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Old 04-25-2015, 09:34 AM   #1
AVANTI R5
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Default Finding Easier Ways To Charge Electric Vehicles

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Jeremy McCool is convinced there is a better way to charge electric vehicles in a crowded city than using a wired plug.

Mr. McCool is founder and chief executive of Hevo Power, a Brooklyn-based start-up that is working to create a home for electric vehicles in an environment that is inherently challenging to them.

First, he and his team developed a wireless charger designed to look like an ordinary manhole cover and fit unobtrusively into the urban landscape. They are also working on what he calls a “green loading zone.” Electric trucks simply drive up and recharge wirelessly while they are parked. He plans to test the technology by the fall at New York University, on a groundskeeping vehicle.

That day will be a long-awaited milestone for Hevo Power, which has been working on its products for several years, Mr. McCool said.

“It has felt like an impossible journey,” he said. Hevo developed its wireless charging platforms with the help of a $240,000 grant from New York State.

With vast numbers of apartment dwellers, New York, along with cities like Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia and San Francisco, represents the promise, and the challenges, of what is a large, still-untapped market for electric vehicles.

“New York City has the highest percentage of apartment households in the United States,” said Jim Lapides, a spokesman for the National Multifamily Housing Council. That density, as well as government bureaucracy, cold weather, the difficulty of curbside recharging on busy streets and the high cost of owning a vehicle in a city in general, makes running an electric car a challenge.

But government officials remain committed to trying to encourage electric vehicle use, saying that even if only a small fraction of drivers switch to a plug-in car, the reduction in carbon emissions could be significant.

For example, the Philadelphia Parking Authority has pursued a novel strategy — it lets residents reserve public spaces for an annual fee and pay for installation of chargers there. But only about 20 people have signed up, according to Martin O’Rourke, a spokesman for the authority.

In California, the epicenter of electric vehicle deployment, NRG eVgo, a charging provider, is offering a special deal for apartment and condominium dwellers through the state’s Take Charge program. Property owners pay nothing to have their parking wired for electric charging. Car owners then pay $39 a month as well as the cost of electricity, which is rebated to the property owner.

“It’s been very challenging for renters in California who want to buy an EV,” said Terry O’Day, a vice president at NRG eVgo. The need is clearly large. In Santa Monica, where he lives, Mr. O’Day said that 80 percent of residents live in rental or condo properties.

There is the prospect of many more chargers to come in California, though. Pacific Gas and Electric, a utility in the central and northern parts of the state, is proposing to install 25,000 chargers in its coverage area. That kind of density suits the region.

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“We have a little more than 60,000 EVs registered, and that’s more than 20 percent of the total in the United States,” said Jonathan Marshall, a spokesman for the utility.

But in New York, especially Manhattan and Brooklyn, the challenges remain high. “Manhattan is so dense and vertical that traditional approaches to charging don’t work,” said John Shipman, who runs electric vehicle programs at Con Edison, the city’s main utility.

However, the obstacles have not stopped a multitude of agencies and companies from trying to make it a reality, starting with the city itself. Amy Spitalnick, a spokeswoman for the mayor’s office, said that city fleets now have 825 plug-in vehicles of all types, and 203 charging stations, — “still the largest single network in New York State.”

Ms. Spitalnick also pointed to a new city law that requires 20 percent of new off-street parking to be built “charger-ready.” Mayor Bill de Blasio’s administration, she said, “has been aggressively increasing the city government’s use of electric vehicles, while continuing to partner with the private sector to expand charging infrastructure for private vehicles.”

In 2013, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo introduced ChargeNY, which aims to put up to 40,000 plug-in vehicles and 3,000 public charging stations on state roads by 2018. According to state statistics, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority has supported 120 stations in New York City, though others have been installed without state help.

The private sector also has New York in its sights. NRG eVgo is “in the early stages” of building a fast-charging network in the New York City region, said David Knox, a company spokesman. CarCharging, based in Florida, has installed chargers in partnership with city parking garages and lots.

“Some are being used quite often; others less so,” said CarCharging’s chief executive, Michael D. Farkas. “We have a location at the Time Warner Center that is off the charts.”

