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Old 10-02-2014, 10:42 PM   #1051
dmross
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Originally Posted by Soon2Bgreat View Post
I was watching Taking Stock with Pimm Fox last night and I saw you on there - I was like "Whoa, I know that dude...kind of. I mean, he's got a nice RS."

...it reminded me of the good old days when we were both trying to buy that burnt out white '02 wagon for swap parts, ha. Hope things are good.
Hey, good to hear from you. I still have the swap but I don't drive it enough these days. GCs are still the best Subaru ever.


Here's a link to the Pimm Fox interview:
http://www.bloomberg.com/video/bitco...Ndm6tGxsA.html

/shameless plug
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Old 10-23-2014, 03:51 PM   #1052
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Drugs, hacking, money laundering, and above all else, murder.

The bust of the Silk Road was headline news around the world instantly thanks to these salacious details. But the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) claims that alleged Silk Road kingpin Ross Ulbricht carried out six shocking murder-for-hire plots against staff, vendors, and innocent bystanders—not to mention a brutal torture allegation—seemed to seal his fate in the eyes of the public. When most of the world first met Ross Ulbricht, the word murder was printed in big black letters right next to his face.

Ulbricht's alleged murder plots transformed Silk Road from a politically conscious, pro-drug online market to a dangerous and militant drug cartel.

So, where are those murder charges now?

To date, there have been precisely zero murder charges filed. Instead, the indictment has been changed without explanation, the formal charges omitted, and the broader accusations buried within a lesser drug trafficking charge.

Of the six murder indictments trumpeted by the U.S. government in the days following Ulbricht’s Oct. 2013 arrest, five have fallen off the table and the sixth sits untouched in a separate indictment (legalese for an unproven allegation) that was purposefully left out of the upcoming trial.

Prosecutor Serrin Turner used the murder-for-hire allegations to get the judge to deny bail. Now, Turner isn’t even going to charge Ulbricht with the murders.

Why have six of the most important accusations been left as yet uncharged?

“Maybe you don’t have that proof,” criminal defense attorney Jay Leiderman told the Daily Dot. “Maybe the proof isn’t as good as you thought it was.”

There are a couple of other possibilities that deserve mention. First, there may be informants out there that the prosecution doesn’t want to expose, that they want to use for other cases, so they’re willing to leave half a dozen murders uncharged in order to protect him. Second, they may have determined that a relevant informant is unreliable and can’t be used in trial.

Either way, the murder accusations are buried and uncharged.

For over two years, from Silk Road’s 2011 creation until the spectacle of Ulbricht’s 2013 arrest, a founder who went by the name Dread Pirate Roberts was seen by many as a revered political activist. He wrote grandiose essays against the war on drugs and prohibition, he talked about Silk Road’s positive impact on humanity, and regularly described the market as “founded on libertarian principles.”

Given the waning popularity of America’s war on drugs, it was no surprise to see wide support for Silk Road’s efforts: A less violent, anonymous way to buy drugs without going to the street corner appealed to many thousands of people.

Then came the multiple murder accusations, minutely detailed and narrated in the initial indictments but apparently lacking in the sort of substance required to formally charge Ulbricht.

Nevertheless, the court of public opinion swung fast and hard. The detailed stories of murder and torture in the indictment set the stage dark, long before any trial began—nevermind a verdict being delivered. Even Silk Road users recoiled at the stories of death and violence. The accusations were hard to reconcile with the ideal-driven leader so many had come to respect.

“Good luck reconciling torture and assassination with making a ‘positive impact on humanity,’” one commenter wrote on the day the second murder-for-hire accusations were made public.

“He clearly never actually believed in those things,” another person replied, in regards to Dread Pirate Roberts’ political writings. “I would bet that he is a sociopath that has become very adept at concealing his true nature to other people.”

Dread Pirate Roberts once wrote prolifically about non-violence, even saying “#SilkRoad while under my watch will never harm a soul. If we did, then we are no better than the thugs on the street." Now, he was as bad as any violent drug dealer in the eyes of the public.

