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Old 06-02-2019, 08:38 PM   #1
ScubaruImpreza05
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Lightbulb First time rebuilding an engine, questions inside

I honestly never thought I'd be in this forum, unfortunately it is not for a good reason. I spun a bearing and have rod knock, confirmed this afternoon by a very knowledgeable master mechanic. I am planning on tearing this down and rebuilding it mostly by myself, though if I feel uncomfortable I will get help.

The background - This is a 2009 Legacy 2.5i motor swapped into an 06 2.5i Impreza. The motor has 25k miles on it as of now. Everything matched up except we needed to change out the oil pickup and the oil pan. Besides that, all the stuff that attached to the engine were swapped over from the 06 motor. Why not just buy a cheap used 2.5RS/i motor you say? Well, because I plan on beating this like a stubborn mule at Rallycross and Autocross events. in fact, I'm pretty sure I spun the bearing at the last Rallycross event I did a month ago. I just didn't know what rod knock/bearing issues sounded like. That's why I want to rebuild rather than swap in again, I'll probably just have to go through this again.


One thing I know I am going to need is a very good service manual. Please let me know what you guys suggest. I am pretty handy at mechanical stuff, but have never done something on this scale. The overall goal while rebuilding this will be to 'bulletproof' the bottom/internals so that it can take the beating and not fall apart. I'm not looking for bulletproofing to add power, I am looking to bulletproof to add reliability. Along those lines, for parts I have the following questions:

1. What rod bearings are built like a tank so that I don't run into this issue again?

2. Should I look into either different crank caps, or some sort of reinforcing plate for the crank caps to prevent distortion from torquing?

3. Are the stock pistons and rods fine as they are, since I am not adding power? is there anything to upgrade around the rod bearing, such as maybe different lower ends that bolt the rod to the crank? Or do those just come with new rods?

4. Any bearings/seals/gaskets I should upgrade when putting the motor back together? I am assuming I'll need to buy a few anyways, so if there is a chance to upgrade for reliability sake, please recommend.

5. Is there any reason I would want to or need to upgrade the piston rings while I am in there?

6. While not bottom end related, I am thinking of upgrading the valve springs to prevent possible float. I am at redline enough at these events and wondering if it is a real concern. Is it necessary at near stock power (A heart pounding 168 hp @ Crank)?

7. Anything else I might have missed?


I appreciate your time if you read through this, and of course any advice and insights would be huge. I can watch youtube videos and read articles all day long, but there is no substitute for experience and I know that. In regards to rebuilding this, I will be getting help from my father who has rebuilt V8's and industrial diesel engines, so that should smooth stuff out.
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Old 06-04-2019, 09:41 AM   #2
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Is there a reliable source for good used OEM cranks, if I need to replace my crank?
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Old 06-04-2019, 10:21 AM   #3
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Use the oem service manual. You can find them on the internet for free if you're handy with Google or just get on eBay and search for the manual for the year car your rebuilding. Do to the rebuild correctly you'll need to invest in a number of tools, most importantly good quality micrometers, a dial bore gauge, a feeler gauge, calipers, piston ring compressor, accurate torque wrenches that have been calibrated in the last couple years, ect. Don't cheap out on tools or you will get a cheap, loosely build motor that won't last.

You also need to find an experienced machine shop that has done Subaru engines before and can bore/hone the cylinders, bore/hone the main line if needed, do subaru valve jobs, ect.

Cranks are cheap enough that it makes the most sense to buy a new sti nitrided forged crank for $300 or eBay or any online parts dealership, just google sti nitrided crank, you'll find it. Replace any rods that spun a bearing, they also maybe $50 brand new or cheaper used on eBay.

ACL and King bearings are the only ones worth using and although King is more expensive they are worth the cost to get very consistent oil clearances. Be prepared to buy multiple sets of bearings to mix and match a size up or down to get clearances acceptable.

Subaru blocks are a split case design meaning there are no main caps like on an inline engine, the case halves themselves are the main caps so to measure main clearance the bearings need to go in each side of the case then you bolt the casehalves together and torque them in a very specific sequence then measure with the mics and bore gauge.

