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Old 02-25-2021, 02:19 AM   #1
Mymomsoutbackxt
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 522441
Join Date: Feb 2021
Location: SLC, UT
Vehicle:
2007 OBXT
Pearl White

Default How to Remove a Subaru EJ Engine for Dummies

Over the last few weeks I've been working on replacing my shortblock in my 2007 OBXT. This would be my first engine pull. My cousin, who has pulled and rebuilt countless Subie Engines and I wrote this writeup on everything you need to do when pulling the engine. A lot of stuff is very redundant or obvious, but as the title says, this is for engine pulling virgins who might need all the little extra tips. We wrote this to apply to all EJ Cars, NA or Turbo, MT or AT, so please enjoy, and add any tips you feel would help!

Overall, removing a subaru block is very easy. Slightly time ocnsuming the first time, but not rocket science. I'd label EVERY hose/wire you disconnect, even if you feel you know the engine very well. It's quick and easy insurance.

BEFORE STARTING: HAVE YOU
Drained Oil,
Drained Coolant
Pulled the Fuel Pump Fuse, started the car, and killed all Fuel Pressure?


  • Remove battery and airbox assembly
  • Remove intercooler (If turbo), and disconnect pitch stop mount
  • Detach the AC compressor and PS Pump and move to the side (No need to discharge either one)
  • Remove and label fuel lines
  • Detach the two main harness connectors on the passenger side of the motor and the two relay connectors on the passenger side wheel well, as well as grounding wires under the engine.
  • Disconnect throttle and cruise cables and (if manual transmission) clutch cable from slave cylinder as it runs under the intake to the transmission
  • Remove heater core coolant hoses and drain and remove radiator & hoses
  • Remove starter
  • If manual, Screw alternator bolt into service port on side of transmission to disengage the clutch fork.
  • Disconnect exhaust manifold (Or Downpipe if turbo) and unbolt the motor mounts
  • Jack up the transmission enough to clear the motor mount studs (may have to loosen the transmission mount on the crossmember)
  • If auto transmission, disconnect the torque converter bolts
  • Unbolt bottom bolts that mate the transmission to the block
  • Put your hoist in the engine compartment and give the motor enough tension to slightly lift it and remove remaining tranny/block bolts/nuts.
  • Use pry tool to break the two apart, pull forward and remove the engine.


At this point you're ready to pull the engine. Remove the engine by attaching the hoist to any bolt with a lot of support, people commonly use the A/C bracket, and the turbo heat shield bracket. You'll see some big ol' holes with lots of reinforcing materials on both of these brackets.

When pulling the engine, I like to have a second pair of eyes to make sure I'm not hitting or tugging on anything I shouldn't be. I'd be especially careful of the o2 sensor in the exhaust manifold, it likes to hit the frame. It takes some maneuvering to get the engine to clear the transmission, a lot of up, out, up more, out more, etc. movement of the hoist. You wanna make sure the hoist isn't pulling up too hard, otherwise it'll create friction and make it hard to pry away from the transmission bolts. You also don't want it too low, for the same reason. It's a balance, I just raised/lowered it, pried, repeated, until it came off. You'll feel what works,

The following only applies to those of you with a 4EAT or 5EAT
Below is some generally unorganized tips I've found on forums about removing the flexplate

Going into this I was real worried about this part which is why I collected a bunch of methods for disconnecting it, but it turned out to be very easy. I just laid across the top of the block, and used a 12mm socket on a ***8540; ratchet. Came off fairly easily. Didn't need any special extensions, didn't need to remove the intake manifold, etc. Don't let these scare you. One thing that doesn't seemed to be mentioned on forums, atleast I didn't see any mentioning it, you have to rotate the crank bolt to get each bolt to appear in the service port at the top.

