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Old 02-02-2018, 07:01 AM   #1
AVANTI R5
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Default 2020 Porsche 911 Turbo



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The 991.2-generation Porsche 911 may be just a year old, but the German company is already working on the next iteration of the iconic sports car. Likely to be called the 992, the upcoming 911 is already being tested on public roads according to our paparazzi, who just sent us the first pictures with the coupe. Although the 992-gen 911 looks identical to the current model, that’s not to say that the upcoming sports car will carry over unchanged on the outside. The reason for the similar looks is that the 992 is still in its early stages of development, and thus Porsche uses the body of the current model, albeit with some modifications.

We don’t know much about the next-generation 911, but Porsche is working on a brand-new platform and new version of the existing engines. Alongside the standard model, Porsche will also launch a new Turbo variant, which will be sportier and will use a more powerful drivetrain. There’s no official word as to when it will arrive, but I expect it to break cover sometime in 2018. However, we should see an update model with the new styling features on the road by the end of 2017.

Much like all early prototypes, this 911 Turbo is actually the current 991.2-generation model fitted with extended fenders. So other than the fact that it will be wider and have wider tracks and tires front and rear, we don’t know much about it. However, based on the changes Porsche made to each generation of the 911, it’s safe to assume that the next-generation’s design will be evolutionary. All told, expect the car to remain relatively unchanged as far as shape and size go and retain the traditional, iconic cues of the original 911.


Expect the car to remain relatively unchanged as far as shape and size go and retain the traditional, iconic cues of the original 911.
Look for similar oval headlamps, but with new LED lights, and a revised front bumper. The latter should have a more aggressive design, maybe with larger vents on each side and a new center section. A larger splitter is also on the table, as Porsche will be looking to make the Turbo even faster. Onto the sides, we should see mildly revised side skirts and fender intakes, as well as new side mirrors. Around back, we should see a new pair of taillights. Porsche already changed them for the 991.2 facelift, so it’s safe to assume that the new lamps won’t be very different. The Germans could choose to extend them more toward the center fascia, but I’m taking shots in the dark here.

A new bumper is also in the books, alongs with revised vents and new exhaust pipes. Again, don’t look for anything wild, but be prepared for something unique. Lastly, Porsche will most definitely create a new spoiler and new engine cover grille. All told, we should get a sportier, more menacing 911 Turbo for the next generation.

It’s difficult to predict what Porsche plans to change on the inside, but I expect the 911 to keep the current format with the sporty center stack and instrument cluster. The Germans will probably aim to offer a more ergonomic control layout and a more aggressive center console similar to the 918 Spyder. The instrument cluster and the steering wheel will also be redesigned for a sportier look.

I expect the 911 to keep the current format with the sporty center stack and instrument cluster.
By the time the new 911 arrives, Porsche will also develop a new infotainment system, which will also bring a larger touchscreen, improved connectivity, and numerous cool features to use at the track. The seats will also be redesigned to offer improved comfort and better lateral support. As with most redesigns, the 992-generation 911 should come with improved, softer materials, new upholstery colors, and enhanced customizing options.

The big news here is that the 992-generation 911 Turbo will be first to crank out in excess of 600 horsepower.
There’s no confirmation as to whether the 911 Turbo will continue to use the current 3.8-liter flat-six or a brand-new engine, but it’s likely the upcoming drivetrain will be based on the existing one. The big news here is that the 992-generation 911 Turbo will be first to crank out in excess of 600 horsepower.

With the 991.2 facelift having brought an additional 20 horsepower to both the Turbo and Turbo S — taking them to 540 and 580 horses, respectively — it’s safe to assume that the range-topping model will arrive with at least 600; maybe even close to 620. The base Turbo model will probably have around 560 to 570 horsepower on tap.

The Sport Chrono package will also make a significant difference when added to the mix.
Porsche should also improve the dynamic boost function that improves engine response by maintaining charge pressure during load changes as well as find way to improve fuel economy even more. The Sport Chrono package will also make a significant difference when added to the mix.

Performance-wise, both the Turbo and Turbo S should be quicker. The current Turbo hits 60 mph from a stop in just 2.9 seconds, with a top speed 198 mph, while the 911 Turbo S reaches the benchmark in just 2.8 seconds with a top speed of 205 mph. These figures are already downright amazing, but with new engines and chassis, Porsche should be able to shave a tenth-second of the 0-to-60 mph sprint. Specifically, look for the Turbo to get there in 2.8 clicks and the Turbo S to hit 60 mph in 2.7 ticks.