Rebuilding these engines is a broad topic and an expensive hobby. If you don't plan to do more than one then buy a new oem shortblock or a uses block and save yourself the money. If you want to learn as a hobby than welcome to the club and feel free to ask any other questions you can think of. We'll do our best to answer what we can.
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Old 06-05-2019, 10:52 AM   #4
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Well, I am trying to do this on the cheap. I know that sentence is cringe worthy but it's my reality. To be honest, if possible, I want to try and reuse the oem crank, this assuming it is not beat up. I'll have to make that call when we get in there. I also have a spare shortblock that did not spin a bearing I could use for spare parts if necessary. If I do need to replace the crank, would I need to bother with the sti crank? I'm not adding power, and I've read the cranks are usually the last thing to be an issue internally on engines. I know the lubrication pathways aren't great, but with running synthetic and not adding any power, would it be sufficient for stock redline use? Or does the sti crank have better oiling pathways?

As for the shortblock rebuild, I know it's not fair to tear it apart and then drop it off at a shop to rebuild, so I am going to have to do the best I can. More than likely I will pay for a machine shop to wash and measure everything out for me so I know what to get. I want to pay as little in labor as possible, again budget constraints, so I'll be following a service manual and YouTube mixture to try and get it all correct.

Since the motor only has 25k on it, I think I am going to leave the pistons/rings alone. I'd be surprised if I got in there and there isn't alot of cross hatch left. I also doubt I'll exceed their power handling ability ever. This assuming I get in there and everything looks fine. I'm prepared to replace the rod(s) that the bearings went bad on, but it will be oem replacements.

Would it be beneficial to go for ARP studs in my case? I will be at redline alot, but not sure if that matters as much in my non-turbo motor as it would a wrx or sti.

Oh also, the lubricating grease used for putting all the parts together, anything special or just use any old assbly grease? I assume I can get a synthetic version. Once everything is together and motor is running, do I want to change the oil shortly afterwards because of that assembly grease?

If I think of others as I start compiling my parts list, I'll post up. I do appreciate the input, and I wish I could follow it completely but my budget means I have to take the built-at-home risk and approach. My biggest fear is the precision measurements part, I'm not good with that stuff. That's why I'm thinking I'll pay for the machine shop to do those measurements and let me know what I'll need.
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Old 06-05-2019, 03:24 PM   #5
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You're going about this all wrong. From what you just told me you cannot afford to rebuild the engine yourself and you should stick to a used motor in good shape to get the car running again. If you can't commit to the bare basic measuring tools required to get the vital measurements on the engine than you cannot hope to get a good result without a lot of luck.

If you spun a bearing the crank IS damaged there is no question about it, the rod that the bearing spun on is also likely damaged and will need to be replaced. At minimum it will require atleast $100 in machine work to grind undersize all the rod journals then you use oversized bearings to make up the difference. If the metal particles that went through the engine also damaged the main journals (likely) they too WILL require machine work to hone smooth or again grind undersize. This is not an option, without that machine work the engine WILL fail again. That said a brand new STI crank is $300 as are most of the other cranks so its isn't a matter of needing a stronger crank but the fact that a new one is cheap and you'll have perfect dimensions on all the journals making setting oil clearances easy.

If you cannot afford $300 on a new crank you are in way over your head. You're looking at a new crank or machine work to correct the current one ($100-$300) about $100 in journal bearings, around $200 in orings and gaskets for reassembly, over $100 in oil and filters to flush the engine after first start then to break it in, $30-$50 in new coolant, $200 in measuring tools, feeler gauges, basic assembly and disassembly tools, and the list goes on. Stop trying to cut corners and realize that you either do it right the first time and cry about the price that time and that time alone or you do it twice or more and the cost keeps going up. Which option is cheaper?

I hope I've made my point. I'm not talking out my ass here, I've done a few of these and watched other people cut corners on their own engines and seen the results.
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Old 06-06-2019, 09:21 AM   #6
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I agree with Dev here. I think its gonna be more time and money to do what you are talking about.