Ulbricht, meanwhile, was guilty until proven innocent.

“The case comes in, it’s a big splash, it’s all over the news,” Leiderman explained. “Almost a year later, these big mean offensive counts get dropped, it’s not a front page story anymore. It’s somewhere in the recesses of the paper. It's just not a big deal. At that point people already associate the case with murder-for-hire. No prosecutor would ever say that’s what they’re doing, but as a long term criminal defense attorney, this happens all the time.”

Lyn Ulbricht, Ross’s mother, believes the murder accusations have suppressed public support, hamstrung legal defense fundraising, and dealt a blow to morale.

“Public perception matters for fundraising,” Lyn told the Daily Dot. “That’s been a struggle. His father and I both want the best defense possible for him.”

Despite not formally charging Ulbricht with murder, the prosecution has relegated the accusations to “overt acts” in a narcotics trafficking charge. That means that, without having to actually prove the accusations to the jury, as they would a formal criminal charge, federal prosecutors will use the uncharged murder allegations as evidence of Ulbricht’s character and motivations in order to further other charges.

“The use of violence and threatened violence to protect one’s drug empire are relevant to proving the intentional operation of a narcotics conspiracy, and such conduct may be alleged as overt acts in furtherance of such a charge,” the prosecution asserted in a letter between Ulbricht’s defense team and the court.

There’s an old aphorism that says a good prosecutor can persuade a grand jury to indict a ham sandwich. That’s because the burden of proof is extremely low, gives the accused no protection or recourse, and can be a separate matter from the actual charges filed for a trial.

“An indictment over a year old?” Lyn Ulbricht said. “That’s a stale sandwich.”

When it comes to major criminal prosecutions, multiple indictments—Ross Ulbricht has faced indictments in three jurisdictions over the course of this saga—are often issued to exert pressure on the defendant.

“The whole point of having extra indictments is to put extra pressure on,” Leiderman explained, “and bring you to the table to force a resolution.”

While five of the murder indictments have been excluded from the charges in New York, where Ulbricht is scheduled to stand trial in January, the sixth remains in a Maryland indictment against Ulbricht, a document that hasn’t been touched for over a year. And there’s no reason for prosecutors to change the Maryland indictment at this point because it’s a useful tool.

“That’s typically the purpose of these things,” Leiderman told me.

“This is the government accusing a citizen of a very serious crime,” Lyn Ulbricht asserted. “Is this a trial tactic?”

It often is a tactic. In another high-profile case, for example, Hector Xavier Monsegur, an Anonymous hacktivist known as Sabu, faced nine separate indictments. Looking at a massive battle, he flipped quickly and served as an invaluable informant for the FBI.

There are several possibilities for what could happen next with the murder accusations against Ross Ulbricht. First, he could win his trial in New York and then be tried again in Maryland, if the charges and relevant proof are different than what the prosecution used in New York. A so-called “global disposition”could wrap up both Maryland and New York charges that result in Ulbricht heading to prison and both cases finishing up. He could also plead in New York in order to get Maryland dismissed.

At this point, there’s no telling how USA v. Ulbricht will land. The prosecution may want to try the case come hell or high water and Ulbricht may be dead set on saying he’s completely innocent and avoiding a plea deal.

On the other hand, Ulbricht lawyer Joshua Dratel may be doing an effective job of showing the prosecution that they don’t have the strongest case in the world. After all, he’s already got much of the tech world (if not the court) convinced that the FBI is lying about how it carried out its investigation.

Getting the murder indictments dropped altogether may be the first step towards new and more reasonable offers from the other side of the courtroom.

All the while, most of the public still associates the Silk Road trial with drugs and murder, even as the prosecution declines to bring charges on Ulbricht’s most heinous alleged acts.
http://www.dailydot.com/crime/silk-r...ross-ulbricht/
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Old 12-07-2014, 11:29 AM   #1053
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Howdy all.

