Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Sunday May 29, 2022
Home Forums Images WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Transmission (AT/MT) & Driveline

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.







* As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. 
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads. 
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-21-2001, 06:54 AM   #1
lakepop
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 3851
Join Date: Jan 2001
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: WNY/NVA
Vehicle:
2007 Outback Ltd.
Champagne Gold

Default 4eat torque split

Tried a search without any definitive responses.

What I'm looking for is the torque split on the 01 4eat. Specifically what is the split in 1,2 and R. Lots of I thinks but unable to get a real answer.

I'd like to know if the split is 50/50 in those gears and if possible a reference source ie shop manual/literature. I did not find an answer in the owners manual or in any searchs in the i-club.


Thanks for any help....tried the Edmunds forums....lots of opinions over there....nothing I can hang my hat on.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
lakepop is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Old 08-21-2001, 10:22 AM   #2
SubyBean
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 4367
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Houston,Tx. out in the boonies
Vehicle:
1999 IMPREZA 2.5RS
Black :-( with dings

Default hope this helps

i know for sure in gear 1. it is 50/50
i think in 2. it is 90/10
and in reverser it is 50/50 im not sure about 2 and reverse but i am positive about 1 being 50/50
brian
SubyBean is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2001, 01:47 PM   #3
Joe Hogan
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 699
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: Green Mountain State
Vehicle:
2002 golf TDI
Blue

Default

From observation, a 50/50 torque split is most definately engaged in 1st and at least a good portion of 2nd, if not all, when WOT is applied.
Lately the MY99RS-t has been FWD only ... the front wheels spin in ALL gears if any WOT power is applied. When the MY99RS-t is in AWD mode the wheels spin only to relieve shock load at gear changes [a good thing] This leads me to believe that the torque is being spread evenly between the wheels at WOT.


BTW the car will literally do FWD burnouts moving only a few feet, there is that LITTLE traction available at the front tires
Joe Hogan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-21-2001, 04:36 PM   #4
lakepop
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 3851
Join Date: Jan 2001
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: WNY/NVA
Vehicle:
2007 Outback Ltd.
Champagne Gold

Default

I also "think"it is 90-10 in D, 50-50 in 1,2 and R however I need a definitive answer and reference if possible.

No one knows might be the answer and I will attempt to do the research myself. I was hoping a resident tech might have the answer and save a lot of reading........mucho gracias!
lakepop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2001, 09:48 AM   #5
Foxbat
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 654
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Fairfax, VA
Vehicle:
2021 Crosstrek Ltd
Black

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by lakepop
I also "think"it is 90-10 in D, 50-50 in 1,2 and R however I need a definitive answer and reference if possible.

No one knows might be the answer and I will attempt to do the research myself. I was hoping a resident tech might have the answer and save a lot of reading........mucho gracias!
The shifter position has nothing to do with it. It's the gear position determines the torque split. At 1st or Reverse, the AWD is locked in 50/50 split. At any other gear position, the computer takes over and put 90/10 in normal driving condition but you may get anything between 90/10 to 50/50 depends whether you're accelerating or braking and any wheels slipped.

Put shifter in D lets 4EAT to use all 4 gears. Put it in 3 lets 4EAT only shift to 3rd gear. Put it in 1 or 2 will lock the 4EAT to that gear (1st or 2nd), no shifting at all.

Remember, unlike on MT Subarus, a locked 50/50 torque split put heavy load on central differential and should not be engaged for a longer period of time. It's also not good for turning.