Buying a used short block, and re-using your cylinder heads. That's gotta be the cheapest way.
Plus swapping in a running motor, you know it works.
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Old 06-06-2019, 09:22 AM   #7
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There are ppl like you who rebuilt their engine only to have it spin a bearing after they fire it up.
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Old 06-06-2019, 09:36 AM   #8
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I agree with Dev here. I think its gonna be more time and money to do what you are talking about.

Buying a used short block, and re-using your cylinder heads. That's gotta be the cheapest way.
Plus swapping in a running motor, you know it works.
Exactly. No worse feeling than cutting the corners, starting it up, having it fail, and then thinking about all those shortcuts you took and realizing that is the reason it all went wrong.
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Old 06-06-2019, 10:46 AM   #9
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I suppose I expected these replies, so no hard feelings. I have an 06 shortblock with 100K miles on it, and this 09 motor with 25k miles on it. I quick looked up EJ25 shortblocks and I can get a no history one for 750 or a certified good one with 75k miles and 1500. Neither feel like a winning formula either. If I had the money, I'd be getting an IAG built block and be done with it, but I do not. I still want to have my fun in autocross, hence the desire to rebuild this.

As far as experience, my father will be helping me with this. He has micrometers, and other tools he has used often before. He also used to work at a machine shop when he was younger, so I am banking on him having the experience to help me through this, among the fact he has rebuilt several of his own motors from car engines to tractor trailer engines. I also have found a machine shop not 3 miles from my house.

I will buy a crank, I will buy rods, I will buy the bearings needed. If I buy the crank, I assume I can match the bearings based off the brand new crank rod journals? Looking at ACL/King bearings, they have OEM sizes, then under and oversize bearings. I'm assuming on a stock crank, I would be matching the OEM size?

Full gasket and seal kit is ~$200, Rods are $56 each new, Bearings $100 for a kit, STi Cranks $350, Plus miscellaneous tools and lubricants, gasket sealer, cleaners. Assuming a financial buffer for surprise costs, $850 then. Assuming we do not mess the building up, I'd have a 25K motor with a strong bottom end for less than a 75k mile motor that has been through who knows what before I got it, and sat for who knows how long.

I know you guys are just being honest with me, and I appreciate it. I spoke with a Subaru Performance shop yesterday who basically told me the same thing, then pointed me to IAG for a shortblock which is $3k. I can't justify that for a weekend hero car unless I have bigger plans for it, which I do not.

Honestly I'm in a tough spot because I am apprehensive of doing this, but financially it makes more sense, at least on paper. Even if I buy a known good shortblock, I'd still want to tear it down and put in tougher bearings, and I'd probably still run into sizing issues, wouldn't I? My 100K block probably has good compression, but 100K wear and tear on all the journals and such.
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Old 06-06-2019, 11:13 AM   #10
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I found this as well, seems like maybe a decent in-between?

https://www.amazon.com/Non-Turbo-Reb...gateway&sr=8-1

Their page on subaru rebuilds, short and long blocks - https://sunwestautoinc.com/subaru/?g...vD4aAmaP8P8HAQ

"New NPR Teflon Coated Hyper-eutectic Pistons
New King Rod and Main Bearings
New Pin Bushings
Crank is ground and polished
Rods are reconditioned on both ends"

Last edited by ScubaruImpreza05; 06-06-2019 at 11:31 AM.
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Old 06-10-2019, 04:16 PM   #11
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Don't forget the machining costs. For a spun bearing, that cylinder is likely going to need some love - a power hone may not bring it back. You can pick up stock cranks that are in decent shape for $150 to $200. You might be able to reuse 3 of the rods, so you can save some money there as well.

Also, don't forget a belt tensioner and timing belt pulleys, these should be replaced on higher mileage cars. You'll also probably need to get a new oil pump if it sucked up shavings, its going to be toast.

Lastly, you'll want to have the heads resurfaced at a minimum. I've done enough "budget" rebuilds on these to know that there is always incidentals that you don't anticipate - helicoil kits for broken bolts, crusty hoses that need to be replaced. These little things add up.