In August my uncle passed away and as I was cleaning out his house came across all of his bitcoin mining gear. Apparently he had thousands upon thousands of bitcoins but we cant find his log in password so are just going to chalk it up as a loss. I have no idea what the gear is worth (if anything) or the best way to sell it. Anyone here willing to take a look through the pics I took and either buy it or offer some advice on the best way to get sell it or tell me it's worth nothing and just chuck it? If interested send me a PM with an email address and I will send a zip of the pics. Thanks
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Old 12-07-2014, 01:52 PM   #1054
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Thousands of bitcoins? You may wanna try a little harder to recover those.
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Old 12-07-2014, 02:05 PM   #1055
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Yeah, you could be looking at a serious sum of money there.
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Old 12-07-2014, 02:07 PM   #1056
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Ya...thousands = million or more in USD yo!
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Old 12-08-2014, 09:54 AM   #1057
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Fair enough. Maybe he meant thousands of dollars worth. He wasn't making a whole lot of sense near the end. Any idea what to do with this stuff?
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Old 12-08-2014, 09:56 AM   #1058
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Howdy all.

In August my uncle passed away and as I was cleaning out his house came across all of his bitcoin mining gear. Apparently he had thousands upon thousands of bitcoins but we cant find his log in password so are just going to chalk it up as a loss. I have no idea what the gear is worth (if anything) or the best way to sell it. Anyone here willing to take a look through the pics I took and either buy it or offer some advice on the best way to get sell it or tell me it's worth nothing and just chuck it? If interested send me a PM with an email address and I will send a zip of the pics. Thanks

email Nick, he might be interested. And if not, he can probably give you some advice.
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Old 12-08-2014, 09:59 AM   #1059
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Gee thanks.
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:02 AM   #1060
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no really!
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:03 AM   #1061
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Originally Posted by UberWilhelm View Post
Fair enough. Maybe he meant thousands of dollars worth. He wasn't making a whole lot of sense near the end.
Sounds like a textbook bitcoin nut.
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:05 AM   #1062
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PM SubEd.

Seriously though if had thousands of coins, yeah you really want to try harder. My guess is he had thousands of dollars worth of coins - even that may be worth your time. Is it $2,000 or $50,000? How much effort do you want to put into it?
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:20 AM   #1063
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Sounds like a textbook bitcoin nut.
Wow. Thanks for catagorizing my dead uncle for me
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Old 12-08-2014, 10:33 AM   #1064
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Originally Posted by docwhorocks View Post
PM SubEd.

Seriously though if had thousands of coins, yeah you really want to try harder. My guess is he had thousands of dollars worth of coins - even that may be worth your time. Is it $2,000 or $50,000? How much effort do you want to put into it?
Since BTC is currently at around $370 per coin. Thousands of coins equals hundreds of thousands of dollars at a minimum.

I'd try harder too.
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Old 12-08-2014, 01:25 PM   #1065
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I'll give you retail value plus shipping for the hard drive(s).
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Old 12-09-2014, 02:09 AM   #1066
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Let's just say "hypothetically" 22 TerraMiner IV asic units fell into your lap. How profitable would it be, if at all, to use these things??
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Old 02-05-2015, 10:23 AM   #1067
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I guess the most appropriate thread for this. The Dread Pirate Roberts found guilty.

Quote:
(Bloomberg) -- The founder of the Silk Road website faces life in prison for running an underground Internet emporium that catered to hackers and drug traffickers.

Ross Ulbricht, 30, who used the moniker “Dread Pirate Roberts,” offered people the chance to anonymously buy illegal merchandise and services with bitcoins. On Wednesday, a jury took just three and a half hours to find him guilty on all seven federal charges.

Wearing a navy jacket, blue shirt and tan pants, Ulbricht didn’t have a visible reaction to the verdict. His parents, Lyn and Kirk Ulbricht, both dropped their heads, while some of Ulbricht’s supporters wept.

“Ross is a hero,” a courtroom observer, Derrick Broze of Houston, shouted as U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest was wrapping up the proceedings.
Ulbricht’s lawyer, Joshua Dratel, said his client will appeal. Dratel said Forrest blocked him from calling witnesses supporting the defense.

