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Old 07-12-2018, 07:36 PM   #426
SlickWRX
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Thanks and I understand the concern. The bottle says take them every six hours as needed. I really only need them when I sleep because I can only sleep on my sides and I have incisions with pins and plates on both sides. I've only used one every night before bed for the past 5 days. I'll take an Advil PM tonight and I might be a little uncomfortable at times but I will be fine. I can't wait for them to take the cast off Monday that is the major cause of my discomfort and pain.

I was trolling a little bit because the OT was saying I should double up on eating the pills and drinking while doing so and even snorting them.

https://forums.nasioc.com/forums/sho...e#post45694592
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Old 07-12-2018, 07:47 PM   #427
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlickWRX View Post
I was trolling a little bit because the OT was saying I should double up on eating the pills and drinking while doing so and even snorting them.

https://forums.nasioc.com/forums/sho...e#post45694592
OT only knows a handful of addicts so they're hoping that they can be there to witness your descent into prostituting yourself.
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Old 07-12-2018, 07:56 PM   #428
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Originally Posted by VpointVick View Post
OT only knows a handful of addicts so they're hoping that they can be there to witness your descent into prostituting yourself.
I'll show up with my wolf t-shirt.
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Old 07-13-2018, 04:00 AM   #429
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SlickWRX View Post
Thanks and I understand the concern. The bottle says take them every six hours as needed. I really only need them when I sleep because I can only sleep on my sides and I have incisions with pins and plates on both sides. I've only used one every night before bed for the past 5 days. I'll take an Advil PM tonight and I might be a little uncomfortable at times but I will be fine. I can't wait for them to take the cast off Monday that is the major cause of my discomfort and pain.

I was trolling a little bit because the OT was saying I should double up on eating the pills and drinking while doing so and even snorting them.

https://forums.nasioc.com/forums/sho...e#post45694592

1. That would kill one, not get them addicted
2. JOKES
3. I get to make addiction jokes.
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Old 07-13-2018, 09:18 AM   #430
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Originally Posted by VpointVick View Post
This is a dangerous attitude.
"This stuff doesn't seem addictive. That won't happen to me."

In literal epidemic.

Last edited by delongedoug; 07-13-2018 at 10:54 AM. Reason: holy typo, batman
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Old 07-13-2018, 10:51 AM   #431
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Originally Posted by delongedoug View Post
"This stuff doesn't seem attictive. That won't happen to me."

In literal epidemic.
Right?!
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Old 07-13-2018, 06:16 PM   #432
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It's heartbreakingly bad where I am at (Baltimore). We're arguably a heroin (consumption and distribution) capital of the US, although fentanyl is pretty high up there too, and use of its analogues are expected to increase (carfentanil is of particular concern.) Overdose from excessive acetaminophen consumption as a consequence of taking drugs that contain it plus a narcotic are also quite common, although I've observed statistics that suggest heroin overdoses seems to be greater within the city, where as prescription pharmaceutical overdoses seem to be more common as you get to outward towards more rural areas. One recurrent theme seems to be that a large portion of heroin users started using opioids for some type of legitimate medical purpose, and somewhere along the way the **** spiraled out of control. Naloxone training and distribution programs are ongoing at several levels. The extreme poverty here, ongoing crack and murder epidemics, and wobbly relations between community members and first responders/policymakers certainly do not help the situation. I think the issue is going to continue to get worse until we see a pretty substantial paradigm shift that not only extends to how we view and handle substance abuse prevention and treatment, but supplementary things as well, such as poverty, generalized mental health, community policing, and research for newer treatments for acute and chronic pain. But as I'm not an expert here, that's just my personal opinion.
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Old 07-14-2018, 02:02 AM   #433
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Quote:
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The initial difference is prescription drugs aren't illegal, crack is. Therefore you get more sympathy. While I agree with Dave I also disagree with the intent in many cases of people becoming addicted. Not all opioid addicts were seeking a high.
You're such an unabashed piece of **** it's honestly impressive how little self awareness you have.

