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Old 05-11-2023, 03:37 PM   #1
Snow Drift
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Default Subaru Promises 4 Crossover EVs in the US - 2026+

https://electrek.co/2023/05/11/subar...ossover-ev-us/
  • 4 all-electric crossovers by 2026
  • Subaru Japanese plants to build 400,000 EVs per year by 2028
  • 40% of global sales to be electric by 2030
  • All sales to be electric by early 2030s

Quote:
Originally Posted by Electrek
Under its former chief, Subaru said it would not build EVs in the US because it can’t compete with McDonalds’ $20 starting wage. That appears to still be the case under the Osaki era, but that doesn’t mean new Subaru EVs won’t hit the US market. According to comments from the new CEO this week, we can expect to see four all-electric crossovers by 2026.

Subaru to build 400,000 EVs per year by 2028

Lots of news coming out of Subaru HQ this week. Today, the company shared its financial results for its 2023 fiscal year end on March 31. The company is reporting a near tripling of operating profits compared to a year prior, led by steady sales in Subaru’s key market – the US.

Following today’s report, Subaru CEO Atsushi Osaki laid out the Japanese automaker’s electrification plans going forward, and they’re encouraging. Osaki explained that Subaru will add an additional dedicated EV assembly line to it Oizumi plant in Japan in 2027, adding annual production capacity for another 200,000 vehicles.

Oizumi will compliment a separate EV line at the automaker’s nearby Yajima plant that will also deliver 200,000 EVs a year from around 2026. Combined, Subaru expects to be cranking out as many as 400,000 EVs in Japan per year by 2028.

Even before EV production has completely ramped up overseas, Subaru is planning to be building and delivering new, all-electric models to US consumers. According to Osaki, all four of the EVs that are expected to roll out before the end of 2026 should reach the US market.

The new CEO did also confirm that those models will be built entirely in Japan to start, so hopes of garnering any federal tax incentives stateside have already been shot down. Instead, Subaru hopes its EVs can entice US consumers based on lease incentives… Well that and brand loyalty alone. Per outgoing Subaru CEO Tomomi Nakamura:

I wonder if American consumers choose their cars solely based on tax breaks. Our US customers are quality customers. We have a higher ratio of customers buying Subarus with cash, and we also have low loan and lease rates. We also keep our incentives at low levels. We will try not to rely only on the subsidy program.

Looking ahead, Subaru says it plans to source the batteries to support its EV transition with the help of partner Toyota. The automaker now aims to have at least 40% of its global sales come from BEVs by the end of the decade and intends to offer an entirely electric lineup by the “early 2030s.”
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Old 05-11-2023, 04:36 PM   #2
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YAY said no-one.
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Old 05-11-2023, 04:37 PM   #3
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They’ll either go bankrupt or pull out before it’s too late and end up on GM 2008 life alert once they’ve pissed away all that money on EVs. Total waste.
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Old 05-11-2023, 04:47 PM   #4
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Or they'll be take over by Toyota, just like Nissan bought Mitsubishi Car division.
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Old 05-11-2023, 05:23 PM   #5
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get ready for the STI CUV.
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Old 05-11-2023, 05:38 PM   #6
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I promise ill do it tomorrow.
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Old 05-11-2023, 05:39 PM   #7
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Really cool. EV STI is going to be bonkers.
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Old 05-11-2023, 06:37 PM   #8
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Forester EV
Outback EV
Crosstrek EV
New lifted EV model

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Old 05-11-2023, 07:29 PM   #9
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Derphawk predicted all this back in 1999.
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Old 05-11-2023, 07:29 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by chanomatik View Post
Forester EV
Outback EV
Crosstrek EV
Ascent EV model
Fixed
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Old 05-11-2023, 07:30 PM   #11
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get ready for the STI CUV.



They're bringing back the Forester STi?
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Old 05-11-2023, 07:44 PM   #12
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Fixed
I knew I forgot one!

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Old 05-11-2023, 09:04 PM   #13
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I'm also going to be selling 4 crossover EVs 2026+.

And why not? I've got the same number of electric vehicle platforms and battery agreements as Subaru.

Everybody remember Subaru's 2005 B5 TPH concept? TPH stood for Turbo Parallel Hybrid. They didn't even bother with that.


The styling was a bust.. but the drivetrain could have been a hit. Nah, lets double down on CVTs and smaller displacement NA engines for the North American market.
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Old 05-12-2023, 01:24 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Calamity Jesus View Post
I'm also going to be selling 4 crossover EVs 2026+.

And why not? I've got the same number of electric vehicle platforms and battery agreements as Subaru.