Performance-wise, both the Turbo and Turbo S should be quicker.
Top speed should also increase, but not by much. The Turbo will step into 200-mph territory for the first time at around 201 mph, while the Turbo S should be able to do 207 mph.

In the transmission department, there will be a new seven-speed manual and a revised PDK automatic with quicker-than-ever shifting potential.

Prices

As it usually happens when new models are released, the 992-generation Turbo will be a bit more expensive than the outgoing model. I’d venture to say that Porsche will increase prices by at least $5,000, so the Turbo will come in at around $167,000 before options. The Turbo S, on the other hand, will cost well in excess of the current $190,700, but it won’t go into $200,000 territory before options.

The AMG GT may be an entirely different vehicle due to its front-engined configuration, but Mercedes-Benz developed it specifically as a competitor for the Porsche 911. Sporting a classic grand tourer design that still retains a few styling cues seen on the discontinued SLS AMG, the AMG GT is also on par with the 911 in terms of luxury features. Under the hood, it also uses a turbocharged engine, in the form of a 4.0-liter V-8, but it’s not as powerful as the 911 Turbo with the base model coming with 456 horsepower and 440 pound-feet on tap. The GT S version gets more oomph at 503 horses and 480 pound-feet, but it’s significantly slower from 0 to 60 mph at 3.7 seconds. Finally, the range-topping GT R cranks out 577 horsepower and 520 pound-feet, which places is as close as you can get to the 911 Turbo, but its 3.5-second sprint is more than a half-second behind the Porsche. But if you can live without the tremendous off-the-line sprints, the Mercedes-AMG GT is a solid alternative to the 911 Turbo, especially if you’re looking for a more affordable proposition. The base model retails from $111,200, while the GT S starts from $131,200. The GT R model costs $195,000 before options.
The AMG GT may be an entirely different vehicle due to its front-engined configuration, but Mercedes-Benz developed it specifically as a competitor for the Porsche 911. Sporting a classic grand tourer design that still retains a few styling cues seen on the discontinued SLS AMG, the AMG GT is also on par with the 911 in terms of luxury features. Under the hood, it also uses a turbocharged engine, in the form of a 4.0-liter V-8, but it’s not as powerful as the 911 Turbo with the base model coming with 456 horsepower and 440 pound-feet on tap. The GT S version gets more oomph at 503 horses and 480 pound-feet, but it’s significantly slower from 0 to 60 mph at 3.7 seconds. Finally, the range-topping GT R cranks out 577 horsepower and 520 pound-feet, which places is as close as you can get to the 911 Turbo, but its 3.5-second sprint is more than a half-second behind the Porsche. But if you can live without the tremendous off-the-line sprints, the Mercedes-AMG GT is a solid alternative to the 911 Turbo, especially if you’re looking for a more affordable proposition. The base model retails from $111,200, while the GT S starts from $131,200. The GT R model costs $195,000 before options.

While it may be too early for a proper conclusion, it’s safe to assume that the 992-generation 911 will be a significant improvement over the current model. Anything else would be a failure and Porsche is perfectly aware of that. Tradition requires the German firm to deliver increasingly better vehicles and the 911 is a nameplate that’s bound to improve every few years in order to survive.
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Old 02-02-2018, 07:03 AM   #2
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Default 2020 Porsche 911 Turbo spy shots

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Spy photographers have spotted a prototype for a new generation of the Porsche 911 Turbo, the everyday supercar.

The new Porsche 911 is coming late this year, initially in Carrera and Carrera S guises. But you can count on there being multiple other versions to cater to Porsche’s discerning clientele. We’re talking close to two dozen distinct models eventually.

Included among the range will be the new Turbo.

2020 Porsche 911 Turbo spy shots - Image via S. Baldauf/SB-Medien
2020 Porsche 911 Turbo spy shots - Image via S. Baldauf/SB-Medien
The prototype may look like testers for the Carrera. However, a number of clues identify it as the new Turbo.

The fender extensions are hiding a widened track, while the gaping hole in the flanks and the cooling vents at either side of the rear fascia indicate an engine with extra potency. A closer inspection reveals the signature square-shaped exhaust tips of the Turbo, too.

As we’re still at an early stage, the car is devoid of aerodynamic features we can expect as part of the final design. But you can bet there will be complex aero elements including a more complex rear wing on the final car.

2020 Porsche 911 Turbo spy shots - Image via S. Baldauf/SB-Medien
2020 Porsche 911 Turbo spy shots - Image via S. Baldauf/SB-Medien
The powertrain for the new Turbo is likely to be a twin-turbocharged flat-6, as is the case for its predecessors. With the current Turbo putting out 540 horsepower, expect this new one to have something in the 580-600 range. All-wheel drive should be standard.