Maybe you should post some more selfies in this thread.
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Old 07-14-2018, 02:03 AM   #434
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Everyone must measure up on BacDoc's warped ****ing scale of morality before he and he alone decided you are worthy of living, let alone receiving sympathy or assistance.
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Old 07-14-2018, 02:17 AM   #435
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Originally Posted by get_schwifty View Post
It's heartbreakingly bad where I am at (Baltimore). We're arguably a heroin (consumption and distribution) capital of the US, although fentanyl is pretty high up there too, and use of its analogues are expected to increase (carfentanil is of particular concern.) Overdose from excessive acetaminophen consumption as a consequence of taking drugs that contain it plus a narcotic are also quite common, although I've observed statistics that suggest heroin overdoses seems to be greater within the city, where as prescription pharmaceutical overdoses seem to be more common as you get to outward towards more rural areas. One recurrent theme seems to be that a large portion of heroin users started using opioids for some type of legitimate medical purpose, and somewhere along the way the **** spiraled out of control. Naloxone training and distribution programs are ongoing at several levels. The extreme poverty here, ongoing crack and murder epidemics, and wobbly relations between community members and first responders/policymakers certainly do not help the situation. I think the issue is going to continue to get worse until we see a pretty substantial paradigm shift that not only extends to how we view and handle substance abuse prevention and treatment, but supplementary things as well, such as poverty, generalized mental health, community policing, and research for newer treatments for acute and chronic pain. But as I'm not an expert here, that's just my personal opinion.
This is not true.

They do make up a significant chunk of addicts, but they are by no means the majority.

Quote:
U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions recently announced a new plan by the DEA to further tighten production quotas for opioid pain medication as a step in the fight against opioid abuse and addiction.

The proposal appears in the Federal Register with the following explanation:

“Users may be initiated into a life of substance abuse and dependency after first obtaining these drugs from their health care providers…. Once ensnared, dependency on potent and dangerous street drugs may ensue. About 80% of heroin users first misused prescription opioids. Thus, it may be inferred that current users of heroin and fentanyl largely entered the gateway as part of the populations who previously misused prescription opioids."

This is not a new claim by the DEA. In its 360 Strategy: Diversion Control, the DEA plainly states, “The connection between prescription opioid abuse and heroin use is clear, with 80% of new heroin abusers starting their opioid addiction by misusing prescription medications.”

Where does the 80% figure come from?

The DEA cites the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) as its source, while NIDA in turn references a 2013 study by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA).

SAMHSA pooled a decade's worth of data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health and found that “four out of five recent heroin initiates (79.5 percent) previously used NMPR (nonmedical use of pain relievers)."

But the SAMHSA study did not examine how many of those heroin users had a valid prescription for opioids, so the DEA claim about users "first obtaining these drugs from their health care providers" is untrue. SAMHSA also notes that "the literature on transition from NMPR to heroin use is relatively sparse" and that the "vast majority" of people who abuse opioid medication never actually progress to heroin.

The abuse of opioid medication by heroin users also varies considerably by time, region and demographics -- so must users don't fit neatly into the 80% claim. A review article in The New England Journal of Medicine reports that prior nonmedical use of opioid medication was found in 50% of young adult heroin users in Ohio, in 86% of heroin users in New York and Los Angeles, and in 40%, 39%, and 70% of heroin users in San Diego, Seattle, and New York respectively.

Conversely, studies on the medical use of opioid analgesics show very low rates of opioid addiction. A review in the journal Addiction concluded that “The available evidence suggests that opioid analgesics for chronic pain conditions are not associated with a major risk for developing dependence.”

A 2016 article in The New England Journal of Medicine by Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of NIDA, also explains that “addiction occurs in only a small percentage of persons who are exposed to opioids—even among those with preexisting vulnerabilities.”
The problem is more the wealth of extra pills leftover than it is the person they are prescribed to becoming addicted. The Mom who gets pills after the surgery isn't at as much of a risk for addiction as her 16 year old son who borrows a few Vicodin from the medicine cabinet.