As far as tools go, you really don't need anything serious. Lots of folks will tell you that you need all kinds of specialty tools - BS. A good torque wrench, feeler gauge, maybe a micrometer, and a manual and you'll be fine. Check out the subaru mike videos on youtube, and go for it.
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Old 06-11-2019, 03:47 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pploco View Post
Don't forget the machining costs. For a spun bearing, that cylinder is likely going to need some love - a power hone may not bring it back. You can pick up stock cranks that are in decent shape for $150 to $200. You might be able to reuse 3 of the rods, so you can save some money there as well.

Also, don't forget a belt tensioner and timing belt pulleys, these should be replaced on higher mileage cars. You'll also probably need to get a new oil pump if it sucked up shavings, its going to be toast.

Lastly, you'll want to have the heads resurfaced at a minimum. I've done enough "budget" rebuilds on these to know that there is always incidentals that you don't anticipate - helicoil kits for broken bolts, crusty hoses that need to be replaced. These little things add up.

As far as tools go, you really don't need anything serious. Lots of folks will tell you that you need all kinds of specialty tools - BS. A good torque wrench, feeler gauge, maybe a micrometer, and a manual and you'll be fine. Check out the subaru mike videos on youtube, and go for it.
Thanks for the reply.

I had not thought about the oil pump, but makes sense. I'll add it to the list. I am currently rebuilding my spare motor as a 'test run' and decided to just go all in and refresh everything. Bought a refresher kit offline. The OEM crank is in good condition, but will need to measure out the main crank journals. The conditions of the journals themselves look very good, but I want to be sure.

3 of the 4 cylinders are in pretty good shape, one has some surface rust that will need help. I did some research and bought a flex hone and will have it flex honed by someone who has done honing for a bunch of engines and knows what they are doing. All 4 cylinder walls have the factory crosshatch still, but going to resurface for the new piston rings to seat on.

I have not pulled the rod caps and as such don't know the rod bearings and rod conditions, but there were no shavings or anything in the oil pan/ pickup when ti was pulled, so if anything it might just be uneven wear. In any case, I have a set of replacement rod bearing coming in, and if necessary I can get a new rod.

I also decided I will be checking for bent valves, cleaning the valve seats,and lapping each valve seat before I put it all back together. I'll also of course be setting the valve clearances after this. Not looking forward to dealing with the stupid VVT-i rocker assembly when I need to put it together, but I think I can manage, and I found a good video online of how to do it.

I also have every seal, gasket, and other items coming in the rebuild (re-ring) kit. If it all goes together as planned, it will be a refreshed motor.

I think I have alot of stuff handled out, and I have been keeping track of waht fits to where, in regards of rods to pistons, pistons to cylinder, etc.

I will probably have some questions as I start re-assembling stuff. I am renting a heated power washer and will be doing my due diligence on a through block cleaning and re-oiling the surfaces after drying them.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:56 AM   #13
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So some quick questions as I head into the full clean portion of this rebuild, and trying to plan ahead:

1. When cleaning the crank, pistons, and rods, is any degreaser fine? Do I need to be worried about removing a coating on anything? I have a few cans of aerosol engine degreaser, and also a gallon of super clean for dipping and soaking items.

2. I still have the heads/valvetrain in one piece. Is it acceptable to clean it like this, and then just do the valve seats/valves/ etc cleaning as I tear down, lap, and rebuild the heads and valvetrain with the new seals/gaskets?

3. When assembling the rods back onto the crank, I haven't been able to get a clear picture of the safest stuff to do the final journal cleanings with. So far, 91% or greater alcohol or Brake Kleen seem to be the front runners, with a no-lint cloth. Either sounds fine?

4. Is 'Subaru' Mike Baumer a reliable video source when I start assembling? I will be compiling a step by step document to follow so I do not miss anything, but having a video to give me an idea of how to safely assemble stuff is the next best thing to having someone live there. I have a computer on my work bench, so a video would be awesome to have help guide me

5. Main journals and Rod journals: do I need to use assembly lube on BOTH sides of the bearing, or only on the side making contact with the crankshaft journal? Would lube on the block side cause the bearing to spin or something bad like that?


