Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Sunday March 1, 2015
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
Click here to visit TireRack
Brakes & Suspension Forum sponsored by The Tire Rack

Losing traction? Need new tires?
Click here to visit the NASIOC Upgrade Garage...
Here you can view your subscribed threads, work with private messages and edit your profile and preferences Home Registration is free! Visit the NASIOC Store NASIOC Rules Search Find other members Frequently Asked Questions Calendar Archive NASIOC Upgrade Garage Logout
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Brakes, Steering & Suspension

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-25-2005, 07:42 PM   #1
98skuby
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 52632
Join Date: Jan 2004
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Douglasville, GA
Vehicle:
1998 impreza rs
black

Default stainless steel brake lines braking????

is it some what normal for a stainless steel braided brake line to burst while idling and pushing the brake? mine did. oh and anyone else skuby maual trans squeak like hell?
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
98skuby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2005, 07:46 PM   #2
boxered
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 61884
Join Date: May 2004
Chapter/Region: International
Location: buying guns
Default

Sounds like you bought uncoated SS lines.
boxered is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2005, 07:47 PM   #3
98skuby
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 52632
Join Date: Jan 2004
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Douglasville, GA
Vehicle:
1998 impreza rs
black

Default

uncloated? what would it be coated with?
98skuby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2005, 08:01 PM   #4
eltrouble
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 79493
Join Date: Jan 2005
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Cerritos, CA
Vehicle:
2003 WRB WRX Wagon
5 doors > 4 doors

Default

first of all, exactly what kind of brakes lines did you buy?
eltrouble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2005, 08:09 PM   #5
Uncle Scotty
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 16200
Join Date: Mar 2002
Vehicle:
OK Houston
we have an Uncle

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 98skuby
is it some what normal for a stainless steel braided brake line to burst while idling and pushing the brake? mine did. oh and anyone else skuby maual trans squeak like hell?


....never heard of that one, either one, before....
Uncle Scotty is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2005, 08:13 PM   #6
98skuby
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 52632
Join Date: Jan 2004
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: Douglasville, GA
Vehicle:
1998 impreza rs
black

Default

i was in my drive way pushing the brake pedal and car was on. then i hear pop and my pedal droped. so i looked for a puddle, sure enough it was the brake line, and i don't know what kind, i bought it with the car. but i did order some new ones to put on. stoptech stainless brake line from vivid.
98skuby is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2005, 08:17 PM   #7
Uncle Scotty
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 16200
Join Date: Mar 2002
Vehicle:
OK Houston
we have an Uncle

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by 98skuby
i was in my drive way pushing the brake pedal and car was on. then i hear pop and my pedal droped. so i looked for a puddle, sure enough it was the brake line, and i don't know what kind, i bought it with the car. but i did order some new ones to put on. stoptech stainless brake line from vivid.


....you and everybody else would be FAR-FAR better off staying as FAR-FAR away from vivid as possible......I seriously hope you don't get ripped off....I'd cancel the order and call the credit card company and tell them to stop payment and make sure your card dosen't get charged in the future for anything else....especially stuff you didn't order.....
Uncle Scotty is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2005, 09:02 PM   #8
eltrouble
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 79493
Join Date: Jan 2005
Chapter/Region: SCIC
Location: Cerritos, CA
Vehicle:
2003 WRB WRX Wagon
5 doors > 4 doors

Default

Quote:
....you and everybody else would be FAR-FAR better off staying as FAR-FAR away from vivid as possible......I seriously hope you don't get ripped off....I'd cancel the order and call the credit card company and tell them to stop payment and make sure your card dosen't get charged in the future for anything else....especially stuff you didn't order.....
I second that. Vivid is a pretty shady company, and they probably sold you some SERIOUSLY defective item. If you installed it correctly, it should never do that. Stoptech lines are some of the best brake lines you can buy, I highly suggest you buy from a more reputable company, or even from Stoptech directly.
eltrouble is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2005, 09:04 PM   #9
Arnie
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 1725
Join Date: Jun 2000
Chapter/Region: International
Location: Germany
Vehicle:
99 Subaru Impreza
GF silver

Default

If they are from Goodridge, they have a little yellow label that says that. they also have a lifetime guarantee so you shouldn't have to pay more than shipping.
Arnie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-25-2005, 11:52 PM   #10
nhluhr
John Wayne Toilet Paper
Moderator
 
Member#: 7327
Join Date: Jun 2001
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Seattle, WA
Vehicle:
2008 Mazdaspeed3
2006 Wrangler Sport