Foxbat
Foxbat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2001, 09:53 AM   #6
ImprezedRS
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 2771
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Charlotte, NC
Vehicle:
2003 BMW Z4
Blue

Post

You know Subaru's saying "From the wheels that slip to the wheels that grip.", now think about that. That saying is for there automatics. This is what it really is on a auto. 1,2, & R on the shifter is a constent 50/50 split. Now 3 & D on the shifter is 90/10 split at crusing speed but changes around depending on what tires are spinning and what tires can grip hence the saying "From the wheels that slip to the wheels that grip."
ImprezedRS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2001, 09:59 AM   #7
Foxbat
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 654
Join Date: Dec 1999
Location: Fairfax, VA
Vehicle:
2021 Crosstrek Ltd
Black

Default

Quote:
Originally posted by ImprezedRS
You know Subaru's saying "From the wheels that slip to the wheels that grip.", now think about that. That saying is for there automatics. This is what it really is on a auto. 1,2, & R on the shifter is a constent 50/50 split. Now 3 & D on the shifter is 90/10 split at crusing speed but changes around depending on what tires are spinning and what tires can grip hence the saying "From the wheels that slip to the wheels that grip."
No extactly. MT Subarus do the same thing on any gear mechanically. The 50/50 split on AT is locked which means all 4 wheels has the same torque and can not vary. The MT 50/50 is not locked. Power will leak to the wheels with least grip. Then, the viscous liquid heats up and lock the MT central diff and bring the split back to 50/50.

Notice Subaru only say 'WHEELS' not wheel as its AWD system can only transfer power between axles. You will need front and rear LSD to transfer power from side to side.
Foxbat is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2001, 10:14 AM   #8
mhj
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 3057
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Arlington, MA
Default

If you go to the Subaru website and click on the All Wheel Drive System section it'll explain most of what you are looking for.

The normal 4EAT split is 90/10.
When the gear selector is in 1 or 2, the split is 50/50.
Cars with VTD (automatic only) have a 45/55 split.
mhj is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2001, 06:24 PM   #9
lakepop
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 3851
Join Date: Jan 2001
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: WNY/NVA
Vehicle:
2007 Outback Ltd.
Champagne Gold

Thumbs up

Many thanks for the perceptive answers. This is pretty much what I was looking for and I am impressed with the non BS answers provided.

Great job........I LOVE THIS PLACE!
lakepop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-24-2001, 10:45 AM   #10
lakepop
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 3851
Join Date: Jan 2001
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: WNY/NVA
Vehicle:
2007 Outback Ltd.
Champagne Gold

Default

Lets try one "bump" to see if I can get a reference source for the already useful info....thanks
lakepop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-27-2001, 10:13 PM   #11
Joelk
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 7790
Join Date: Jun 2001
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Redmond
Vehicle:
2009 wrx

Default

This is a pretty good overview of how the 4eat AWD system works. This is for MY99, but it's probably very similar to newer models. Somehow, reading this makes the 4eat sound pretty good, I'm not so dissappointed with the 90-10 split anymore.

(taken from http://homepage.mac.com/joeaux/svx/drivetrain.txt )


Active All-Wheel Drive

Active all-wheel drive is a term coined by Subaru to differentiate the all-wheel drive system in the automatic transmission from other "reactive" all-wheel drive systems on the market today. What makes this all-wheel drive system so special is its ability to anticipate traction needs and take action before a wheel slips.

The mechanism that transfers torque fore and aft is contained within the transmissionās tailshaft. To the casual observer it looks just like a typical hydraulic clutch found in any automatic. The key difference in this clutch pack is its operation. Its designed to slip dependent on how much all-wheel drive is needed. Normally, when an automaticās clutch slips, itās malfunctioning and will burn up. But the multi-plate transfer (MPT) clutch uses a special friction material (changed for 1999 toreduce low speed judder) that easily withstands the friction loads generated during torque transfer.

The MPTās operation is controlled by the transmissionās ECU (Transmission Control Unit or TCU) and constantly changes dependent on how the vehicle is being driven. To get more AWD less slip occurs within the clutch pack. Less AWD calls for more slip and the TCU reduces the hydraulic pressure to the clutch.