Prosecutors claimed Ulbricht ran Silk Road from 2011 to 2013, armed only with a laptop and a Wi-Fi connection. When he was arrested, his computer was filled with evidence showing he conceived the site, ran it and even tried to arrange the murder of five people who threatened the anonymity of buyers and sellers. Prosecutors told jurors that $213 million in bitcoins were used to buy drugs and other illegal items on the site.

Ulbricht faces as long as life in prison when he’s sentenced May 15. One of the counts carries a mandatory 20-year minimum.

Dark Web
“The supposed anonymity of the dark web is not a protective shield from arrest and prosecution,” Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara said in a statement after the verdict.

Ulbricht claimed he was set up as a “fall guy” by Mark Karpeles, the former head of the bankrupt Mt. Gox Co. bitcoin exchange, or by someone else who was the real Dread Pirate Roberts. A six-man, six-woman jury in Manhattan federal court rejected Ulbricht’s claim that he only ran Silk Road for a few months.

Charges against Ulbricht included trafficking drugs on the Internet, narcotics-trafficking conspiracy, running a continuing criminal enterprise, computer-hacking conspiracy and money-laundering conspiracy.

At the start of the trial on Jan. 13, Dratel told the jurors that his client started Silk Road as an “economic experiment,” then passed it to someone else after a few months.

Ulbricht’s online name was taken from a character in the 1987 film “The Princess Bride,” prosecutors said.

Texas Native
The Texas native was arrested in a San Francisco public library on Oct. 1, 2013, “caught red-handed” after logging onto his computer as “Dread Pirate Roberts,” prosecutors said.

Federal agents seized Silk Road, along with bitcoins worth $3.6 million, and shut down the site.

The agents testified they found on Ulbricht’s computer online chat transcripts, Silk Road maintenance logs, to-do lists, weekly reports, accounting entries and a computer journal detailing the beginnings and growth of Silk Road. The government also found more than $13 million in bitcoins, most of which they traced back to Silk Road.

Pretrial Ruling
In a key pretrial ruling, Forrest in October rejected Ulbricht’s request to bar electronic evidence seized from the laptop, his Gmail and Facebook accounts, and a Silk Road computer server in Iceland. Forrest ruled that because Ulbricht didn’t claim any personal connection to the material, he lacked the ability to complain that police had seized it illegally.

During the trial, Forrest blocked Dratel from presenting an expert in computer-based currencies and another in cybersecurity, saying he’d failed to give prosecutors the required time to prepare.

Outside court Wednesday, Ulbricht’s parents blamed the judge for the verdict, saying they were “outraged.”

“I think it would have been a very different outcome if the jury had been permitted to hear all the evidence,” Lyn Ulbricht said.

The jurors heard evidence that Ulbricht paid $150,000 to someone claiming to be a member of the Hells Angels motorcycle gang to kill a Silk Road user who called himself FriendlyChemist. The government claimed FriendlyChemist sought to extort Ulbricht by threatening to publish a list of names and addresses of Silk Road sellers and buyers unless he was paid $500,000.

Ulbricht didn’t face murder solicitation charges in the trial and prosecutors said they don’t believe any murders were carried out. Forrest said the government could use the evidence to show Ulbricht’s connection to Silk Road.

Ulbricht faces one murder solicitation charge in Baltimore.
The case is U.S. v. Ulbricht, 14-cr-068, U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York (Manhattan).
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...s-dread-pirate

I'm pretty sympathetic to what he was trying to do, but the attempted murder was pretty bad.
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Old 08-01-2015, 08:24 PM   #1068
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http://www.cnn.com/2015/08/01/asia/b...ted/index.html

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(CNN)Japanese police have arrested the head of the Mt.Gox bitcoin exchange company over the loss of a "massive amount" of the virtual online currency.

Mark Karpeles was detained Saturday, the Tokyo-based company said in a statement.

He is suspected of accessing the exchange's computer system and falsifying data to change the outstanding balance, Japan's Kyodo News Agency reported ,citing the Metropolitan Police Department.