Default

When you get the lines from vivid, inspect them to make absolutely sure they are Stoptech and NOT their inhouse AgencyPower lines. AgencyPower are widely known to be very cheap low quality copies of the real things.
nhluhr is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 12:49 AM   #11
wastintime
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 68450
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bethesda, MD
Angry

Wow, I can't believe I found this thread and on the first try... the exact same thing happened to me literally two hours ago. I was sitting in my driveway, at idle, and had my foot on the brake... pop, and pedal to the floor. The right rear brake line had burst! I've never even heard of that happening... I've probably installed about 100 braided line kits, granted mainly on Porsches, and other than one instance where a sealing ring was deformed and it leaked, I've never heard of them just catastrophically failing. BTW, mine were the BFgoodrich lines.

The really scary part is I track the car! how many times have I nailed the brakes to go from 130mph down to 90 or so... not a thing went wrong for 14k miles of street driving and 5 or 6 track events, and then idling in my damn driveway the line explodes... weirdest thing I've ever heard of.

98skuby, let me know what you ended up doing... I'm also thinking of switching brands, that's crazy. Although, I have the goodrich lines on two other cars that have never had a problem...

Thanks,
Andrew
wastintime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 01:03 AM   #12
ballitch
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 74907
Join Date: Nov 2004
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: salem, OR
Vehicle:
98 cam'd EJ251
Wrx Tranny,slowr than ish

Default

i thought that stainless lines were supposed to be nearly indestructable......makes me wonder slightly if they are worth buying. good thing it didnt happen on the track..



~Josh~
ballitch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 01:11 AM   #13
kettsupp
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 68891
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: socal carson
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wastintime
Wow, I can't believe I found this thread and on the first try... the exact same thing happened to me literally two hours ago. I was sitting in my driveway, at idle, and had my foot on the brake... pop, and pedal to the floor. The right rear brake line had burst! I've never even heard of that happening... I've probably installed about 100 braided line kits, granted mainly on Porsches, and other than one instance where a sealing ring was deformed and it leaked, I've never heard of them just catastrophically failing. BTW, mine were the BFgoodrich lines.

The really scary part is I track the car! how many times have I nailed the brakes to go from 130mph down to 90 or so... not a thing went wrong for 14k miles of street driving and 5 or 6 track events, and then idling in my damn driveway the line explodes... weirdest thing I've ever heard of.

98skuby, let me know what you ended up doing... I'm also thinking of switching brands, that's crazy. Although, I have the goodrich lines on two other cars that have never had a problem...

Thanks,
Andrew
ahh! i have goodridge lines also. i've done 2 track days and one coming up on the 16th. do you guys think the stock ones are safer?
kettsupp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 01:16 AM   #14
Uncle Scotty
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 16200
Join Date: Mar 2002
Vehicle:
OK Houston
we have an Uncle

Default

...damn....I ran the Goodridge lines on my '02 for 4+ years....
Uncle Scotty is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 01:21 AM   #15
wastintime
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 68450
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bethesda, MD
Default

Kettsup,
In theory the ss lines really should be superior... in terms of strength, and pedal feel. Although I know a lot of guys who would argue they love the feel of rubber lines when racing. Personally I think the braided lines give a much better pedal feel on a racetrack. Heck, I run SS goodrich lines on my 911, and on the front straight at VIR, in 250ft. I brake from 140mph to 55mph... they're up to the task, and logically there is no way the burst pressure can be lower on a braided line than a rubber one.

I really can't explain what happend, but now that I know it happened to someone else in a simillar car under the exact same set of circumstances it makes me very suspect of either the lines themselves, or something odd about subarus and brake pressures at idle. Tomorrow I'm going to look very hard with the suspension compressed and look for any signs that I messed up and somehow routed the lines where they were chaffing or something was going on... of course I doubt it, track techs are pretty damn thorough and we wouldn't have missed something like that. Still, you're right this is dangerous, and even if it's my fault I need to know why the brake line failed. I mean it failed under the most ideal circumstances, what if it failed in an emergency braking situation?