I'll have more questions I am sure, but that's what is immediately pressing on my mind. As I am researching and studying more, I'm feeling a bit better about this, but having experienced people answer/help me is big. Hence why I am here.

So far I have bought:

Tools:
Engine stand $50
Gasket scraper $20
Engine degreasers - $20
Brass Dremel brushes and bits $10
Engine stand hardware $10
Dead-shot hammer $10
Oil canister $10
Flex Hone $45
Valve lapping tools - $20
Tool accesories, trays, etc - $30


Lubricants/ Gaskets/ seals/etc
Royal purple Assembly Lube $15
Anaerobic Gasket maker $20
Re-ring kit $180


I am sure I missed stuff, but that's the gist of it so far. My father has the machine shop measuring tools, so i was able to avoid those costs.
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Old 06-13-2019, 09:16 AM   #14
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Another question: I am reusing the rod bolts. What torque lube is recommended for Subaru OEM stuff? I see plenty for aftermarket, but haven't found an article or thread going over the proper rod bolt grease for re-assembly using OEM bolts.

Thanks.
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Old 06-13-2019, 09:40 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ScubaruImpreza05 View Post
So some quick questions as I head into the full clean portion of this rebuild, and trying to plan ahead:

1. When cleaning the crank, pistons, and rods, is any degreaser fine? Do I need to be worried about removing a coating on anything? I have a few cans of aerosol engine degreaser, and also a gallon of super clean for dipping and soaking items.

2. I still have the heads/valvetrain in one piece. Is it acceptable to clean it like this, and then just do the valve seats/valves/ etc cleaning as I tear down, lap, and rebuild the heads and valvetrain with the new seals/gaskets?

3. When assembling the rods back onto the crank, I haven't been able to get a clear picture of the safest stuff to do the final journal cleanings with. So far, 91% or greater alcohol or Brake Kleen seem to be the front runners, with a no-lint cloth. Either sounds fine?

4. Is 'Subaru' Mike Baumer a reliable video source when I start assembling? I will be compiling a step by step document to follow so I do not miss anything, but having a video to give me an idea of how to safely assemble stuff is the next best thing to having someone live there. I have a computer on my work bench, so a video would be awesome to have help guide me

5. Main journals and Rod journals: do I need to use assembly lube on BOTH sides of the bearing, or only on the side making contact with the crankshaft journal? Would lube on the block side cause the bearing to spin or something bad like that?


I'll have more questions I am sure, but that's what is immediately pressing on my mind. As I am researching and studying more, I'm feeling a bit better about this, but having experienced people answer/help me is big. Hence why I am here.

So far I have bought:

Tools:
Engine stand $50
Gasket scraper $20
Engine degreasers - $20
Brass Dremel brushes and bits $10
Engine stand hardware $10
Dead-shot hammer $10
Oil canister $10
Flex Hone $45
Valve lapping tools - $20
Tool accesories, trays, etc - $30


Lubricants/ Gaskets/ seals/etc
Royal purple Assembly Lube $15
Anaerobic Gasket maker $20
Re-ring kit $180


I am sure I missed stuff, but that's the gist of it so far. My father has the machine shop measuring tools, so i was able to avoid those costs.
1. Using cleaning solvent in either a solvent tank it a big, clean, plastic tray

2. You can clean it all together first. Spun bearing engines require a greater attention to detail during cleaning though.

3. Brake clean and a clean lint free cloth is just fine

4. His videos are a great source of knowledge. I have watched all of them many times and looked through many of the factory service manuals while assembling my own engines doe reference and I have yet to hear him say something that was wrong or wasn't in the manual. The guy is obviously factory trained.

5. NO LUBE ON THE BACKSIDE OF THE BEARINGS! The side that goes into the block / the rod body must be perfectly clean. This side should never rotate so it needs no lube. Only lube the side that touches a crankshaft journal.
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:33 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dev6565 View Post
1. Using cleaning solvent in either a solvent tank it a big, clean, plastic tray

2. You can clean it all together first. Spun bearing engines require a greater attention to detail during cleaning though.

