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Old 09-10-2020, 09:14 AM   #1
AVANTI R5
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Default The Superbattery Code Has Just Been Cracked

The Superbattery Code Has Just Been Cracked


[QUOTE

Ultrafast charging, the Holy Grail of batteries, has been elusive for years. It is one big reason—perhaps the biggest—why electric cars have not taken off the way they should have and the way many have hoped. But now, an international team of researchers has uncovered the secret to superbatteries: ones not just a lot more energy dense than what we currently have, but also capable of delivering an electric charge much faster than existing batteries.

The secret has to do with how electricity is stored in a group of fascinating materials called transition-metal oxides. These compounds, made up of oxygen bound with iron, nickel, zinc, or another transition metal, can store electricity physically, inside themselves, and they can store a lot of it. That is compared to the dominant lithium-ion technology where lithium ions move from anode to cathode (made from the same materials) or change their crystal structure to turn them into energy storage, the University of Texas at Austin explained in a press release.

“For nearly two decades, the research community has been perplexed by these materials’ anomalously high capacities beyond their theoretical limits,” one of the lead authors of the study, Guihua Yu, said. “This work demonstrates the very first experimental evidence to show the extra charge is stored physically inside these materials via space charge storage mechanism.”

That is pretty good news as many prepare for the electric era where energy storage will be a priority. However, there is still quite a long way to go from discovering how superstorage works to putting this discovery into practice, making much denser batteries. In the meantime, others are also pushing the borders in battery energy density.

Later this month, Tesla’s Elon Musk is expected to announce the latest about the company’s so-called million-mile battery. Tesla’s CEO first talked about the superbattery early last year, saying that the company could soon have batteries lasting for over one million miles. At the time, many probably took it as yet another grand promise with less substance than realism requires. Yet later in 2019, a team of researchers from Dalhousie University in Canada published a paper detailing a battery that “should be able to power an electric vehicle for over 1 million miles.”

Many would argue that nobody needs a battery that can last for 1 million miles or several thousand charge-recharge cycles, but if such a battery is indeed developed, it could be instrumental for energy storage solutions that seek to utilize retired EV batteries instead of dumping them in landfills or setting them aside for recycling. Battery Day, which will also be the day of the annual shareholders’ meeting of Tesla, is scheduled for September 22.

And Tesla is not the only one. Speaking of powering—and storing the excess energy—of the future, flow batteries have also staked a solid claim. They are rechargeable like lithium-ion batteries but can last longer. And their energy density can also be increased as a U.S. energy storage startup recently announced. According to StorEn, the flow battery can store up to 35 percent more electricity than a comparable battery with the same volume, and even more impressively, it can last for 15,000 charge-recharge cycles. The company’s battery is pending a patent.
Related: Russian Fuel Oil Is A Hit In The U.S.

And there is more, in a perhaps unlikely place: Europe. Europe has been lagging behind the U.S. in both EV and battery technology development, but it seems it is now beginning to catch up. Last year, one EV startup founded by the grandson of Ferdinand Porsche, the founder of Volkswagen, said it had developed a completely new battery that could charge up to 80 percent in four minutes. A recent report confirms the Piech EV battery can charge super-quickly, at 4 minutes and 40 seconds for an 80 percent charge, and a charge can last for 500 km.

Whether for electric vehicles or energy storage to back solar and wind installations, batteries continue to be a hot area of research. No wonder since the competition in the EV space, if not in storage, is getting pretty intense: just this week, GM said it had struck a partnership with Nikola, a startup that many see as a challenger to Tesla’s electric dominance. Under the terms of the deal, GM will supply Nikola with fuel cell, EV battery, and electric drive technology in exchange for an 11-percent stake in the company.

The race for the electric future is on, and more and more people will want a part in it. More advancements in battery technology are not just likely but virtually a certainty. The only question is how many of them would be able to go from the lab to the market quickly enough to make a difference. This would normally depend on their potential to make a serious enough difference. In the heated space of EV and storage, the success of a new battery tech would also depend on the competitive edge it could offer those who decide to utilize it.
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Old 09-10-2020, 10:23 AM   #2
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Super exciting times at the very least. I just hope we can get some electric equivalent of the pony cars before cars go too far into "hurr durr but YOU didn't pay for our performance subscription app, so now we're going to remove it!" territory. I want to actually be able to own what I forking buy.
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Old 09-11-2020, 06:43 AM   #3
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With such significant funding going into battery tech, I expect substantial improvements over the next 5 to 10 years. I would no be surprised to see up to 1000 mile ranges possible in under 5 years.
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Old 09-12-2020, 10:57 AM   #4
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Been hearing this since the 80s and every few year they say it again. Fisker was claiming they had battery could charge in few minutes fully
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Old 09-12-2020, 11:33 AM   #5
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Tesla build me an electric bicycle or motorcycle please! My ebike is wonderful, but one of these superbatteries sounds incredible!
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Old 09-12-2020, 02:25 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by mhoward1 View Post
With such significant funding going into battery tech, I expect substantial improvements over the next 5 to 10 years. I would no be surprised to see up to 1000 mile ranges possible in under 5 years.
although that would pointless to offer cars with 1000 miles of range, I think selling a car with a true 500 miles of range would be the sweet spot even 400 miles. Then start removing batteries to make electric cars lighter than ICE cars .
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Old 09-12-2020, 03:08 PM   #7
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You use the extra mileage capacity to run the radio, heater step at highway speeds people actually drive while keeping a 500 mile range. I have a buddy with a Tesla that wouldn’t make it to Knoxville from Nashville in July (less than 3 hr drive in a normal car) at 70 mph without a 1 hr stop to recharge.
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Old 09-12-2020, 03:17 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by juanmedina View Post
although that would pointless to offer cars with 1000 miles of range, I think selling a car with a true 500 miles of range would be the sweet spot even 400 miles. Then start removing batteries to make electric cars lighter than ICE cars .
I would go for 1k range .