The idea that painkillers are bad and doctors have become drug pushers is being propagated by people who hated doctors and pills before Oxycontin was even invented.
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Old 07-14-2018, 10:14 AM   #436
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My girl friend last another friend to this stuff recently. He was a recovering addict and had some medical emergency. They prescribed him pain pills, and I guess that set off some sort of trigger and he went to seek out the stuff on the street. It had been laced with something and he ended up ODing.
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Old 07-14-2018, 12:31 PM   #437
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 042 View Post
This is not true.

They do make up a significant chunk of addicts, but they are by no means the majority.



The problem is more the wealth of extra pills leftover than it is the person they are prescribed to becoming addicted. The Mom who gets pills after the surgery isn't at as much of a risk for addiction as her 16 year old son who borrows a few Vicodin from the medicine cabinet.

The idea that painkillers are bad and doctors have become drug pushers is being propagated by people who hated doctors and pills before Oxycontin was even invented.
Rereading my sentence, I feel I worded that poorly, oversimplified a complex phenomenon, and for that I apologize. I should have made it more clear that I was basing that statement largely off of empirical observation (and did not intend to imply it as a factual statement.) My noting of "a large portion" was improper choice of wording, and I should have probably not implied this as a generalization given other factors were at play. Nonetheless, I miss these people immensely.

I do not wish to imply that opioid medications are unconditionally harmful - to the contrary, proper usage has prevented absolutely God-awful suffering that no one should ever have to experience. And the minority of doctors using improper prescribing/monitoring practices probably receive disproportionate media coverage. But there are definitely still some ongoing systematic issues, in my opinion.
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Old 07-14-2018, 12:48 PM   #438
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When I am in Staten Island, NY - it is bad. Up by me in Northeast PA, it's just a lot of drunks.

Someone I hung out with all the time through my 20s and early 30s and was a best friend died of an OD. I thought they were clean. Monday evening we were laughing our asses off joking around and Wednesday he was dead.

I've seen people passed out in SI, and there are lots of news articles. It's shocking how many people use.
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Old 07-14-2018, 03:25 PM   #439
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I think everyone that did drugs in the 60's has relapsed in the last 10 years. That is a big market
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Old 07-15-2018, 04:25 AM   #440
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Quote:
Originally Posted by get_schwifty View Post
Rereading my sentence, I feel I worded that poorly, oversimplified a complex phenomenon, and for that I apologize. I should have made it more clear that I was basing that statement largely off of empirical observation (and did not intend to imply it as a factual statement.) My noting of "a large portion" was improper choice of wording, and I should have probably not implied this as a generalization given other factors were at play. Nonetheless, I miss these people immensely.

I do not wish to imply that opioid medications are unconditionally harmful - to the contrary, proper usage has prevented absolutely God-awful suffering that no one should ever have to experience. And the minority of doctors using improper prescribing/monitoring practices probably receive disproportionate media coverage. But there are definitely still some ongoing systematic issues, in my opinion.
At this point it's fair to say that the over prescription and drug monitoring concerns are being dealt with aggressively and there are not going to be many opportunities to scam pills and doctor shop in the future.

I probably wrapped up some of my response to BacDoc's post in my reply to yours and that wasn't fair. But as he without any hesitation admits, some people don't want to treat everyone, they just want to help the people they deem worthy. Splitting the addicts into two groups just doesn't serve any functional purpose. They are both in need of similar treatment programs even though what led them to use drugs may be entirely different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ken-Ohki View Post
I think everyone that did drugs in the 60's has relapsed in the last 10 years. That is a big market
Probably even higher by now.