Under normal, dry pavement operation torque split is about 90% front and 10% rear. This distribution helps to compensate for the carās weight distribution and resultant smaller effective rolling diameter of the front tires. As weight transfers to the rear of the vehicle like when under acceleration, the TCU shifts the torque split more toward the rear wheels.

Under hard braking torque is directed forward which helps with shorter stopping distances. Torque distribution is changed based upon how the vehicle is being driven. Throttle position, gearshift lever position, current gear and other factors combine to influence the TCU and it, in turn, selects a software map that determines how aggressively torque split will be adjusted.

Two speed sensors are used by the TCU to detect wheel slippage. One sensor monitors the front axle set, the other the rear. Pre-programmed variables help the TCU differentiate between slipping wheels and normal wheel speed differentials as when cornering. A speed differential (front-to-rear) of up to 20% signals the TCU that the vehicle is cornering and torque is distributed to the front wheels to help increase traction during the turn. Anything above 20%, however, indicates to the TCU that wheel slippage is occurring and torque is then distributed to the rear wheels.

Another feature that sets this all-wheel drive system further apart from most is its interaction with the anti-lock brake system. When ABS is engaged, the transmission selects third gear reducing the unpredictability of engine braking and, thus, reducing the possibility of wheel lock-up. But all four wheels are still connected to the engine through the AWD system and are brought back up to overall wheel speed quicker and can, therefore, be controlled again sooner. In a two-wheel drive system if the locking wheel isnāt a drive wheel, it can only be brought back up to overall wheel speed by whatever traction exists between it and the road. The quicker a wheel can be controlled, the better the stopping performance.
Joelk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2001, 08:24 PM   #12
SubyTechMaster
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 4423
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Placerville, CA USA
Vehicle:
'04 08 Tribeca, SVX
Gold, Maroon

Default

Most of the answers here are BS.

The TCU will split the torque however is needed according to a program unless the speed sensors indicate a slip. You can observe this by looking at the data stream from the TCU for the MPT clutch solonoid (solonoid C). As you accelerate the split will be 50/50 no matter what gear range, when you are cruising it goes to FWD (95%) to save fuel.

If the A/T stayed at 90/10 like is often stated the MPT clutch would wear out in a month. This is clutch pack and it will not last if it is slipping. It will be at partial engagement only to lesson shock, otherwise 0% duty is 50/50, 95% duty is FWD or 100/0. There is no 100%duty.

Under hard braking (ABS) the A/T shifts into 3rd with no engine braking (coasting) and the split goes to 100/0 (FWD).
SubyTechMaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-28-2001, 09:24 PM   #13
Joelk
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 7790
Join Date: Jun 2001
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: Redmond
Vehicle:
2009 wrx

Default

So, 0% duty means the MPT clutch has full pressure, and is essentially locked, right?

But, even if the MPT clutch was at 95% duty, wouldn't it only slip if the front and rear axles were turning at different speeds (ex. front wheels spinning)? Why would the MPT clutch wear out if it ran at 90-10, but it wasn't slipping?

Of course the MPT clutch has to have SOME slippage even on dry pavement to make up for slight differences in tire sizes or going around a corner for example. So, if we're talking about this, then the MPT clutch is almost ALWAYS slipping. I'm refering more to major slippage.

I agree that any clutch at partial engagement with too much load will slip and eventually wear out. But as I understand, the front wheels will handle most of the load, so not much load is going through the MPT clutch under most normal driving conditions. And, since the axles and driveshafts are always turning, you would either have to lock your parking brake or attempt to spin the front tires to make the MPT clutch slip. In both cases, the speed sensors would notice this, and bring the MPT clutch to 0% duty.

Please correct me if I'm mistaken(and that is very possible). I really want to learn more about this, so please add to the discussion.