A day earlier, a report emerged that Karpeles was going to be arrested, prompting him to send a message to The Wall Street Journal describing the allegations as "false." He told the paper that he planned to deny them.

Mt.Gox was one of the world's largest bitcoin exchanges until February last year, when it stopped investors from accessing money after becoming the target of online hackers.

Where is Bitcoin legal?

The exchange later filed for bankruptcy debts of 6.5 billion yen ($64 million).

According to its statements, Mt.Gox made $380,450 in revenue during 2012. However, it lost 13 times that amount the next year, when it also handed more than $5 million to the U.S. government for allegedly lying on bank documents.

At the time of its closure, Mt.Gox said that it couldn't find 850,000 bitcoins, leaving angry customers out of pocket.

However, soon after, the company said it had recovered 200,000 bitcoins -- worth about $56 million at today's rates -- from an old-format wallet used before June 2011.

That reduced the number of missing bitcoins to 650,000, or around $183 million at current rates.
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Old 08-01-2015, 10:03 PM   #1069
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I guess the most appropriate thread for this. The Dread Pirate Roberts found guilty.



http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articl...s-dread-pirate

I'm pretty sympathetic to what he was trying to do, but the attempted murder was pretty bad.
Fwiw 7 of 8 murder charges were dropped due to insufficient evidence the 8th is either currently, or is about to be, tried...
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Old 08-02-2015, 09:23 AM   #1070
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Can anyone give me a 100 words or less summary of why anyone would be "sympathetic to what he was trying to do"?

It doesn't seem like a pretend underground web site for drug traffickers, computer hackers, and smugglers is something most people would get behind, but maybe the media has glossed over all of the great work The Silk Road did for underprivileged children?
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Old 08-02-2015, 10:32 AM   #1071
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I didn't know you were for the man keepin' people down, Dave.

I can see how someone might think that things like drug laws are stupid, and people should be able to do what they want. I also think that there are better ways to change that than run a web site that makes a person a multi-millionaire by facilitating illegal commerce and promoting an illegal use of the USPS. I also don't understand how someone could think they could just say "I never ordered all that opium, I don't know why I've been getting a pound of it every month. I just throw it out."

I wonder if he actually used any of the money to work towards achieving his libertarian ideals.

Last edited by chapstien; 08-02-2015 at 10:44 AM.
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Old 08-02-2015, 02:52 PM   #1072
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I'm not a very large fan of the war on drugs, personally I think it has caused the industry to become more violent and has caused more deaths than prevented. I have no facts supporting thid, but this isn't PP so they're not needed. I wish we would spend more time and money treating the underlying factor which leads people to drug abuse, than locking them up and focusing on the supply chain.

I also believe that if you take away some of the stigma you take away some of the allure. If a person wants to ruin their life on heroin, then so be it. At least let them get it in a safe manner and relatively pure so as to not accidentally OD because it's laced with fentynal or big game tranquilizer (it happens). Or methamphetamine users could get adderall or some other more pure equivalent rather than something that involves lithium taken from batteries.
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Old 08-02-2015, 03:12 PM   #1073
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I just want to day Dread Pirate Roberts is an awesome online handle.
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Old 08-04-2015, 02:00 AM   #1074
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In related news, for those of us who've kinda forgotten about the BTC market, it's up a bit, from averaging $220-240 for months, up to a steady $280ish the last few weeks.

<-- still has some mining rigs going using my works power. ~20 bucks a month. Ballar*

* - 2x R280x, 2x 7950, 3x 7870, 1 7850, 1 7750, 1 5670. I bet I'm using $50/mo in electricity...aww yeah
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Old 08-31-2015, 07:06 PM   #1075
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I need some bitcoin. Last time I had this need (maybe two years ago?) I went to CVS and wire transferred it to someone and it ended up in a "wallet", the number of which I wrote down, but not the provider so my "change" is gone, and everything seemed only a little sketchy. This time around people are asking for my UN and login for my online banking and isht feels totally sketchy!

Where do I go and what do I do to get my $40 worth of bitcoin with the least amount of sketch thank you please?
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