Everybody remember Subaru's 2005 B5 TPH concept? TPH stood for Turbo Parallel Hybrid. They didn't even bother with that.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RvIIJCHP-E

The styling was a bust.. but the drivetrain could have been a hit. Nah, lets double down on CVTs and smaller displacement NA engines for the North American market.

I totally agree. The way it was set up, it seemed like it could be paired to any of their engine setups. But, perhaps that trans that was on it didn't actually give them the numbers it "should" have? But, then, the way it was set up, it "should" have been able to work with a CVT as well, eh? What I wouldn't give to have free reign on all the R&D and prototypes they've come up with over the years. They had a DI engine paired with a CVT(non-Lineartronic) in the middle 90s. Look how long it took to get them on the road. My only question at this moment about this news, is are they "Subaru" designs? Or more Toyota. Not talking about the electric drivetrain. I'm talking the rest. Learning the Solterra has been "stupid" cause most of what I need to know to help customers is a subscription.....
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Old 05-15-2023, 03:14 PM   #15
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not all EV's are bad...and imo instant torque is a way better feeling then ICE engines slowly response.

still waiting for a car manufacture to get it right before i change over to EV...also infrastructure as well.
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Old 05-15-2023, 03:15 PM   #16
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not all EV's are bad...and imo instant torque is a way better feeling then ICE engines slowly response.

still waiting for a car manufacture to get it right before i change over to EV...also infrastructure as well.
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Old 05-19-2023, 10:08 AM   #17
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For me, 15% doing mfr right and 85% waiting for the infrastructure to be reliable (no charge points down when going to charge), as labeled (charge speeds indicated on charger are what you get, i.e. 87, 91, 93 octane - charger says 150, you get 150, not *up to* 150 - slower just because someone else is charging, etc...), and plentiful, not just on way points/highways between stops.
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Old 05-19-2023, 11:16 AM   #18
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For me, 15% doing mfr right and 85% waiting for the infrastructure to be reliable (no charge points down when going to charge), as labeled (charge speeds indicated on charger are what you get, i.e. 87, 91, 93 octane - charger says 150, you get 150, not *up to* 150 - slower just because someone else is charging, etc...), and plentiful, not just on way points/highways between stops.
150 is the max. The car can't handle 150 kW all the time. So, at a low SOC, when the batteries are warm, you may get 150 kW and then it tapers off. It's like filling a glass of water from the tap, you have to slow down the flow as you get closer to the top.

Of course, you also have to contend with sharing, unless the stall doesn't do that (Tesla v3 Superchargers).

Improvements are coming. The early Tesla stalls were 72 kW or 120 kW, today you can get 250 kW and the new v4 units are up to 615 kW.
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Old 05-19-2023, 12:03 PM   #19
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150 is the max. The car can't handle 150 kW all the time. So, at a low SOC, when the batteries are warm, you may get 150 kW and then it tapers off. It's like filling a glass of water from the tap, you have to slow down the flow as you get closer to the top.

Of course, you also have to contend with sharing, unless the stall doesn't do that (Tesla v3 Superchargers).

Improvements are coming. The early Tesla stalls were 72 kW or 120 kW, today you can get 250 kW and the new v4 units are up to 615 kW.
Yes, many cars ramp charge capability, well aware but that's on the car/mfr.

What I'm mostly talking about is the car should be the limiting factor in charge speed, not the charger. If a 300kwh capable car is in prime charging zone where its plugged into a 300kwh charger, the charger shouldn't be running at anything less than the max the car can take, not acting like a crimped water hose. Charger should be able to put out what the car is requesting up to the MAX of the charger (what I mean by max of the charger is a 300kwh capable car being plugged into a 150kwh charger, no duh, you're not getting 300, but it should be at 150). And many chargers out there, especially if shared, produce much less than advertised, and less than the car is requesting.

Last edited by KC; 05-19-2023 at 12:08 PM.
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Old 05-19-2023, 12:41 PM   #20
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Quote:
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Yes, many cars ramp charge capability, well aware but that's on the car/mfr.

What I'm mostly talking about is the car should be the limiting factor in charge speed, not the charger. If a 300kwh capable car is in prime charging zone where its plugged into a 300kwh charger, the charger shouldn't be running at anything less than the max the car can take, not acting like a crimped water hose. Charger should be able to put out what the car is requesting up to the MAX of the charger (what I mean by max of the charger is a 300kwh capable car being plugged into a 150kwh charger, no duh, you're not getting 300, but it should be at 150). And many chargers out there, especially if shared, produce much less than advertised, and less than the car is requesting.
I get your point in a vacuum, but there are too many variables. The biggest variable that needs to be worked on is charger maintenance. So, if they are advertised at 150 kW, they should be capable and not broken or limited.