3. Brake clean and a clean lint free cloth is just fine

4. His videos are a great source of knowledge. I have watched all of them many times and looked through many of the factory service manuals while assembling my own engines doe reference and I have yet to hear him say something that was wrong or wasn't in the manual. The guy is obviously factory trained.

5. NO LUBE ON THE BACKSIDE OF THE BEARINGS! The side that goes into the block / the rod body must be perfectly clean. This side should never rotate so it needs no lube. Only lube the side that touches a crankshaft journal.
Perfect, thank you very much I am running through his videos a few times and also using it to help compile my step by step document. I am not at the building phase yet, I am trying to source a hot pressure washer, but I have just about everything else I need, including cleaners, cloth, and clean seal heavy duty plastic bags to place each piece in after it is cleaned, dried, and given a surface lubrication to prevent rust.

One note, it is confusing since I keep forgetting to specify. Right now I am rebuilding a motor that was good when pulled, and the only reason I am rebuilding is because of surface rust in the cylinder walls, so needs to be honed. This engine had 100k miles and leaky head gaskets, so I decided to use this as an educational tool and this way if all goes well, I have 2 good motors and a good amount of experience. As I read through the service repair manual, and watch some good tutorial videos, I am slowly getting more comfortable with this project.

Again, I am extremely grateful for help with the questions I can;t seem to find good answers for on my own, and may just need to be answered by those with experience I do not have.
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Old 06-13-2019, 05:48 PM   #17
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Bad News everyone! Close to positive the cylinder are irreparable. Did a light flex hone to remove all the rust and see what kind of damage happened, and it's pretty bad. My father is of the opinion that by the time we'd have a good surface, the sleeves would be too thin.

He's getting a second opinion tonight, but if I need to buy case halves, do I need to find EJ253 specific case halves, or would any EJ25x case halves work? Such as, would all the bolt holes for accessories be there?

Problem resolved. Found a very good price and brand new EJ253 case halves. Needs a quick glaze hone, and I need to get an 'A' sized piston to fit one of the cylinders.

Last edited by ScubaruImpreza05; 06-14-2019 at 12:11 AM.
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Old 06-14-2019, 01:46 PM   #18
BlackFighter
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Post pics so we can see if its usable or not.
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Old 06-14-2019, 03:27 PM   #19
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Post pics so we can see if its usable or not.
Already bought the new block for a real good price. Now I have some stuff to do. Unfortunately the new block does not match the piston sizes of my old one from the factory. My old black was AB + BB, the new block is AB + AB. I hopefully have pictures below.

I have a question: Does the piston size stamped on the case half designate cylinder order? As in, if you are standing next to the driver side of the case, so the lettering can be read, and it is 'AB' stamped, does that mean the front cylinder is 'A' piston size and the cylinder to the rear of the engine on that side is 'B' piston size?

I ask, because I have my cylinders labeled where they came out of, and it seems the opposite, and it is confusing me.

Also, I will be using a bore gauge to see if the used pistons will work with needed tolerances. The pistons have such little wear on them, I would really like to avoid any extra costs now.

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Alternately - If I go ahead and buy a new set of pistons, they will be CAST and NOT forged. I will never make the HP to need forged pistons, and I have no desire to. This is for fun beating rallycross, not top HP road course stuff. Is there an aftermarket Cast piston that would be cheaper and as good as stock?

Last edited by ScubaruImpreza05; 06-14-2019 at 03:42 PM.
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Old 06-14-2019, 09:00 PM   #20
viper_crazy
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4. Is 'Subaru' Mike Baumer a reliable video source when I start assembling? I will be compiling a step by step document to follow so I do not miss anything, but having a video to give me an idea of how to safely assemble stuff is the next best thing to having someone live there. I have a computer on my work bench, so a video would be awesome to have help guide me.
Yes, he is a good source of information on how to assemble step-by-step a Subaru motor. I would like to point out, however, and recommend you assemble an engine in a clean environment that's easily more controllable than a driveway.... Would hate for you to go through all this work and end up getting some particle in your engine from who knows where and your back to the beginning of this thread.