Though yet to be confirmed, it’s possible the Turbo S will pair an electric motor with the twin-turbo engine to deliver something in the order of 650 hp. Recall, Porsche is once again open to electrifying the 911, and the next Turbo is a good starting point. It fits in with Porsche’s top-down strategy for electrification, which has seen a hybrid powertrain used for the range-topping Panamera Turbo S E-Hybrid.

The new 911 Carrera is expected to bow in the second half of 2018. The Turbo should trail the Carrera by about a year.


Hit link for all photos

https://www.motorauthority.com/news/...mage=100642202
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Old 02-02-2018, 08:12 AM   #3
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Good lord those rear fenders.
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Old 02-02-2018, 01:35 PM   #4
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What a nothing article. 100% click bait.

It SHOULD have more power. The sports chrono SHOULD add more performance.

Breaking news. Porsche is working on cars for 2020 and they are going to all look like a Porsche and they should all be slightly better.

Ground Breaking.
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Old 02-19-2018, 07:28 AM   #5
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Default 2019 Porsche 911: leaked image shows new rear design

Click bait, whatever

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shows new rear design




2019 Porsche 911: leaked image shows new rear design
Next 911 will be first available with hybrid powertrain, but Turbo models will retain combustion engines

The 2019 Porsche 911 has been leaked to the internet, showing the car's new rear design long before it is officially revealed.

A single image of the new model's back end was posted to Instagram but has since been removed. The image captures the new rear light bar, raised rear engine cover and vertical vent slats.

Porsche UK made no comment when asked about the image's authenticity, but the similarity in design and shape to spotted development cars suggests it is indeed genuine. The car isn't expected to be revealed until later this year.

When it arrives, the next-generation 911 range will be led by a 630bhp Turbo S. As shown by our spy pictures, the entire line-up will receive a more muscular look that takes influence from the iconic design of Speedster models from yesteryear.



The Turbo and Turbo S models will remain the most aggressive, with wide rear arches and a fixed rear wing signalling their potent performance (more on that later).

Much of their added muscle comes from the next-gen 911's haunched back, which resembles that of 2011's 997 Speedster (itself a model influenced by the original 356 Speedster from 1954).

The raised rear is likely to be a design feature rather than a technical requirement to fit a hybrid powertrain. Although the 992-generation 911 will be the first to be offered with hybrid technology, that this change will have no noticeable impact on the car's exterior design.

Engines and power outputs

The future 911 range, including the GT3, will exclusively use turbocharged six-cylinder engines, marking the end of naturally aspirated units for the line-up.

The GT3 will deliver more than 500bhp, while the standard models are set to get an extra 10-15bhp over today’s Carrera and Carrera S. The current Carrera and Carrera S deliver 364bhp and 414bhp respectively, so the 992-generation 911 will produce 375-429bhp.



The hybrid 911 model will be introduced in 2020. It will run the flat-six with an electric motor, providing limited all-electric and performance-boosting functions.

The electrified powertrain has provided engineers with a packaging challenge, but product line director Erhard Mössle, now retired, previously told Autocar that "CO2 regulations in 2020" have spurred on the hybrid model's development.

The range-topping Turbo S will be powered by a ramped-up version of the current car's 3.8-litre flat-six to become a genuine threat to the Ferrari 488 GTB. Porsche engineers have decided against including hybrid technology on the variant in a bid to save weight.

The future flagship model will borrow engine hardware from the GT2 RS to ensure that its output jumps by 50bhp to 630bhp compared with today's Turbo S - edging it to within 30bhp of the 488 GTB.

The regular Turbo model that sits beneath the Turbo S is predicted to have 592bhp, which is 61bhp more than today's 991 version. Both the Turbo and Turbo S will be capable of more than 200mph.

Performance will, therefore, be scintillating. The current Turbo S's 0-62mph time of 2.9sec is expected to be beaten, while the new Turbo will duck beneath the three-second mark for the first time. Of the Porsche cars in production after the 992's launch, only the electric Mission E will be quicker off the line - although it won't join the family until 2020.



Evolved chassis

The 992 911, which is the eighth generation of the sports car, will be built around an evolved MMB structure with a wider footprint than the current 991-gen range. The photographed test car above (spotted last year) wore wheel arch extensions - evidence of a wider track that will give the 992 improved high-speed stability and better space for rear passengers. The car's length will remain unchanged.