Shared stalls are not an issue for modern DC chargers. But, yes, that should be resolved.

Outside of those, the other variables are based on your car. Temperature, state of charge, manufacturer charging curve, etc.
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Old 05-19-2023, 12:48 PM   #21
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The biggest variable that needs to be worked on is charger maintenance. So, if they are advertised at 150 kW, they should be capable and not broken or limited.
[finger to nose] Bingo. Too many non tesla chargers right now cannot put out what they should, or, just cannot even turn on/enable to charge, take payment, etc...

They need to be as reliable as, and fixed as fast as, gas pumps. That's the standard right now. Yes, I know some pumps go slower/faster than others (and some break). That point is not lost on me... yet, they are identified and fixed in a very, VERY timely fashion.

Right now, it's like the charger mfrs are just getting paid to make them and install them, because gov't grants (which gas stations do not have, how's that for equality/equity?) But maintenance? How's that going? It's not (or, slowly - it's not a zero sum).
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Old 05-19-2023, 12:55 PM   #22
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(which gas stations do not have, how's that for equality/equity?)
Don't even start man... billions of our dollars go to the oil/gas industry every year...

I can't really speak to the maintenance, I have only used a couple of publicly accessible chargers and they've all worked every time I've used them. 99.9% of the time I charge at home or work with a charger that I maintain. It's pretty cool to never need to stop somewhere for a fill/charge.
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Old 05-19-2023, 01:47 PM   #23
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If the charger decreases its rate when others around it are being used I would say that is infrastructure, not the charger. If the power is not supplied to the charger you can't expect it to transfer it to the car.

There are four chargers in a Walgreens parking lot by my house. They never changed the transformer supplying the store. Just tapped right into the existing supply. I rarely see them used anymore. I think people jumped on them then saw that it took too long. Don't know for sure but, kVA is kVA.

I hooked a fire hose to my faucet at home, guess what happened?

Peace,

Greg
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Old 05-19-2023, 02:18 PM   #24
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If the charger decreases its rate when others around it are being used I would say that is infrastructure, not the charger. If the power is not supplied to the charger you can't expect it to transfer it to the car.

There are four chargers in a Walgreens parking lot by my house. They never changed the transformer supplying the store. Just tapped right into the existing supply. I rarely see them used anymore. I think people jumped on them then saw that it took too long. Don't know for sure but, kVA is kVA.

I hooked a fire hose to my faucet at home, guess what happened?

Peace,

Greg
Yes, it is by design. Not a malfunction. However, it is annoying for users and is not an issue for v3+ Tesla Superchargers.

For older Tesla Superchargers, there are pairs of stalls.

1A 1B
2A 2B
3A 3B
...You get the idea.

Both 1A and 1B each represent a stall with a plug. However, both stalls are tied to the same output. So, the max that both can output is 150 kW. The flow of energy is based on need/arrival. If one is in use, then it can in theory receive the full 150 kW. If two are in use, at the same time, with the same State of Charge, then it is split evenly. If one has been charging for awhile and is at 80% SOC, and a new car plugs in, with a low state of charge, then the 1st receives 50 kW and the new one gets 100 kW (I am making that % up, but it is balanced based on SOC). This is possible bc the first car can't use a lot kW at that high a SOC. If someone arrives after you, your power is not reduced if you can use it, they get less kW until you cannot use the majority of it. This all happens in the background, without your intervention.

That is why it is proper etiquette to not use a paired stall (if you can help it). You will typically see Supercharger locations with cars parked away from each other to prevent this.

Now, updated v3 stalls (250 kW) are not paired, so this is not an issue. Nor are old school 72 kW Urban chargers.
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Old 05-19-2023, 02:56 PM   #25
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Don't even start man... billions of our dollars go to the oil/gas industry every year...
Sure. However, I don't see it on my oil bill, like I see the itemized "fees" on the electric bill towards the infrastructure, ev rebates, etc...

And then you say, "But that's what taxes at the gas pump are for... "

And then I reply, "Yeah hence the money going to the oil companies, but not itemized... instead it's lump sum. But then if I don't buy gas, I don't have to pay taxes that go towards it, right? I can't NOT buy electricity, and if I had solar, in this backwards ass state, I can't use it myself, it goes into the grid, and I still have to pull out of the grid via net metering and STILL charged those taxes."

Don't get ME started!
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