That aside, the engine assembly itself is basically spot on.
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Old 06-14-2019, 10:08 PM   #21
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Yes, he is a good source of information on how to assemble step-by-step a Subaru motor. I would like to point out, however, and recommend you assemble an engine in a clean environment that's easily more controllable than a driveway.... Would hate for you to go through all this work and end up getting some particle in your engine from who knows where and your back to the beginning of this thread.

That aside, the engine assembly itself is basically spot on.
Yea I did note that and they said something about no sandstorms that day lol. I have an old kitchen and cabinets installed in my garage as my workbench. I wiped down my entire work area before I started and I continue to spot clean as I do things. Hoping to not get a granule in a bearing when I start assembling and have issues righr away.

I just looked at the second motor I'll be rebuilding and all 4 cylinders are the A size. I really don't want to have 2 motors apart at once. I don't have the room and I'd get stuff mixed up I'm sure... But not sure how I'm going to get an 'A' cylinder in good condition for my EJ253 otherwise. I found some beat looking ones on ebay. Otherwise it's $100 for a new one. I still need to measure my other 3 to make sure I don't need more.

Why didn't you guys warn me this would be a headache! /sarcasm
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Old 06-16-2019, 10:40 AM   #22
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Well, did a refresh on one cylinder head. Took 5 hours because of my inexperience. Pulled everything but the cam out, degrease and pressure washed everything, used the air compressor to blow everything out and all water. Lubed up to cam lobes and journal areas with assembly lube. Valve guides are good, none of them have dropped. Valve guide seals were shot, no cracks but were hard like plastic. Replaced all those. Wire brushed the valves, brass wired the seats, then lapped all the valves. Valves are back in, just need to check valve clearances once I get the intake valve rockers cleaned and installed.

As for the block assembly, I think I understand how to measure most things. My only question is do I need to measure the gap between the rod bearings and the crank counterweight? I don't really see anyone do it, just wondering.
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Old 06-16-2019, 12:19 PM   #23
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Well, did a refresh on one cylinder head. Took 5 hours because of my inexperience. Pulled everything but the cam out, degrease and pressure washed everything, used the air compressor to blow everything out and all water. Lubed up to cam lobes and journal areas with assembly lube. Valve guides are good, none of them have dropped. Valve guide seals were shot, no cracks but were hard like plastic. Replaced all those. Wire brushed the valves, brass wired the seats, then lapped all the valves. Valves are back in, just need to check valve clearances once I get the intake valve rockers cleaned and installed.



As for the block assembly, I think I understand how to measure most things. My only question is do I need to measure the gap between the rod bearings and the crank counterweight? I don't really see anyone do it, just wondering.
You don't need to measure that. There is a clearance measurement for the thrust bearing and a clearance for the rod side to side play though. Both are measured with a feeler gauge and are pretty easy to check before assembly.
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Old 06-22-2019, 09:15 AM   #24
ScubaruImpreza05
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Ok good thank you.

To adjust valves, I just need to make sure each valve is unloaded, right? Every tutorial I see on this is with the cylinder head on the block, but both of mine are off but rebuilt. All I need to do is adjust my valve lash and then I'm ready to bolt on when I get the block reassembled. Wondering if I can get that step out of the way so it is one less thing to worry about.
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Old 06-22-2019, 09:17 AM   #25
dev6565
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Ok good thank you.



To adjust valves, I just need to make sure each valve is unloaded, right? Every tutorial I see on this is with the cylinder head on the block, but both of mine are off but rebuilt. All I need to do is adjust my valve lash and then I'm ready to bolt on when I get the block reassembled. Wondering if I can get that step out of the way so it is one less thing to worry about.
Valve lash changes slightly when the head is bolted to the block. So yes you could do it ahead of time but it will be more accurate if you wait to do it until after the heads are torqued on.
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