Modular design will enable the structure's use for next-generation versions of the Boxster and Cayman, while it could also influence the design and engineering of future Audi R8 and Lamborghini Huracán models. The updated structure will make more extensive use of high-strength steel and aluminium in order to cut weight.

Visible on the photographed cars is a full-width retractable rear wing. This will come as part of several active aerodynamic parts tasked with enhancing stability with downforce when additional grip is required. An active front spoiler is also a possibility, although this hasn't been seen on test cars so far.



Interior and dashboard

The latest Cayenne and Panamera offer the biggest clues as to what the 992 911's dashboard design will be like. Spotted development cars have featured a central rev counter that's flanked by two digital screens, located in a cluster that curves around the centre console touchscreen.

The technology mimics the wraparound design of Volkswagen Group stablemate Audi's Virtual Cockpit but keeps a more traditional layout, with revs remaining the main focus.

Like its forebears, the 992 911 will also be produced in Targa form, although this isn't expected to arrive until later.

Is This Our First Look At the New Porsche 911 Without Any Camo?

[Update] The original poster has removed the image, but too little too late as other Instagram users have shared it.

An anonymous tipster has brought to our attention that someone has posted an image of what seems to be the new Porsche 911 (992) on Instagram. In fact, the photo has been up on the social medial channel for nearly a week, but it’s only now the very interesting image is beginning to make the headlines (you'll see it everywhere in the following hours.) While we can’t say for sure it’s 100% legit, there are reasons to believe that it is.

For starters, a quick look on the Instagram post reveals the image was shot within a Porsche facility, at the Porsche Zentrum Augsburg in Gersthofen, Germany to be exact. Second of all, the car doesn’t have a license plate, so you won’t be seeing it on public roads anytime soon. Third of all, the near-production prototype matches what we have seen in a plethora of spy shots, featuring wider rear wheel arches and a new taillight design.

Assuming this is the real deal and someone is not playing tricks on us with his Photoshop skills, it appears we are looking at the new Carrera 4S judging by the car’s derrière, particularly its quad exhaust tip arrangement. Although we can’t fully see the front end design, you can check out a bit of the 911’s fascia in those two mirrors mounted high. The nose seems to be a bit sharper towards the center of the bumper and the headlights are also a tad bit different, but obviously we can’t make out all the details at this point.

All things considered, it looks like we’re dealing with a faux pas on Porsche’s part as the new 911 won’t officially debut until well into the second half of 2018. Until then, the Geneva Motor Show scheduled for next month will be the venue where the facelifted 911 GT3 RS (991.2) is going to be unveiled, following a massive leak at the beginning of the month. A new Speedster might be in the offing as well, but we haven’t heard anything about it in a while.

P.S. We can't help but wonder why the blacked-out "Porsche" lettering is sitting so high on the rear bumper, right below the light strip, but maybe it has to do with the fact this isn't the final car.

Special thanks go to our anonymous tipster!

Source: ninastegmaier / Instagram

Last edited by AVANTI R5; 02-19-2018 at 07:50 AM.
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Old 10-21-2018, 08:45 AM   #6
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2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S Ride Along: A Sneak Peek At An LA-Bound Treat




Quote:
When Porsche introduces a new 911, the automotive world takes notice. Not because there’s any likelihood of it looking different from the last one, but because everyone’s interested in seeing how Porsche will improve on one of the world’s most accomplished all-around sports cars.

Even here in pre-production form undergoing final testing on the West Coast of America, the “disguised” 911 strikes a familiar shape. There are revised rear lights just visible under the body cladding that bring a new look to the model, but overall, this is clearly a Porsche 911.

This new 911 is designated the 992 series. It replaces the current 991 series and is slated to be shown in full at the upcoming Los Angeles Auto Show, likely as a 2020 model.

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S prototype
Before that, though, we’ve managed to hop in the passenger seat alongside a veritable “who’s who” of Porsche personas tasked with validating the 992 as it reaches the sign-off stage prior to its LA unveiling.

Sitting behind the wheel as we ride shotgun is “Mr. 911,” a.k.a. August Achleitner, vice president, Product Lines 911/718. Achleitner is joined by Matthias Hofstetter (director, Powertrain Product Lines 911/718), Andreas Pröbstle (project manager, Complete Vehicle Model Lines 718/911, and Alex Ernst (team leader, Testing). These three, among many others, will drive the 992 thousands of miles to ensure that it meets, and exceeds, customers’ expectations once the rear-engine sports car arrives in showrooms early next year.