Mr. Farkas said that the electric car he sees most frequently in New York is the Tesla Model S. Khobi Brooklyn, a spokeswoman for the high-end maker of electric cars, said that the company was committed to making charging convenient in Manhattan, and was “in discussion with dozens of parking garages” that are interested in installing Tesla stations.

There are currently 3,000 registered electric vehicles, including some operated by fleets, in Con Edison’s service territory, which includes New York City and Westchester County, Mr. Shipman said. It’s a fraction of the more than 2 million vehicles registered in the city alone.

Hevo Power, largely stymied in its efforts with manhole covers, said it was turning its attention to loading zones and fleets.

Hevo Power’s green loading zone would allow electric vehicles to charge and trucks to run their refrigeration units off available electric power.

Adam Lubinsky, managing principal at WXY Architecture + Urban Design, said his company had worked with the city to study the feasibility of such green zones.

Brett E. Skolnick, 63, who lives in Philadelphia and works in pharmaceutical development, is one electric car owner taking advantage of the Philadelphia Parking Authority’s program. He parks his Tesla Model S outside his home in the Fairmount neighborhood.

“We have no regrets,” he said, despite what he said were some minor problems. “The parking space has changed our lives in terms of being able to go out to dinner, visit friends and come back to an available space and charging.”
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Old 04-25-2015, 09:36 AM   #2
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Old 05-17-2020, 06:27 AM   #3
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Default The Holy Grail Of Electric Vehicle Charging


Photo Is 3/19;2019 Norway, world’s first wireless electric car charging stations for Oslo taxis.

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For all their hype and techno-wizardry, EVs still bow down to their gas-powered cousins when it comes to driving range, not to mention that they take much longer to refuel. But what if you could not only charge your EV wirelessly but also be able to do it on the fly? Suddenly, the EV glass ceiling would be forever shattered, leaving piston heads green with envy. That’s why a new technology that allows EV drivers to recharge their batteries on the go is bound to thrill EV buffs everywhere.

Stanford University researchers have unveiled a wireless charging technology that employs magnetism to seamlessly charge EVs, drones, and robots during operation.

But read on before you rush to ditch your gas-guzzler for a brand new Tesla Model 3.

Charging on the go

The scientists made their first breakthrough three years ago when they developed a wireless charger capable of transmitting electricity even as the distance to the receiver keeps changing. They were able to pull this off by using an amplifier and a feedback resistor that allowed the charging system to continuously adjust its operating frequency on the go.

That was a breakthrough given that wireless charging is highly sensitive to the relative movement of the device with respect to the power source during charging. Previous attempts to overcome this limitation employed nonlinear parity-time symmetric circuits to deliver robust wireless power. However, these systems experience huge power losses making them too inefficient for practical uses.

Unfortunately, Stanford’s first iteration also suffered from a similar handicap--it consumed too much power to generate the required amplification.

Their latest work, however, achieves much higher efficiencies by using a power-efficient switch-mode amplifier system that incorporates current-sensing feedback in a parity–time-symmetric circuit.

This arrangement maintains a constant effective load impedance across the switch-mode amplifier, thus allowing the amplifier to maintain high efficiency of up to 92% during charging.

Scaling the New Technology

Despite the impressive charging efficiency, Stanford’s prototype has only been demonstrated over a distance of 2-3 feet for the transmission of just 10 watts. This is nowhere near enough to charge your average EV, with Tesla superchargers typically spouting out ~250kW.

But don’t feel discouraged.

Shanhui Fan and Sid Assawaworrarit, the Stanford engineers who built the system, have said there “aren’t any fundamental obstacles” that would prevent their technology from scaling to transmit tens or even hundreds of kilowatts necessary to charge an EV.

Further, they have said they are “already within the range of practical usefulness” needed for recharging gadgets like robots during operation.

Game Changer for EV Industry

Over the past decade, EVs have made the remarkable leap from a curious fad widely viewed as a rich man’s toy to a mainstream technology that’s giving piston heads some serious food for thought. A big part of this success can be chalked up to great advances in battery technology that has made EVs more affordable and brought them closer to achieving cost parity with ICEs.

Still, many people considering the switch to EVs cite range limitations as their biggest concern.