Quote:
The percentage of American 50- to 59-year-olds who reported having abused illicit or prescription drugs during the past year more than doubled, from 2.7 percent to 6.2 percent, between 2002 and 2009. Not coincidentally, by the end of that period baby boomers—the generation born between 1946 and 1964—had filled out that age cohort. Baby boomers' histories of illicit drug use, and their relatively tolerant attitudes toward it, along with the fact that they now comprise nearly 30 percent of the Nation’s population, have raised the stakes on understanding and responding effectively to drug abuse among older adults.
Literally every negative attribute of millennials can be traced back to Baby Boomers.
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Old 07-15-2018, 09:43 AM   #441
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There is a methadone treatment center over by a jail in Boston so the area is now called “Methadone Mile.” The Director told me they have clients driving there from Easterm MA, S NH, and RI.

We drive our kids to school through it and I consider it one of the advantages of raising kids in the city: they see first hand just how awful life is as an addict.
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Old 07-16-2018, 08:07 AM   #442
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Originally Posted by Cuddles View Post
My girl friend last another friend to this stuff recently. He was a recovering addict and had some medical emergency. They prescribed him pain pills, and I guess that set off some sort of trigger and he went to seek out the stuff on the street. It had been laced with something and he ended up ODing.


Jessie's Law is supposed to build a database for this to red flag past addicts.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Garandman View Post
There is a methadone treatment center over by a jail in Boston so the area is now called “Methadone Mile.” The Director told me they have clients driving there from Easterm MA, S NH, and RI.

We drive our kids to school through it and I consider it one of the advantages of raising kids in the city: they see first hand just how awful life is as an addict.
Our Meth clinincs were dumping homeless people from different states onto our streets. They bring these people in for 3-4 week programs, get paid, and dump them out the front door.
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Old 07-16-2018, 08:14 AM   #443
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https://www.bostonmagazine.com/healt...ethadone-mile/

CN: Boston Mayor promotes day shelter to get people off the streets and into treatment, is now complaining that addicts are acting like addicts.

There is a McDonalds across the street that might be more depressing.
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Old 07-16-2018, 08:54 AM   #444
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"At one point, police say there were more than a dozen people at the back of the building waiting to get in."


http://www.wsaz.com/content/news/Pol...487896061.html
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Old 07-16-2018, 09:23 AM   #445
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My wife, prior to her back surgery, was on max dose opiates, for months. Was barely helping, but absolutely necessary. Only thing left that the doctors could prescribe, with greater effect, was fentanyl.

After back surgery, she’s not had any, and that was two years ago.

If her situation happened, today, she could not get the level of pain medication she was on and required because of dickhead drug abusers and/or a mis-guided attempt to blame opioid prescriptions for drug abuse. No sympathy from me for illegitimate street-drug sucking low-lifes. Total sympathy for legitimate (documented) patients that are suffering in agony, more-so-now, because of street-life trash.
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Old 07-16-2018, 10:43 AM   #446
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NOTE: The artist wasn't charged with a felony, they were charged with a misdemeanor.
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Old 07-16-2018, 11:18 AM   #447
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cuddles View Post
My girl friend last another friend to this stuff recently. He was a recovering addict and had some medical emergency. They prescribed him pain pills, and I guess that set off some sort of trigger and he went to seek out the stuff on the street. It had been laced with something and he ended up ODing.
Check out the video Pleasure Unwoven, and you might see what happened. In some people there is literally a broken switch in their brains, and it sees whatever as really high on the hierarchy of needs. You can't see the entire video, but the important information is there. I've mentioned it before. That was me, and watching that, and learning about that model is what made me stop. That said, the video was made to have some entertainment and for whatever reason that turns some people off.
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Old Yesterday, 01:24 AM   #448
SlickWRX
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Originally Posted by chapstien View Post
1. That would kill one, not get them addicted
2. JOKES
3. I get to make addiction jokes.
Got stitches and cast removed Monday. Doc says I don't need hydrocodone anymore and doesn't plan to refill. Went home and flushed bottle. I was actually feeling nausea at times and that went away too.
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Old Yesterday, 06:13 AM   #449
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Way to go now you got fish addicted to opiates.
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Old Yesterday, 07:46 AM   #450
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Originally Posted by shiplemw View Post
Way to go now you got fish addicted to opiates.
Mussels off the coast of Seattle test positive for opioids

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/mussels...e-puget-sound/
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