The development drive is in San Francisco and the greater Bay Area, as the local conditions (i.e. weather, altitude, road surfaces, and driving conditions – read traffic) are ideal for testing. We’ll be riding along in one of four Carrera S models. The cars are a mixture of rear- and all-wheel drive models, and regular and Sport Chassis options. Three of the cars rely on Porsche’s quick-shifting PDK transmission. One car, however, uses a traditional seven-speed manual transmission. It’s a bit of an oddity in this company, as the Carrera S will initially be launched exclusively with the self-shifting gearbox. (Fear not, manual fans, as the seven-speed stick will join the entire Carrera line-up when non-S Carrera arrives early next year.)

Porsche has prepped the transmission to accept an electric motor.

The PDK in the 992 is a different unit compared to the current model’s, as Achleitner explains:

“This is a completely new transmission for the 911. The PDK is now [an] eight-speed, taken from the new Panamera but with a changed layout.”

A new 911 you won't see:

Notably, Porsche has prepped the transmission to accept an electric motor (although the space for that theoretical motor goes unoccupied for now). This doesn’t mean a gasoline-electric hybrid 992-series 911 is a guarantee, though, as Achleitner is quick to point out that current battery performance isn’t yet good enough for Porsche to push the technology into its famed sports car.

Still, this hasn’t stopped Porsche from preparing the car for the inevitable day that battery technology catches up to the performance demands of the 911. There’s a double-layered space in the body to house the eventual battery packs, which, like the gearbox casing, remains empty for the time being. Even so, the new transmission weighs about 44 pounds more than the current seven-speed PDK. In order to offset the extra mass of the transmission, Porsche employs additional aluminum in the body of the 992. Retaining the weight of the existing car has been one of the goals, and Porsche claims it’s succeeded in achieving this.

Achleitner shares that “there will be no narrow-bodied Carrera,” this time around, and that all 992 models will wear the wide rear hips of the Carrera S prototypes present today. While the rear-end width happens to be the same size as that of the current 911 GTS and GT3, engineers managed to increase the front track of the new car by 1.57 inches (40mm). The Carrera S rides on staggered wheels, with 20-inch fronts and 21-inch rears wrapped in 245/35 ZR20 and 305/30 ZR21 rubber, respectively.

There’s plenty of grip too, and Achleitner and his team – evidently in a hurry – hustle the 992s up a winding canyon road at extralegal speeds. The car’s wider track allows engineers to install more forgiving anti-roll bars that aid turn-in, improve traction, and give the Carrera S an inherent agility without negatively impacting ride quality. There’s assistance here, too, and the optional rear-wheel steering on the car I’m riding in further sharpens turn-in response.

Achleitner’s engine man, Hofstetter, has done a great deal of work to enable the 992 to pass both ever-stricter emissions and consumption regulations, while still exceeding the performance figures put up by the car it replaces.

The characteristic flat-six howl remains apparent even though it’s a forced-induction engine.

Power comes courtesy of a revamped twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter flat-six engine. There’s a new intake system, revised cooling (the intercoolers now sit on top of the engine rather than on the sides), revised turbocharger housings, a new exhaust, and piezo fuel injection. Shorter paths, quicker spooling turbos, reduced temperature, and more precise fuel injection all work in the 992’s favor and further improve the immediacy of the powertrain’s responses.

The Carrera S is said to produce 450 horsepower and 391 pound-feet of torque, which is enough oomph to push the rear-drive Carrera S to 60 mph in less than 4.0 seconds. Meanwhile, the base (non-S) Carrera will use a detuned, 385-hp variant of the engine in the Carrera S.

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S prototype
The powertrain of the Carrera S in which I'm riding responds with fervor, and the twin-turbocharged engine pulls strongly to its redline with the enthusiasm of a naturally aspirated unit. U.S. cars are unhindered by exhaust filters and sound all the better for it. The characteristic flat-six howl remains apparent even though it’s a forced-induction engine, and some amusing cracking and pops are emitted from the exhaust pipes on the overrun.

As in the past, there’ll be higher performance derivatives above the Carrera and Carrera S, including Turbo and Turbo S trims – the latter of which will reportedly pack a 650-hp punch. The rumor-mill is full of news of the next-generation GT3 and GT3 RS, as well, and whether or not the motorsport cars will follow the forced-induction route of the Carrera twins. Nobody’s saying anything today, but the collective Porsche fanbase is hoping turbocharged GT3s are still a few years off.