At any rate, I wouldn't be freaking out, but if I've worried you, just inspect the hell out of them, and maybe give the brakes a good bit of pressure while doing so before your next event.
wastintime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 01:34 AM   #16
kettsupp
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 68891
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: socal carson
Default

thanx for the info. do some people really like the rubber lines on the track? i never tracked my sti with the stock lines so i wouldn't know.
kettsupp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 03:25 AM   #17
flyboymike
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 83765
Join Date: Mar 2005
Chapter/Region: South East
Location: The modern Yellow Peril
Vehicle:
2005 WRX wagon
WR Blue

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wastintime
Wow, I can't believe I found this thread and on the first try... the exact same thing happened to me literally two hours ago. I was sitting in my driveway, at idle, and had my foot on the brake... pop, and pedal to the floor. The right rear brake line had burst! I've never even heard of that happening... I've probably installed about 100 braided line kits, granted mainly on Porsches, and other than one instance where a sealing ring was deformed and it leaked, I've never heard of them just catastrophically failing. BTW, mine were the BFgoodrich lines.

The really scary part is I track the car! how many times have I nailed the brakes to go from 130mph down to 90 or so... not a thing went wrong for 14k miles of street driving and 5 or 6 track events, and then idling in my damn driveway the line explodes... weirdest thing I've ever heard of.

98skuby, let me know what you ended up doing... I'm also thinking of switching brands, that's crazy. Although, I have the goodrich lines on two other cars that have never had a problem...

Thanks,
Andrew

Okay, just to be clear, are you talking about lines made by BF Goodrich or Goodridge? Someone replied and thought you meant Goodridge.
flyboymike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 09:52 AM   #18
Subie Gal
GC84Ever
Super Moderator
 
Member#: 301
Join Date: Sep 1999
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: WA
Vehicle:
1970 FF-1 & '70 Van
02 WRX/01 RS

Default

i run goodridge ss lines on my rally car, and my street car

the ONLY time i've encountered an issue
is when the ss line became pinched between the strut and wheel well wall
thus rubbing a small hole in the line itself.

you've got to make certain these lines are secured properly

zip tie them to the strut to prevent movement
or damage.....


never have i had a defective issue with my ss lines.
and we go ballz out in seriously rocky terrain....




Jamie
Subie Gal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 11:00 AM   #19
TCE
Former Vendor
 
Member#: 100868
Join Date: Nov 2005
Default

Some thoughts and some history;

For many years I hand produced hoses using racing ends (not the DOT stuff) and sold hundreds of hoses with no issue. Sometime probably about ten years ago now the DOT line market took off like mad. Many companies scrambled to get into the street market and guys like me could not compete with the new 'swedged' hose end for cost and labor. These fittings became the industry standard for good reason- they were DOT compliant. (there is no such hose nor aftermarket caliper which is DOT approved) Compliant means the hose must not have a point of exit other than one inlet and one outlet. Hose kits today on some BBKs are still not 'compliant' if they use adapters at the hardline for example. This should be of no concern in the real world really but told as a side note here.

Swedged hoses use a nipple (hehe, he said nipple) and crushable outer collar and are then subject to high pressure to squeeze the collar down over the hose. On paper this look great. However labor being what it is and stampings being what they are things don't always go according to plan. The hose must be install on the nipple fully to grasp the barbs on it, if not it may only be held on by perhaps one of three. The crimp collar must be crushed around the hose in a uniform manner. If not the nipple can be fractured in this process.

Many or all hose suppliers claim their hoses are subject to XXXXpsi testing to insure their quality. Let me tell you something....for the most part this simply means the hose DESIGN has been tested to that level. Not EACH hose sold. I'm sure there are those who will claim this is not so and they test every one produced. If so then 'hats off' to you for doing so. However in the world of mass production I know it is not true because I in fact find debris in hoses (you do blow them out before installing them right?) from the mfg process.

As for the break (not brake, an odd mix up) it is most likely damage from:
1. Chafing on 'something' if the hose shows a leak in the braid.
2. Damaged hose end during install where the fitting got over torqued or banged up.
3. Poorly built hose. Perhaps 1/1000 produced?
4. High pressure application of the pedal- sitting with a foot on the pedal can develop high line pressure which may be beyond the hose spec. Very possible to build up 3000psi in them if not carefull. *all the more reason why bleeding practices should be done in a low pressure manner)

As for someones comment about hose covers, that's not a reason for damage. Yes it may have allowed excessive dirt to enter the braid (such as Jamie above) but for the normal street user this value is quite minimal. In my case the Subi is the ONLY jacketed hose kit I offer and we have no problems on hundreds of vehicles. But a worthy addition.