Unbolt the FP from the TC with the engine still in the car. This will allow the two to separate and make the removal much cleaner. You also won't have to worry about getting the TC back on the input shaft of the trans. Only issue is getting the four bolts out of the flex plate. GOOD LUCK! they suck to get out.

make sure you remove plug on top of the passenger side of engine and remove the 4 bolts holding the torque converter to flex plate bolts before removing transmission so TC will come out with transmission

Theres only 4 bolts and you can access them from the hole on top of the bell housing. Its to the left as you look at the engine and may have a black rubber cover on it. I use a 12mm socket (make sure its a good 6pt one) and a 3/8 ratchet. It can be a pain to break them loose sometimes. What I have done is smack the handle of the ratchet with my hand or use a soft blow hammer.

6 point 12 mm socket on the 1/4" ratchet. Put a 14mm wrench on the ratchet handle to give you some leverage.
remove the intake manifold and use 1/4 socket and extension laid across the top of the block.


Only if you remove engine with TC: be sure to "seat" torque converter all the way in to transmission before reinstalling into car (rotate and wiggle to get it in)

------------------
Important Torque Values when reinstalling the engine
Heads: Loosen Headbolts and valve cover bolts in this order:

1 5 4
3 6 2

Tighten Headbolts and valve cover bolts in this order:

3 1 6
5 2 4

Following the tightening order, torque Head Bolts as following:

1. Torque All to 22 Ft Lbs
2. Torque all to 51 Ft Lbs
3. Loosen all 180 degrees
4. Loosen all 180 degrees
5. Torque Center Two bolts to 25 Ft Lbs
6. Torque Outer 4 bolts to 11 Ft Lbs
7. Tighten all bolts 90 degrees
8. Tighten all bolts 90 degrees again

Valve cover: 5ft Lbs
Intake Manifold Bolts: 18 Ft Lbs
Crankshaft Bolt: 101 Ft Lbs
Camshaft Bolts: 61 Ft Lbs
Flywheel Bolts: 55 Ft Lbs
Timing Belt Idler Bolts: 30 Ft Lbs
Timing Belt Tensioner (8mm Bolts): 18 ft lbs
Water Pump: 44 in lbs
Oil Pump: 44 in lbs
Cam Support or Rocker Shaft (8mm): 18 Ft Lbs
Transmission to engine bolts: 36.9 ft-lb
FlexPlate to Torque converter: 18FT-LB

WHEN YOU DONE REINSTALLING make sure you:
Refill Oil (If new block, use motul 10w40 breakin or similar oil)
Refill and Bleed coolant
Prime the engine (Turn over, without starting for 5-15s, 3-5 times. I do this by disconnecting Fuel Pump Fuse)
Reinsert Fuel pump fuse
Reconnect rad fan and transmission cooler lines
Reattach flexplate/transmission
Reattach engine mounts
Reattached ground wires
Reattach main harness, o2 sensor, etc.
Idle until operating temp or even longer, closely looking for leaks, smokes, unpleasant smells, or unpleasant sounds, also monitoring AP for check engine lights, misfires, or knock.

A VERY IMPORTANT THING TO HAVE WHEN REASSEMBLING YOUR ENGINE: LUBE

2 types: Engine assembly lube, and aintisieze thread lube. I put engine assembly lube on any metal to metal contact area I see in the block while it's out of the car. Namely the cylinder walls. If you take the shortblock/heads apart it will be used a lot more (cams, valves, pistons, rods, etc.) Your engine likely won't be sufficiently oiled when you first start it, so it's important to have some kind of lube for the first few rotations of the crank to ensure there isn't any irreparable damage that can cause you headache down the line. EA Lube is designed to be non-explosive and evaporate at higher temps so don't worry about it tainting your oil or causing issues within your engine.
Antiseize fastener lube is equally important. Every bolt on engine block assembly has specific torque values, and for a reason. Engineers have spent countless hours making these torque specs, and for good reason. They ensure the engine runs as planned throughout its life,and if not done properly, can cause issues as the engine ages. Fastener lube makes sure that there is no misc. friction while you're torquing the bolts, to ensure all readings are painfully accurate. I also use a ton of it on exhaust component fasteners (Turbo, headers, etc.) because they like to get seized over time due to the heating and cooling cycles, and this can help prevent that.