The 992 has to move with the times, though, and there’s some new technology and assistance systems to appeal to customers who expect convenience items in their German sports car. As such, the 992 will be available with items such as lane-keeping assist, lane-departure warning, and a night vision system, the latter of which will be an optional piece of equipment (it’s likely that the aforementioned lane tech will be bundled in with a package that also includes adaptive cruise control).

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S prototype
What is definitely standard fitment, though, is a new Wet detector system. Linked to the Wet mode (one of several driving modes that also include Normal, Sport, Sport+, and Individual settings), the 992 features acoustic sensors in the front wheel wells that detect water on the road surface and adjust the stability control system, gearbox settings, and rear wing position to help the driver maintain stability in the wet. Achleitner says it’s useful as the 992 is relatively light and rides on wide tires. The Wet detector system operates automatically, and independent of the windshield wipers. After all, standing water is not synonymous with rainfall.

A proximity key with push-button start is also standard, and the 911’s door handles cheekily pop out to meet you as you approach the car. Options include the usual list of choices such as a 0.39-inch (10mm) lower Sports Chassis, a throatier exhaust system, the aforementioned rear-wheel steering system, and Porsche’s Sport Chrono package (which traditionally includes a stopwatch and steering-wheel-mounted controls for switching between the drive-mode settings). A choice of carbon ceramic discs (PCCB in Porsche-speak), as well as Porsche’s new PSCB (Porsche Surface Coated Brakes), will also be available.

The new 911 is almost here:

The interior remains largely disguised during our ride, but what’s impossible to hide is the large analog tachometer and its 7,400 rpm redline. The tach is framed by a pair of configurable screens, such as those in the Panamera and Cayenne. The dash-mounted, center touchscreen appears to be pulled from the Panamera and Cayenne, as well.

We’ll have a proper look inside the next-generation 911 in LA next month, and we expect to have the opportunity to formally drive the car early next year. But today, from the passenger seat, the 992 appears to follow the path of evolutionary change that’s marked the model for more than 50 years.

https://www.motor1.com/reviews/26925...-s-ride-along/
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Old 10-21-2018, 10:18 PM   #7
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That's one way to tack an antenna on the back of a sports car
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Old 10-22-2018, 10:06 AM   #8
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I tried to dig around their configurator and couldn't find a way to do it. Does Porsche make a 911 model that is AWD/Manual?
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Old 10-23-2018, 08:13 AM   #9
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Pretty funky rear end they’re moving too..
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Old 10-23-2018, 02:18 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by Pre View Post
I tried to dig around their configurator and couldn't find a way to do it. Does Porsche make a 911 model that is AWD/Manual?
Both the Carrera 4 and 4S are AWD and base 7 speed Manuals

And a 4 GTS has a stick
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Old 10-23-2018, 03:27 PM   #11
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Pretty funky rear end they’re moving too..
Agreed. It just looks “off.”
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Old 10-23-2018, 03:53 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by godfather2112 View Post
Agreed. It just looks “off.”
I feel like Porsche always looked different enough from VW to make it special, but that rear end looks like it was designed by VW designers, not Porsche designers. Not a fan of the direction.
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Old 10-23-2018, 04:45 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Skylab View Post
2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S Ride Along: A Sneak Peek At An LA-Bound Treat







https://www.motor1.com/reviews/26925...-s-ride-along/


I don't know how I feel about it, kinda like this but with waaaay more bumper height
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Old 10-23-2018, 09:30 PM   #14
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Both the Carrera 4 and 4S are AWD and base 7 speed Manuals

And a 4 GTS has a stick
Thanks.
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Old 11-28-2018, 08:46 AM   #15
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News 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S and 4S debut







LOS ANGELES — The new 2020 Porsche 911 Carrera S and 4S are here, debuting on the eve of the 2018 Los Angeles Auto Show at an event at the Porsche Experience Center in Los Angeles. The 992 is both a replacement and an evolution of the 991-generation 911 that made its debut at the 2011 Geneva Motor Show. The pair pack updated (though undoubtedly 911) styling, more power from a turbocharged flat-six and a new interior that borrows heavily from the new Porsche Panamera and Porsche Cayenne. The car will hit U.S. dealers in summer 2019.

At the heart of every 911 is a rear-mounted flat-six engine. These days, in every model save for the GT3 and GT3 RS, the engine is assisted by a pair of turbochargers. The 2020 Carrera S and all-wheel-drive Carrera 4S use an updated version of the 3.0-liter flat six from the 991.2. The engine makes 443 horsepower and 390 pound-feet of torque, up 23 horsepower and 22 pound-feet over the outgoing model. Improvements include larger turbos, a new intercooler and new injectors. Standard equipment includes a new eight-speed PDK dual-clutch transmission (one more than the 991). A manual will be offered sometime later for those who still prefer to row their own.