Wireless charging--the most prevalent subset of wireless power transmission--is now a popular consumer technology commonly used by smartphone makers, including Apple, Samsung, LG, Nokia, and Google, among others. Indeed, wireless charging is now used in healthcare, manufacturing, and automotive industries and even the burgeoning Internet of Things (IoT) industry.


However, all these technologies employ charging pads that only work when the devices are stationary. Charging an EV wirelessly is a cool trick you can use to impress your buddies but does not improve the value proposition of owning an EV a whole lot.

That makes the tech by Stanford engineers a major leap forward because it gives us hope that one day drivers will be able to recharge their vehicles without having to stop for 30-60 minutes.

We don’t know yet whether the Stanford charging technology will be able to work over the entire 63-75 mile radius that’s typical between Tesla superchargers. But even increasing the typical driving range by 20-30% might prove enough to be a game changer for the EV industry.

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Old 05-18-2020, 11:36 AM   #4
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I didn't read the entire article as EV's are really not an interest to me, but I think where we left off was cities can barely keep up with road and bridge repairs due to infrastructure issues, there is no funds to install and maintain wireless charging in public areas that can effectively charge cars for the masses.

So the areas available to wirelessly charge is still going to be very limited..

You know how realtors and installers have created this BS Radon mitigation system requirements on new homes...imaging what BS they will create next from wireless charging..
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Old 05-18-2020, 01:11 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by oichan View Post
I didn't read the entire article as EV's are really not an interest to me, but I think where we left off was cities can barely keep up with road and bridge repairs due to infrastructure issues, there is no funds to install and maintain wireless charging in public areas that can effectively charge cars for the masses.

So the areas available to wirelessly charge is still going to be very limited..

You know how realtors and installers have created this BS Radon mitigation system requirements on new homes...imaging what BS they will create next from wireless charging..
So we have roads and bridges that need repair.....

We can do it right today, or spend money today and again in a few years......


Yeah, our ****s broken. Time to upgrade.
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Old 05-18-2020, 01:57 PM   #6
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Wireless charging is such a huge waste of energy, though...
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Old 05-18-2020, 04:34 PM   #7
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You know how realtors and installers have created this BS Radon mitigation system requirements on new homes...imaging what BS they will create next from wireless charging..
Way off topic, but not going to let this one slide... As someone with multiple family members who had Radon related illnesses, no, it's not BS. Radioactive gases can cause both acute and chronic illness...

Moving along, I agree, there's no way we can expect the US guberment to install and maintain these. Our system is so ****ed, we can't do anything except kick the can down the road.
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Old 05-18-2020, 05:10 PM   #8
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Way off topic, but not going to let this one slide... As someone with multiple family members who had Radon related illnesses, no, it's not BS. Radioactive gases can cause both acute and chronic illness...
Depends on the area. Our town has basically unmeasurable amounts, but folks like to install one as it adds value to the home.. which to me is BS. My house has one installed as it was renovated recently and it's the trend.

Even our village inspector said he thought it was BS for our area.
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Old 05-19-2020, 12:50 AM   #9
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Our system is so ****ed, we can't do anything except kick the can down the road.
And rack up debt like you’re 21 at an open bar, no matter which party is in political power. The last time they balanced the budget it was 20 years ago. It’s been a big free for all ever since on both aisles. People whine incessantly at any company that takes a repayable loan from the government and pay it off. All the while our government is the worst company in the United States from a financial perspective. It desperately needs to consolidate, trim a planet of fat, and get highly efficient. But with elected leaders and their own agendas, and government jobs everywhere that are basically permanent or life positions, well it’s never going to change. Pretty sad we can’t even maintain bridges, roads, highways, etc. Every 1%er and corporation doing everything in their power to get out of paying every dime of tax they possibly can with many corps paying zero net tax while they have billions in profits. It’s certainly not a system or government for the common man/woman. Hey let’s throw free higher learning in there and free healthcare for errybody!
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Old 05-20-2020, 01:14 PM   #10
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Depends on the area. Our town has basically unmeasurable amounts, but folks like to install one as it adds value to the home.. which to me is BS. My house has one installed as it was renovated recently and it's the trend.

Even our village inspector said he thought it was BS for our area.
oh, for sure. It's geographically specific. There are some areas that are more prone to it than others. All depends on what's going on in the ground.
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