repayment options are:

1. Pay the balance off now.

2. Wait until the end of the no-interest period and pay it off (making minimum payments along the way of course).

3. Divide up the balance and make even monthly payments so it's gone by the end of the no-interest period.




Option #2 makes the most sense from a strict $$$ perspective. However, I'm nervous about the fact that if I, for example, want a car loan between now and when I pay it off, I have 5 figures worth of CC debt sitting on my credit report.


Thoughts?
0 interest credit is offered in the hopes that you will fail to pay it off. Then it ramps up to 25%+ and you are screwed. I know, more of my failed logic - but can you predict how the next year will go? The bank is banking on you failing, and they know it happens.

So I say option #1 to be safe.
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Old 10-04-2012, 05:51 PM   #323
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Originally Posted by hedwagon View Post
I know you never seem to believe a word I say - but....

If you have too many lines of credit open it can hurt you if you go for a loan on a house or other item. Say you kept open 10 CC with a potential line of credit worth 100k - they may/can/and do hold that against you as you could go out and rack all those cards up after you close. And at some point it will lower your score... and when you have to close them to get the loan you want, your score may get even lower.
That's completely untrue. In fact, it's the opposite of true.

No part of your credit score is determined by the number of accounts you have open. The only way that that comes into account is by determining your debt to credit ratio, which will obviously always be higher the more accounts you have open. By leaving open all of your accounts, you are ensuring that you always have a high debt/credit ratio. Like I said previously, I've only closed one account in my life and my debt to credit ratio is something ridiculous, like 99% available credit. Closing accounts - particularly older ones - negatively impacts you in several ways: 1) shortens your average credit history, 2) shortens your oldest credit account and 3) lowers your debt to credit ratio.

While it's true that many open cards has the possibility of being abused, that would be reflected in your credit score if you have a history of doing so. I've got a bunch of open accounts but I only use one of them (plus a car loan and a mortgage) and so my credit score benefits because of that. While it's true that many organizations are going beyond simple FICO scores for a more in depth analysis, the FICO score remains the simplest and easiest way to determine someones credit worthiness. And any in depth analysis of someone with a high score and multiple open accounts would show that they haven't abused it in the past and aren't likely to do it in the future.

You can take my advice for whatever it's worth but my credit score literally cannot get any higher.
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Old 10-04-2012, 06:11 PM   #324
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Originally Posted by FightingFalcon View Post
That's completely untrue. In fact, it's the opposite of true.

No part of your credit score is determined by the number of accounts you have open. The only way that that comes into account is by determining your debt to credit ratio, which will obviously always be higher the more accounts you have open. By leaving open all of your accounts, you are ensuring that you always have a high debt/credit ratio. Like I said previously, I've only closed one account in my life and my debt to credit ratio is something ridiculous, like 99% available credit. Closing accounts - particularly older ones - negatively impacts you in several ways: 1) shortens your average credit history, 2) shortens your oldest credit account and 3) lowers your debt to credit ratio.

While it's true that many open cards has the possibility of being abused, that would be reflected in your credit score if you have a history of doing so. I've got a bunch of open accounts but I only use one of them (plus a car loan and a mortgage) and so my credit score benefits because of that. While it's true that many organizations are going beyond simple FICO scores for a more in depth analysis, the FICO score remains the simplest and easiest way to determine someones credit worthiness. And any in depth analysis of someone with a high score and multiple open accounts would show that they haven't abused it in the past and aren't likely to do it in the future.

You can take my advice for whatever it's worth but my credit score literally cannot get any higher.
Facts in below quote; says nothing about number of accounts... but types... which you can infer does mean if you have a number of certain types of credit it may reflect poorly, THAT part is my admittedly my guess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wikihow

Understand what affects your credit. The exact calculation of the FICO score is kept secret as proprietary information, but there are some general guidelines we can apply.

35% of your credit score is based on your consistent payment history and only includes payments later than 30 days past due.
30% is based on the percentage of your credit capacity being used; i.e., the ratio of current credit debt in comparison to total available credit or revolving credit. If you carry very low balances on credit cards, your score will be higher than if all your cards are nearly maxed out.
15% of your score is determined by the length of your credit history.
10% is based on the types of credit you have; i.e., installments (car payments, student loans, or a mortgage), revolving (credit cards or lines of credit), and consumer finance (bank loans and the equivalent).
10% is based on recent searches for credit and/or the amount of credit you've recently obtained. Every time you apply for credit it affects your score negatively.
Also having too few lines of credit open can hurt you. Almost didn't get my first house due to paying everything off early and not carrying loans for any real length of time.

Also made the credit mistake of closing my oldest credit card... guess it hurt... but I haven't felt it. I guess from the time I did that I didn't apply for any other credit until recently, ~2 years later.

Last edited by lag; 10-04-2012 at 06:19 PM.
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Old 10-04-2012, 06:18 PM   #325
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lag View Post
Facts in below quote; says nothing about number of accounts... but types... which you can infer does mean if you have a number of certain types of credit it may reflect poorly, THAT part is my admittedly my guess.



Also having too few lines of credit open can hurt you. Almost didn't get my first house due to paying everything off early and not carrying loans for any real length of time.
Yes, I'll agree that types of accounts definitely comes into play.

Based on my purely anecdotal experience, I'll say that retail cards are probably the worst to open. I took a somewhat significant hit when I opened my Best Buy card but I had also just gotten a house and a car so I didn't really need the credit score for a while. My score recovered a couple months later and I got the TV interest free so that's all I cared about.

Bottom line is that the whole point of a good credit score is to use it to your advantage. You shouldn't be afraid of a short term drop so long as it recovers and is there when you *truly* need it, e.g. a mortgage or a new car loan.
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