Extra power means improved performance. With the PDK, a Carrera S Coupe hits 60 mph in just 3.5 seconds. The Carrera 4S drops that by a tenth. That's 0.4 seconds quicker than the outgoing model. Cars with the optional Sport Chrono package are even quicker, with 0-to-60 times dropping to 3.3 seconds in the Carrera S and 3.2 seconds in the Carrera 4S. The Carrera S has a top speed of 191 mph, with the 4S topping out at 190.

Visually, the 992 doesn't depart much from its predecessor. That said, it was never going to look like anything else. The car's all aluminum bodywork is wider than before, with the front growing by 1.77 inches. The rear of the Carrera S is now as wide as the Carrera 4, 4S and GTS models. 20-inch wheels are available up front, while rear wheels increase to 21 inches. The 992's door handles now sit flush with the bodywork. As we've seen in spy photos, the front fenders now extend all the way to the bumper, fully encompassing the headlights like on the old air-cooled models. All models (not just those with all-wheel drive) come with a full-width LED taillight.

The interior is significantly different than the outgoing model. A center stack filled with buttons is replaced by a slick, clickable panel like the one on the Panamera. The shifter is smaller and more of a stalk than a large handle. The dash is taller and houses a wider infotainment screen. The center-mounted tachometer is flanked by two large digital displays that can be customized to display a variety of information. The 992 comes with 12 months of Porsche Connect Plus, an internet-based system that uses swarm data to display traffic.

Other updates include a new Wet Mode that detects water on the road and adjusts the ABS and stability control accordingly. The 911 will also pack automatic emergency braking, a night-vision camera and adaptive cruise control.

The Carrera S and 4S Coupe go on sale next year and will inevitably be followed by variants like the 911 Turbo and 911 GT3. Prices start at $114,250 for the S and $121,660 for the 4S.
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Old 03-15-2019, 06:32 AM   #16
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Default Porsche's 8 goals for the 2020 911

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Automakers often use focus groups made up of current owners to help them develop the next model of any given vehicle. They want to know what works and what doesn’t, so they “clinic it.”
Porsche didn't bother with that for the 992-generation 911.

Motor Authority spoke with August Achleitner, vice president of the 911 and 718 product lines, about what Porsche's goals were for the 2020 911. "Mr. 911," as he is known, told us that the company already knew from feedback from owners what it wanted to work on, what the weak points were, and what changes needed to be made due to legal requirements around the world.

However, Achleitner was clear on Porsche's main goal.

“When we launch a new 911, it’s a very simple goal. A new 911 has to be better than the old one,” he said.

Achleitner got more specific and shared the eight things Porsche wanted to improve on the 2020 911:

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S, Valencia, Spain, January 2019
2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S, Valencia, Spain, January 2019
1) Improve dynamics.

“How can we improve the vehicle dynamics again after the big step with the 991 in comparison to the 997 before?," Achleitner asked rhetorically. One answer was making the car wider. Both the S and 4S models are now wide-body cars, which means the S model gained 1.5 inches of rear track. Up front, both models are wider by 1.8 inches, too. “With a wider track in front and rear, the vehicle dynamics came to a new level," Achleitner said. The wider track improves traction and lets the rear axle build up more stability. The adjustable adaptive dampers were also updated with new hardware and software. In their firm setting they are now firmer than in the 991-generation car. Porsche says that improves roll stability, steering response, and cornering grip. In my first drive review of the 2020 Porsche 911, I was amazed that Porsche managed to make a brilliant car handle even better. But Porsche did something else to improve the dynamics, and that's the next point.



2) Enlarge the diameter of the rear wheels.

Calculations and simulations showed that enlarging the diameter of the rear wheels would improve dynamics even though it would also add weight. The 2020 Porsche 911 S and 4S now ride on 21-inch wheels at the rear and 20s up front, though the tire sizes haven't changed at 305/30 rear and 245/35 up front. While this influenced all of the surrounding areas of the suspension and the packaging of the car, Porsche felt it was worth the effort because it would make the handling more neutral and controllable. The company had experience with the practice as the 918 Spider and GT2 and GT3 cars already use staggered wheel sizes, and there are no better handling Porsches than those. Handling becomes more neutral because the bigger rear wheels provide greater rear end stability and grip without having to go with a wider tire.



