Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Thursday September 20, 2018
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Factory 2.5L Turbo Powertrain (EJ Series Factory 2.5L Turbo)

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads. 
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-17-2018, 04:29 PM   #51
Charlie-III
NASIOC Supporter
 
Member#: 30669
Join Date: Dec 2002
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: USA, North NJ, 07456
Vehicle:
1998 Legacy 2.5GT
Silver Sleeper BK, 5MT

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smoked240s View Post
Funny no one has mentioned the added chance of cracking with heat wrap..

Usually a quality manifold won't crack but I have seen it happen.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsaturn7085 View Post
This is usually an issue of weld quality or materials selection. Go with a good brand and you'll be fine. Have your buddy weld up a Tomei copy... might have some issues.
For a DD, I prefer/recommend a coating. Whether ceramic, JetHot, whatever, I prefer that over a wrap.
Yes, some steel used in a header with a wrap has shown a propensity to crack when used as a DD, depends on the steel used and the application.
I have an original COBB EL header that was coated from new. It has maybe 100K miles in the NE with salt.
Yes it has some rust.
Looking for a head nod from COBB to find a local to replicate in SS with no legal issues.

As a racecar, I have no issues with wrap.
As a DD, a "paint coating" can only help on a wrapped exhaust.
Just my $0.02.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Charlie-III is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Old 08-20-2018, 01:24 AM   #52
brandobot
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 199552
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: California
Vehicle:
2011 STI Hatch

Default

Out of curiosity, does anyone know how hot the surface of the stainless steel sti exhaust header gets vs a wrap over an exhaust header?

Is there any risk of melting the aluminum foil over the wrap if the car is tracked?
brandobot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-20-2018, 12:18 PM   #53
mrsaturn7085
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 375462
Join Date: Dec 2013
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Portland, OR
Vehicle:
2006 Impreza WRX STI
WR Blue

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brandobot View Post
Out of curiosity, does anyone know how hot the surface of the stainless steel sti exhaust header gets vs a wrap over an exhaust header?

Is there any risk of melting the aluminum foil over the wrap if the car is tracked?
Pretty hot.

No.
mrsaturn7085 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2018, 11:47 PM   #54
brandobot
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 199552
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: California
Vehicle:
2011 STI Hatch

Default

How the heck do i use safety wire
brandobot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2018, 12:31 AM   #55
mrsaturn7085
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 375462
Join Date: Dec 2013
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Portland, OR
Vehicle:
2006 Impreza WRX STI
WR Blue

Default

Safety wire pliers and YouTube.
mrsaturn7085 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2018, 12:37 AM   #56
brandobot
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 199552
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: California
Vehicle:
2011 STI Hatch

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsaturn7085 View Post
Safety wire pliers and YouTube.
https://app.box.com/s/b8tifzlolnvitch9p2hatz1bbe68jsvk

Finished the uppipe. Used the tomei titanium wrap, secured by the metal ties. Then wrapped with the aluminum foil tape, then used safety tie all around.

Took me a good half hour to figure out how to use the safety wire. I was trying to wrap the entire up pipe with one long string of wire, then tighten it. Ended up getting 8 separate strands of wire and tightening one section at a time.
brandobot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2018, 01:33 AM   #57
oaklandish_WRX
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 267339
Join Date: Dec 2010
Chapter/Region: BAIC
Location: Ostinato Rigore
Vehicle:
2002 0[[XXXXoXXXX]]0
MBP LongRoof

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brandobot View Post
https://app.box.com/s/b8tifzlolnvitch9p2hatz1bbe68jsvk

Finished the uppipe. Used the tomei titanium wrap, secured by the metal ties. Then wrapped with the aluminum foil tape, then used safety tie all around.

Took me a good half hour to figure out how to use the safety wire. I was trying to wrap the entire up pipe with one long string of wire, then tighten it. Ended up getting 8 separate strands of wire and tightening one section at a time.
oaklandish_WRX is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2018, 02:04 PM   #58
mrsaturn7085
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 375462
Join Date: Dec 2013
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Portland, OR
Vehicle:
2006 Impreza WRX STI
WR Blue

Default

You did it pretty well... now cut all those wires loose and do it again

Seriously, watch some YouTube videos showing you how to use safety wire and your hands will thank you in the future. One single loop around per wire (and tighter than shown in your first try!), then twist about twice the length you did in the photo, and fold the loose end back underneath itself. If not folded properly, those loose ends will absolutely piece anything and everything you hold dear anytime you work around the exhaust in the future.

Buy a good set of lock/safety wire pliers and these will take care of the tension of the wire around the aluminum tape (again, it is much too loose in the photo). Also note that you don't want to go so tight that you tear the aluminum.

Remember, safety wire is NOT to enhance the retention of a fastener but rather to keep it from going elsewhere should the retention fail. I realize the lines are a little blurry there (especially in this project, where safety wire is not being used in it's usual manner), but think of it this way - the torque/threads/fastener/locking agent itself are the primary retention on a ring gear bolt - should they fail, safety wire is only there to keep the loose fastener from destroying your entire transmission before you are able to remove it and fix the issue. To translate it to this project - high temp. tape has adhesive as the primary retention; should it fail, your safety wire is the back-up plan.