Other useful resources

Full write-ups with pictures:
https://forums.nasioc.com/forums/sho....php?t=1301065
https://forums.nasioc.com/forums/sho....php?t=1435733

Other peoples' methods to pulling flex-plate:
https://www.ultimatesubaru.org/forum...x-plate-bolts/

If you plan to tear down the engine further after removal: https://forums.nasioc.com/forums/sho....php?t=1435733
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Last edited by Mymomsoutbackxt; 02-27-2021 at 05:28 AM.
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Old 02-25-2021, 08:25 AM   #2
vanman23
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 519102
Join Date: Oct 2020
Location: Jenks, OK
Vehicle:
2005 OBXT

Default

Good write up. I just pull the engine with my son on an OBXT AT about 2 months ago. And then I , myself, pulled the engine out of an 04 WRT MT about a month ago. These were the first two engine pulls that I did. And yes much faster the second time.

I would recommend you change prime the engine to near the bottom of your list. It seems obvious but you may have those not so mechanically inclined do it in the exact order. You would not want them priming without oil.

When you do prime, I do not think it is necessary to disconnect the coil packs, especially on an OBXT since they are so hard to get to. Just leave the fuel pump fuse out. Also you can hold down the gas pedal and it will not start also.

I do not think you mentioned that on a MT, you have to remove the clutch fork shaft.

The hardest part for us was removing the torque converter/flex plate (TC/FP) bolts. Yes, it is easy enough to access but their probably stuck on tight especially if this is the first time it has been taken off. So now you run the risk of rounding over the heads. If you can get the intake off, it is 1000 times easier but thatís a pain to get off as well but not as much. What we did was, we were able to fish 2 long extensions underneath the intake and then use a socket on the bolts.

The hardest part with the install was again the TC/FP bolts. If you drop a bolt and it does not fall out, you will have to pull the engine. When putting the bolts back in initially, someone will have to turn the TC from underneath and the person on top will have to fish around with the bolt until they are lined up.

I agree, not too hard, but the TC/FP is the worst parts.
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Old 02-25-2021, 08:37 PM   #3
Mymomsoutbackxt
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 522441
Join Date: Feb 2021
Location: SLC, UT
Vehicle:
2007 OBXT
Pearl White

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by vanman23 View Post
Good write up. I just pull the engine with my son on an OBXT AT about 2 months ago. And then I , myself, pulled the engine out of an 04 WRT MT about a month ago. These were the first two engine pulls that I did. And yes much faster the second time.

I would recommend you change prime the engine to near the bottom of your list. It seems obvious but you may have those not so mechanically inclined do it in the exact order. You would not want them priming without oil.

When you do prime, I do not think it is necessary to disconnect the coil packs, especially on an OBXT since they are so hard to get to. Just leave the fuel pump fuse out. Also you can hold down the gas pedal and it will not start also.

I do not think you mentioned that on a MT, you have to remove the clutch fork shaft.

The hardest part for us was removing the torque converter/flex plate (TC/FP) bolts. Yes, it is easy enough to access but their probably stuck on tight especially if this is the first time it has been taken off. So now you run the risk of rounding over the heads. If you can get the intake off, it is 1000 times easier but thatís a pain to get off as well but not as much. What we did was, we were able to fish 2 long extensions underneath the intake and then use a socket on the bolts.

The hardest part with the install was again the TC/FP bolts. If you drop a bolt and it does not fall out, you will have to pull the engine. When putting the bolts back in initially, someone will have to turn the TC from underneath and the person on top will have to fish around with the bolt until they are lined up.

I agree, not too hard, but the TC/FP is the worst parts.

Great suggestions man! Thank you! The changes have been made
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