Last edited by TCE; 06-03-2006 at 02:12 PM. Reason: spelling, it sucks
TCE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 01:45 PM   #20
STi-MAN
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 70252
Join Date: Sep 2004
Vehicle:
05 STI
blue

Default

wow pretty interesting information.
STi-MAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 02:23 PM   #21
wastintime
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 68450
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bethesda, MD
Default

Sorry about that guys... I was little upset last night... I meant Goodridge, I don't know why BF Goodrich came out while typing

as for a chafing issue... I've installed 100s of brake lines on race cars myself... I find it very hard to beleive I made that mistake, but I'm not above reproach, that's why we just went over them with a fine toothed comb looking for a possible chaffing problem. Lol, we found that under the right circumstances, the driver's side (which didn't burst), coud have possibly chaffed, but it doesn't seem like there's any way chaffing was involved in this incident. All lines were routed correctly, and zip had been zip tied for extra security since the day they were installed as Jamie said

*As I said, I'm perfectly willing to admit I could have made a mistake, but doesn't it strike you as odd that the exact same thing happened to two similar cars under the exact same circumstances... to me that just screams it's either an issue with Subaru's brake pressure and or distribution at idle, or the line itself*

As for pressures... according to Goodridge, lol, granted they're not high on my list of good people right now:

Requirement as per FMVSS106 / SAE J1401
100 % PRESSURE TEST all hose assemblies.
3000 3600 PSI Hose assembly shall show no signs of leakage/rupture.
BURST TEST required for initial approval.
4000 PSI FOR 2 minutes. Pressure is then increased to 7000 PSI.
Hose assembly shall show no signs of leakage/rupture.
Result -
Stainless Braided PTFE Hose Burst test result 12750 13500 PSI
Recommended Safe working pressure 4250 PSI
Rubber Hose (Data supplied by UK Rubber hose manufacturer)
Note Hose data supplied by other rubber hose manufacturers may vary.
Burst test results 8000 9000 PSI
Recommended Safe working pressure 3600 PSI

there's no way your going to convince me that while sitting in my driveway starting my car I generated 3600PSI on a rear brake line... if I'd been standing on them, the front, you might convince me somehow, but not a rear line.

Last edited by wastintime; 06-03-2006 at 04:43 PM. Reason: afterthought
wastintime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-03-2006, 10:05 PM   #22
seattle944t
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 18308
Join Date: May 2002
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Seattle, WA
Vehicle:
2005 WRX STi
Silver

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wastintime
<snip>

there's no way your going to convince me that while sitting in my driveway starting my car I generated 3600PSI on a rear brake line... if I'd been standing on them, the front, you might convince me somehow, but not a rear line.
Actually, Sitting in your driveway standing on the brakes your front and rear line pressures will be the same. Your car has EBD, so no proprotioning valve it is all managed by the ABS system. The pressure only changes in response to wheel speed differeances/lock up.

But still - the lines should not burst in that case.
seattle944t is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2006, 12:03 AM   #23
wastintime
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 68450
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bethesda, MD
Default

I find that highly unlikely... unless you're saying this is a one time situation, where an EBD system will do this.

I think that's a gross oversimplification of the EBFD, especially if you've ever driven a Legacy GT, the owners manual even mentions how you shouldn't be surprised by it kicking in under normal braking conditions, it's constantly working, as opposed to only working when wheel slippage occurs.

and even if there's no biasing valve involved, you're not sending equal amounts of force front and rear... think about it, it goes against everything auto manufacturers have learned about brake systems in the past 40 years. If you ever run aggressive pad compounds for both street and track, you can even hear the difference... step on the pedal lightly, and you can hear the fronts, give it the slightest bit more pressure, and you can hear the rears start working. Believe it or not, most cars driven on the street almost never use their rear calipers.
wastintime is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2006, 01:49 AM   #24
seattle944t
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 18308
Join Date: May 2002
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Seattle, WA
Vehicle:
2005 WRX STi
Silver

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by wastintime
I find that highly unlikely... unless you're saying this is a one time situation, where an EBD system will do this.

I think that's a gross oversimplification of the EBFD, especially if you've ever driven a Legacy GT, the owners manual even mentions how you shouldn't be surprised by it kicking in under normal braking conditions, it's constantly working, as opposed to only working when wheel slippage occurs.
Thats exactly how it works - It is always working, and EBD only modulates pressure when it needs to - so if there is no reason (no wheel speed differentials) then it does *no* modulation. Sitting in your driveway there will never be any modulation. Driving 60MPH on the freeway and lightly using the brake there will also be no brake force modulation. But ramp up the pedal force and it will start creating too much brake force in the rear and the EBD will ramp down the rear pressure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wastintime
:
and even if there's no biasing valve involved, you're not sending equal amounts of force front and rear... think about it, it goes against everything auto manufacturers have learned about brake systems in the past 40 years. If you ever run aggressive pad compounds for both street and track, you can even hear the difference... step on the pedal lightly, and you can hear the fronts, give it the slightest bit more pressure, and you can hear the rears start working. Believe it or not, most cars driven on the street almost never use their rear calipers.
Yes and in the past 40 years they used two things - proportioning valves and different piston sizes front and rear. Now that we have electronics and ABS there is no need for a prortioning valve. Removing the valve saves the mfgrs money on every car. There are still different piston sizes front and rear though - so while the *line pressure* is the same, the brake force generated is not.

