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Old 07-22-2019, 07:12 AM   #1
AVANTI R5
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Default Volvo, Toyota Invest Millions In Drive-Through Inspection Startup




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An Israeli startup has come up with technology to instantly inspect vehicles for physical and mechanical flaws leading Volvo Cars, Toyota Tsusho Co, Toyota Group’s trading unit and commercial insurance holding company W.R. Berkely Corp. to collectively invest $31 million in the company.

Tel Aviv-based UVeye uses a combination of artificial intelligence, machine learning and cameras to create a drive-through system that automatically detects even the slightest flaws in a vehicle, according to UVeye CEO Amir Hever.

UVeye's is an Israeli startup that developed a drive-through vehicle inspection system.


UVeye
“We’re able to find everything from a really small scratch, as small as 2 millimeters, to then understanding the gaps, or in case of collision to understand exactly what parts were damaged,” said Hever in an interview.

The system can be placed anywhere along an assembly line to find any issues before the vehicle is completely built, as well as at the end of the line to provide a final inspection, Hever explained. The drive-through inspection system can also be used at dealerships, rental car lots and by insurance companies, Hever added.

There are actually three different inspection models examining a vehicle’s undercarriage, tires and the exterior.

“Our customer can use the whole solution together or each can be used standalone,” said Hever.

Indeed, each of the companies investing in UVeye has a different plan for how they plan to use the technology.

Volvo Cars plans to set up UVeye inspection stations at several locations globally.


Volvo S90 approaching UVeye drive-through inspection module.

UVeye
Both Toyota Tsusho and Volvo say they will set up inspection stations internationally using UVeye’s. In Volvo’s case, it will be used at factories, dealerships and for aftermarket sites.

“Premium quality standards are at the core of the Volvo brand, and we are intrigued by the possibilities that UVeye’s technology offers,” said Zaki Fasihuddin, CEO of the Volvo Cars Tech Fund, in a release. “This type of advanced scanning technology could allow us to take the next step in quality.”

Toyota Tsusho is looking to UVeye to “support distribution to used-car centers and throughout the company’s footprint within the Japanese auto market,” according to a news release.

This latest round of funding is the second investment in UVeye for W.R. Berkley, which sees wider use of drive-through inspection technology for the insurance industry.

“When we made our initial investment in UVeye two years ago, we believed its system could have game-changing impact within security and inspection applications globally, and today’s announcement validates that early hypothesis,” said Mike Nannizzi, director of Fintech investments from W. R. Berkley, in a statement.

UVeye already has relationships with automakers Daimler AG and Skoda Auto, along with this latest addition of Volvo. Hever said the company is working with at least two other automakers that he couldn’t reveal right now.

But the company is clearly looking beyond automotive manufacturing as evidenced by its dip into the insurance industry through its relationship with W.R. Berkley. Hever pointed out it can used in states that require motorists to bring their vehicles in for annual inspections, at rental car companies to quickly determine if any of its fleet’s vehicles suffered damage in the hands of a customer and at used car lots, to assess the condition of vehicles acquired by trade-in or purchased at auction.

That’s not to say other industries aren’t interested in UVeye’s drive-through inspection technology.

“We get a a lot of inquiries for aviation, trains, ships,” said Hever, “but we’re focusing on the car industry because we understand there are a lot of opportunities for us.”
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Old 07-22-2019, 07:13 AM   #2
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Old 07-22-2019, 11:44 AM   #3
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technology - coming for all of your jobs, one by one.
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Old 07-22-2019, 12:23 PM   #4
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I could see this working at the end of the assembly line/when a brand new car arrives at the dealership, but I do not believe this will ever work in a service environment.

As an example, how would this system detect a worn ball joint? How would it detect worn syncros? Literally anything internal would be impossible to detect with this method. There are just to many parts and too many variables. Traditional mechanics will remain in business for a long time, possibly indefinitely.

The only replacement for a human mechanic is an A.I. with a fully developed human intellect, which is not going to be possible for a long time.

Half of performing repairs on a vehicle involves forming theories which is not something an AI is capable of.
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Old 07-22-2019, 12:31 PM   #5
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Originally Posted by scriptkiddy View Post
I could see this working at the end of the assembly line/when a brand new car arrives at the dealership, but I do not believe this will ever work in a service environment.

As an example, how would this system detect a worn ball joint? How would it detect worn syncros? Literally anything internal would be impossible to detect with this method. There are just to many parts and too many variables. Traditional mechanics will remain in business for a long time, possibly indefinitely.

The only replacement for a human mechanic is an A.I. with a fully developed human intellect, which is not going to be possible for a long time.

Half of performing repairs on a vehicle involves forming theories which is not something an AI is capable of.
Its sensor suite doesn't cover internal parts, sure. But that will come. And "theories" are entirely possible via machine learning: feed it enough data and it'll come up with possibilities that have led in this giant dataset to analogous outcomes.
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Old 07-22-2019, 01:20 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scriptkiddy View Post
The only replacement for a human mechanic is an A.I. with a fully developed human intellect, which is not going to be possible for a long time.

Half of performing repairs on a vehicle involves forming theories which is not something an AI is capable of.
It's not a replacement for a human mechanic, or inspection for internal mechanical failures... but could absolutely impact the number of people needed for visual inspections. And I'm sure it'll do a better job than any human can, since it can scan and compare to much tighter tolerances than a human could visually identify. So there's benefits for the mfr, for sure. And more importantly benefits for stakeholders.
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Old 07-22-2019, 02:44 PM   #7
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Please not MORE sensors that are expensive, break easily, and routinely need replacing...
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Old 07-22-2019, 03:05 PM   #8
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Please not MORE sensors that are expensive, break easily, and routinely need replacing...
Don't you want the wiring harness to weigh more than your motor?
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Old 07-23-2019, 06:28 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by scriptkiddy View Post
I could see this working at the end of the assembly line/when a brand new car arrives at the dealership, but I do not believe this will ever work in a service environment.

As an example, how would this system detect a worn ball joint? How would it detect worn syncros? Literally anything internal would be impossible to detect with this method. There are just to many parts and too many variables. Traditional mechanics will remain in business for a long time, possibly indefinitely.

The only replacement for a human mechanic is an A.I. with a fully developed human intellect, which is not going to be possible for a long time.

Half of performing repairs on a vehicle involves forming theories which is not something an AI is capable of.
Actually, I would want UVeye performed on my (esp. high end) vehicle after insurance collision repair. Gaps, paint flaws, etc,etc are not easily caught by human eye. Plus, adds a lot time in doing so adding cost which trickles down to the consumer. Buying used car same thing. Human can’t notify to worn syncros, ball joints till the point of almost failure. UVeye on the other hand can, by tire wear, how vehicle is placing on tire footprint etc. It can do chemical analysis instantly by sticking a probe in all fluids (while doing hundred other things at the same time). I get your point especially decade or so ago.
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