2020 Porsche 911
2020 Porsche 911
3) Improve comfort.

Porsche didn't want to go all out here to create a two-door Panamera, Achleitner said, but the company achieved this goal by giving those adaptive adjustable dampers a wider spread of damping force. Not only can they be firmer as noted above, but they are softer as well. They react much quicker than before—up to 100 times per second—and they react in all stages of damper travel to adapt to road conditions. It’s the first major change to the Porsche Active Suspension Management dampers since they were launched in 2004. According to Porsche, these changes make absorbing quick, short bumps like cobblestone roads much more effective. In my drive, I found the 911 to be comfortable for a sports car, even more so than in the past, but I'll need more time behind the wheel, especially on bad roads to see just how effective the changes are.


4) Improve interior noise.

This didn't mean reducing total sound in the cabin so much as reducing noise from the wide rear tires, which Achleitner said is just loudness. After all, Porsche owners want to hear the distinct, mid-tonal thrum of their flat-6 engines. They don't, however, want to hear water and pebbles splash around in their wheel wells or the white noise of tires on rough pavement.

To combat noise, Porsche started with a stiffer structure where the rear suspension parts mount to the body, used more-efficient sound insulation in the rear wheel well areas and behind the rear seats, and chose top strut mounts that provide better insulation. Even the larger rear wheels contribute to less tire noise because they can run at a lower air pressure.



5) Fulfill emissions requirements.

Porsche pursued three main strategies to reduce emissions. The engine now uses asymmetrical intake camshafts that allow adjacent valves of a cylinder to open with a different degree of lift (2 and 4.5 millimeters versus a consist 3.6 millimeters in the 991) under partial load. This, combined with other efforts to optimize fuel management and combustion reduce emissions and improve fuel economy. A new particulate filter in the exhaust system also reduces emissions, though it is not included in U.S. cars. An extra gear for the new 8-speed automatic transmission is another fuel- and emissions-savings measure. Finally, Porsche future-proofed the car this time around by developing it with a hybrid in mind—likely a plug-in hybrid—in case regulations change anywhere in the world that require either stricter emissions or zero-emissions zones.

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S, Valencia, Spain, January 2019
2020 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S, Valencia, Spain, January 2019
6) State-of-the-art connectivity.

The 911's center touchscreen grows from 7.0 to 10.9 inches for the 2020 911 and its hardware and software provide faster processing of inputs and data. As it has since 2017, the system offers Apple CarPlay compatibility and can be controlled with tablet-style stretch, pinch, and swipe gestures. Internet radio, a wi-fi hot-spot, and real-time traffic information for the navigation system were previously available, but a new onboard modem now provides these services, as well as access to smart home functions and Amazon Music.

2020 Porsche 911 active lane control2020 Porsche 911 rear turn assist2020

Porsche 911 night vision



2020 Porsche 911 Carrera


7) Improve the assistance systems

“Nobody buys the 911 because of the assistance systems," Achleitner said. However, he noted that the average buyer has three cars in the garage, so they may wonder why the 911 lacked some systems that come on their other cars. With that in mind, Porsche decided to add safety systems and make most of them optional. Forward-collision warnings with automatic emergency braking is not optional. It's available for the first time, and it's standard. We think that's a good thing. A new Wet mode is also standard. It adjusts various vehicle systems, most notably the stability control, to make the 911 safer to drive in the rain or in snowy or icy conditions.

Blind-spot monitors and adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go capability carry over as options, but the blind-spot monitors add a new Turn Assist Rear feature that monitors the rear of the car when turning at speeds under about 9 mph to warn if, for example, bicyclists may be approaching. Active lane control with traffic sign recognition, and surround-view and night vision camera systems are optional this year.

2020 Porsche 911 Carrera
2020 Porsche 911 Carrera

8) Emphasize muscular styling.


With its rear-engine layout, the 911 has always had a muscular tail, but changes for the 992-generation made it even bolder. Both the S and 4S models are now wide-body cars with wide tires on big wheels. That gives the car natural rear haunches that make it look like a predator ready to pounce. Achleitner pointed out, however, that the wider front track helps, too. We agree. It plays off well with the rear to make the car look wide and sculpted with a hint of the sexy Coke-bottle shape that designers desire. Up front, Porsche added lines to the center of the hood that, in the front view, will be the easiest way to tell the 992 generation from the 991. They are among the very few character lines on a very clean design.
https://www.motorauthority.com/news/...r-the-2020-911
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Old 03-17-2019, 07:54 PM   #17
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so much car porn
hnnnnggg!
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Old 03-18-2019, 07:37 PM   #18
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The 911 gets bigger and bigger..... Miss the 993 iterations.
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