Since there are no proprotioning valves on EBD systems many manufactures warn drivers about hard braking when the ABS/EBD system is not working and to brake safely. Subaru takes it one step further and tells you not to drive your car at all! pg 3-24 in the (05 Impreza) manual says that when the EBD system is out it tirggers the master brake warning light AND the ABS light, and when the master warn is on it means don't drive.
On page 3-25 it futher says:
"even if the EBD system fails, the conventional braking system will still function. However, the rear wheels will be more prone to locking when the brakes are applied..." because only the relative brake piston size determines the brake balance.

I realize that the rears are used less - and that is another thing that the EBD system tries to balance out.
seattle944t is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-04-2006, 03:00 AM   #25
wastintime
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 68450
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Bethesda, MD
Default

lol, cars have officially become too smart for their own good... my thought was that nobody would be dumb enough to intentionally build a car that should not be driven, and I agree with Subaru on that point, if the ABS and/or EBD systems aren't working. Although, you could basically look at the EBD as an electronic proportioning valve... well why not have it set at a standard of say 70/30 (i'm just making up numbers) and modify as needed or as a particular driving situation arises. a 50/50 distribution being standard really makes no sense. As you said, it's dangerous, and stupid to drive on.

Equal brake pressure should make a smaller rear caliper clamp harder than the fronts, you have x amount of pressure pushing yfluid, wpiston, and zpad. On the front you have x amount of pressure pushing 4yfluid, 4wpiston, and 6zpad (at least on my car that's a rough estimate). Regarldless of what each is ultimately capable of, the rear is going to initially be far outperforming the front because it's already clamping for all it's worth. Now, since we already know that rear brake pads and rotors almost never wear out because they don't get used, how is it possible that the EBD works off of a 50/50 pressure distribution? As I said, when braking, I can feel and hear when my rears start to even really work at all. It sounds to me like your describing the EBD as a purely reactive measure, much like ABS, but isn't it much more likely that it's a proactive measure running off of many more sensors than just the ABS and wheel speed. In fact I'm pretty sure the only time it works with ABS is after the ABS has kicked in, rather than simply firing the calipers like a selenoid it veries pressure to maintain the braking event. I'm sure there's an accelerometer or two in there, and something determining the weight loading on each axle so the EBD has already decided, ok if he hits the brake now I'll be applying 80%front pressure 20%rear. Otherwise I don't see how the system could be of any practical use, and obviously it is of practical use. This is why I believe you have oversimplified how the EBD works.

I know on my Legacy GT, any time you touch the brakes the EBD is actively working, therefore it's got to be running off of something other than the ABS, because the wheels aren't even close to a position where they would lock, and it even says so in the owners manual, there's a little blurb on how you should not be surprised when you feel it working, I actually notice it less under harder braking, which makes sense. It's made an estimation of how much pressure to apply to the rear wheels, and then realizes it can apply more and does so in an attempt to maximize stopping ability. As opposed to my WRX, where I'd say the opposite is true, there's no evidence of an EBD system working, unless, you stab the brakes without warning. Perhaps newer models have an even more complex EBD... At any rate, I guess I need to go and pick some Subie engineers' brains. It'll be a fun conversation
wastintime is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
FS FL: Brand New StopTech 04-07 Sti Stainless Steel F/R Brake Lines + Motul Fluid everglow Suspension/Brakes/Handling 10 12-20-2009 05:31 PM
STi Brake Pads / SS Brake Lines / Brake Fluid TicketsForMePlease Private 'Wanted' Classifieds 4 11-30-2006 11:47 AM
Braided Stainless Steel Oil Lines? SJwrx Factory 2.0L Turbo Powertrain (EJ Series Factory 2.0L Turbo) 0 02-16-2003 07:30 PM
z1 stainless steel clutch line tdxflex Car Part Reviews 0 11-08-2002 07:39 PM
Brake Lines, Brake Lines, Brake Lines: Rate malaki Brakes, Steering & Suspension 0 05-03-2001 07:55 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:53 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2015, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2015 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2014, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.