Honestly crazy range help EV adoption. Maybe something in between, similar charge rate as now with way beyter density? So many areas cant support home charging EVs due to limited power infrastructure or lack of dedicated space (street parking, apartments). There could be a sweet spot where the need for home charging goes away because batteries become more power dense, cheap to produce. All you have to do is charge your car once a month for an couple hours.... I would go for that.

Even if ev batteries can take a crazy charge there will be issues with the supply side. How much power can a EV gas station realisticly get from that area of the grid? There are lots of bottle necks and that will take a lot of time to work through.

Side not: True range varies sooooo much for ev just based off of weather. So much less waste heat to utilize, 500 mile true ev range drops to 300 as soon as it hits 35f and you want your car warm.
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Old 09-12-2020, 03:36 PM   #9
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You use the extra mileage capacity to run the radio, heater step at highway speeds people actually drive while keeping a 500 mile range. I have a buddy with a Tesla that wouldn’t make it to Knoxville from Nashville in July (less than 3 hr drive in a normal car) at 70 mph without a 1 hr stop to recharge.
I have a model 3 performance and I done 700 miles trips about 12 hours going 80mph for most of the trip with two little kids and AC and there is no way a stop will take 1hr unless the supercharger was broken or overloaded. We went from South Carolina to Michigan so we went through Nashville and Knoxville in July to visit my in-laws lol.

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I would go for 1k range .

Honestly crazy range help EV adoption. Maybe something in between, similar charge rate as now with way beyter density? So many areas cant support home charging EVs due to limited power infrastructure or lack of dedicated space (street parking, apartments). There could be a sweet spot where the need for home charging goes away because batteries become more power dense, cheap to produce. All you have to do is charge your car once a month for an couple hours.... I would go for that.

Even if ev batteries can take a crazy charge there will be issues with the supply side. How much power can a EV gas station realisticly get from that area of the grid? There are lots of bottle necks and that will take a lot of time to work through.

Side not: True range varies sooooo much for ev just based off of weather. So much less waste heat to utilize, 500 mile true ev range drops to 300 as soon as it hits 35f and you want your car warm.
When I said true range I meant accounting for temperature changes and something like AC or heat. Newer EV cars with heat pumps get way better range. Also, most gasoline cars cannot even go 500 miles I think the average is something like 410 miles.

Last edited by juanmedina; 09-12-2020 at 03:43 PM.
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Old 09-13-2020, 10:50 PM   #10
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Been hearing this since the 80s and every few year they say it again. Fisker was claiming they had battery could charge in few minutes fully
That’s it’s folks. Close down the battery research. Our current battery tech is just like the 80’s! No progress has been made. None. Nada.


You know what else they didn’t say was possible in the 80’s 20mpg V8’s.

Christ, your dribble has really been exhausted.
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Old 09-14-2020, 09:54 AM   #11
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That’s it’s folks. Close down the battery research. Our current battery tech is just like the 80’s! No progress has been made. None. Nada.


You know what else they didn’t say was possible in the 80’s 20mpg V8’s.

Christ, your dribble has really been exhausted.
Next thing you know they'll claim we'll have a 400 mile EV soon!
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Old 09-14-2020, 10:53 AM   #12
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Next thing you know they'll claim we'll have a 400 mile EV soon!
That’s impossible! If I can’t play Art of War on my iPhone without it dying in an hour, there’s no way an EV vehicle can go 400 miles! Everyone knows coal is the best fuel source for vehicles!
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Old 09-14-2020, 11:00 AM   #13
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Been hearing this since the 80s and every few year they say it again. Fisker was claiming they had battery could charge in few minutes fully

Fisker who?
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Old 09-14-2020, 12:33 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by godfather2112 View Post
That’s it’s folks. Close down the battery research. Our current battery tech is just like the 80’s! No progress has been made. None. Nada.


You know what else they didn’t say was possible in the 80’s 20mpg V8’s.

Christ, your dribble has really been exhausted.
The battery thingy will happen in Iphone or Samsung Galaxy other portable first.
Hydrogen fuel cells will take the power source first in heavy duty use.
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Old 09-14-2020, 05:32 PM   #15
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The battery thingy will happen in Iphone or Samsung Galaxy other portable first.
Hydrogen fuel cells will take the power source first in heavy duty use.
Highly unlikely when you consider the cost of phone now. EV vehicles are leading the way for pushing battery development. You can willfully be ignorant to that fact but it doesn't change the fact.
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Old 09-14-2020, 08:15 PM   #16
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The battery thingy will happen in Iphone or Samsung Galaxy other portable first.
Hydrogen fuel cells will take the power source first in heavy duty use.
I think that battery technology will already be ready for that kind of heavy duty use by the time they get a decent Hydrogen fuel-cell vehicle comes out. Look at Nikola for instance . Daimler seems to be working on a fuel-cell semi.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/09/14/busin...ent/index.html
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