Here's a good video (just apply the core stuff to your project):


I'll say it one last time before you destroy your hands/arms/clothing - don't forget to bend the tail at the end:


Last edited by mrsaturn7085; 08-22-2018 at 02:15 PM.
mrsaturn7085 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2018, 12:02 AM   #59
brandobot
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 199552
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: California
Vehicle:
2011 STI Hatch

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsaturn7085 View Post
You did it pretty well... now cut all those wires loose and do it again

Seriously, watch some YouTube videos showing you how to use safety wire and your hands will thank you in the future. One single loop around per wire (and tighter than shown in your first try!), then twist about twice the length you did in the photo, and fold the loose end back underneath itself. If not folded properly, those loose ends will absolutely piece anything and everything you hold dear anytime you work around the exhaust in the future.

Buy a good set of lock/safety wire pliers and these will take care of the tension of the wire around the aluminum tape (again, it is much too loose in the photo). Also note that you don't want to go so tight that you tear the aluminum.

Remember, safety wire is NOT to enhance the retention of a fastener but rather to keep it from going elsewhere should the retention fail. I realize the lines are a little blurry there (especially in this project, where safety wire is not being used in it's usual manner), but think of it this way - the torque/threads/fastener/locking agent itself are the primary retention on a ring gear bolt - should they fail, safety wire is only there to keep the loose fastener from destroying your entire transmission before you are able to remove it and fix the issue. To translate it to this project - high temp. tape has adhesive as the primary retention; should it fail, your safety wire is the back-up plan.

Here's a good video (just apply the core stuff to your project):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OwFjUX6SaY8

I'll say it one last time before you destroy your hands/arms/clothing - don't forget to bend the tail at the end:

I used the safety pliers and broke 2 of the safety wires by tightening too tight. Once I found that point right before it breaks, I began stopping the tightening process when I felt all the extra tension, then began manually twisting another 2-3 turns with pliers manually. I honestly do not see how it can get any tighter than this. (uploaded 2 more photos)

I will try doing them with a single loop instead to see if I can get it tighter that way.

https://app.box.com/s/7usp3n8cm1un8tjrsi0oht2bhgjxdqq7

https://app.box.com/s/hd153b8o2fxfderawdelipmhqdobgsw0

Last edited by brandobot; 08-23-2018 at 03:00 AM.
brandobot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2018, 01:41 PM   #60
mrsaturn7085
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 375462
Join Date: Dec 2013
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Portland, OR
Vehicle:
2006 Impreza WRX STI
WR Blue

Default

While I would really recommend single loops to get the tension action to work like it should, for this use, those look fine. Your tails will be short if you leave them as-is and fold them in, but I highly recommend turning them inward unless you want to find out how bad a tetanus shot is somewhere in the future when you need to work around the exhaust and forget about these being here. Speaking from experience, they always tend to find a way of going into the most painful place imaginable such as the web between fingers or underneath a fingernail... and consider how fast your hand is moving when you finally break the torque on an exhaust bolt.
mrsaturn7085 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2018, 06:54 PM   #61
brandobot
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 199552
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: California
Vehicle:
2011 STI Hatch

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrsaturn7085 View Post
While I would really recommend single loops to get the tension action to work like it should, for this use, those look fine. Your tails will be short if you leave them as-is and fold them in, but I highly recommend turning them inward unless you want to find out how bad a tetanus shot is somewhere in the future when you need to work around the exhaust and forget about these being here. Speaking from experience, they always tend to find a way of going into the most painful place imaginable such as the web between fingers or underneath a fingernail... and consider how fast your hand is moving when you finally break the torque on an exhaust bolt.
Understood. I will get them tucked underneath. Thanks!
brandobot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-28-2018, 05:42 PM   #62
brandobot
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 199552
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: California
Vehicle:
2011 STI Hatch

Default

Local independent Subaru shop is doing my trans and diff fluid and advised against running wrap. Said I should be checking my car for leaks before EVERY drive and warned about how others' have had their cars burned.

I've spent countless hours reading about wraps and fire risk, and the consensus is that the risk is low as long as you properly maintain your car, you should be fine. However, hearing what the shop mechanic said is making me paranoid again.

I honestly have not felt a difference of performance between wrapping and unwrapped. (I had the Tomei equal length header unwrapped previously to wrapping it from the previous owner of the car). I generally don't go crazy on the STI (I have a '15 Corvette and a supercharged Lotus if I want to have fun), and this car is mainly for long drives to snow country or my utility vehicle when the wife wants to pick up large pieces of furniture or plants.

Is the radiant heat from unwrapped stainless headers enough to cause problems to the surround areas such as wiring, gaskets, etc..?
brandobot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-29-2018, 12:53 PM   #63
mrsaturn7085
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 375462
Join Date: Dec 2013
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Portland, OR
Vehicle:
2006 Impreza WRX STI
WR Blue

Default

The mechanic is parroting what he has read online and formed his personal opinion about. The information in this thread regarding a fire barrier being suggest is good advice.

Unwrapped exhaust radiant heat will wear the valve cover gaskets quicker, more than anything. It can also damage the RH engine mount.

If you do back to back pulls on a dyno using a wrapped and unwrapped manifold you will see a difference, especially if you take the time to re-tune the boost control.
mrsaturn7085 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2018 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2017, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.