Thanks,

Joel
Joelk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2001, 11:10 AM   #14
bluesubie
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 767
Join Date: Jan 2000
Chapter/Region: Tri-State
Location: N.J.
Vehicle:
04 FXT
20 OB Onyx XT

Default

Quote:
If you go to the Subaru website and click on the All Wheel Drive System section it'll explain most of what you are looking for.
Close, but no cigar. SoA's website has never said anything about being able to lock torque split in 1, 2, and R. As a matter of fact, the 4EAT section of their website doesn't even mention 90/10 any longer.
For many years I've read about this locking at 50/50 business, but have never heard it from Subaru.
SubyTechMaster (Ed?) - Any comments on the locking the torque split?

Dennis
bluesubie is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2001, 03:07 PM   #15
SubyTechMaster
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 4423
Join Date: Feb 2001
Location: Placerville, CA USA
Vehicle:
'04 08 Tribeca, SVX
Gold, Maroon

Default

The only time the TCU is going to "lock" the torque split 50/50 (other than a slipping wheel condition) is in Failsafe, typically for a Speed Sensor fault or an MPT Solonoid fault.
SubyTechMaster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-29-2001, 03:31 PM   #16
svxtrem
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 1008
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Grand Forks, ND
Vehicle:
2006 STI
Steel Grey Metallic

Default

Of course, you can always disconnect the power feed to Solenoid 'C' (at least that's what it is on my SVX). Instant 50/50 torque split.

JoelK is correct, the reason the clutch doesn't wear out in a month of long distance cruising is the clutch surfaces are barely touching (if at all- you can only read duty cycle from select monitor, not actual contact), and normally the front and rear wheels are going the same speed.

Just to continue, the solenoid (this is on my SVX- may be slightly different on new cars) is driven by a PWM signal. So, the clutch is being opened and closed very quickly. When duty cycle is high, it is held open (like pushing in a clutch) most of the time. When duty cycle is low, it is being held closed most (all) of the time. This is why the clutch doesn't wear out that quickly- it really isn't being 'slipped' except for forced slippage when the front and rear driveshaft are rotating at different speeds.

Last edited by svxtrem; 11-29-2001 at 03:38 PM.
svxtrem is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-30-2001, 10:02 AM   #17
IggDawg
Celebrity Guest Star
 
Member#: 10648
Join Date: Sep 2001
Chapter/Region: NESIC
Location: Sort of Boston, MA
Vehicle:
2008 Acura TL
Wicked Black

Default

Is anyone else here, arguing aside, stricken by how amazing our 4EAT/ AWD system is? Its incredibly versatile, and does its job with an amazing ease. Honestly, I'm proud to have a system like this in my car. Its so much nicer than a transfer case.. eww..

-IggDawg
IggDawg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2008, 04:02 PM   #18
rocosoaz
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 169327
Join Date: Jan 2008
Default related info

Greetings. New member here, hoping to get some info on TCS reaction time. As soon as the system will let me, I'm going to start a new thread titled "TCS and TCU reaction time".

Thanks,

Wayne
rocosoaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2008, 06:06 PM   #19
a6n6d6y
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 123347
Join Date: Aug 2006
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: SEATTLE
Vehicle:
1993 POS
burgandy legacy

Default

what's a TCS ?
a6n6d6y is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-18-2008, 10:11 AM   #20
rocosoaz
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 169327
Join Date: Jan 2008
Default Tcs

Q: what's a TCS ?

Traction Control System, part of the VDC setup. Supposedly can brake wheels independently to increase torque on the opposite wheel. In the thread "TCS and TCU reaction time", I'm hoping that somebody can explain how quickly and in what order the various traction aids take effect.

Wayne
rocosoaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2008, 02:17 AM   #21
ballitch
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 74907
Join Date: Nov 2004
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: salem, OR
Vehicle:
98 cam'd EJ251
Wrx Tranny,slowr than ish

Default

Are you talking about the VTD system, like on the early USDM wrx, or the newer models with VTD and VDC?

In my opinion, the newer models have a leap forward in AWD technology. If a wheel slips, the brakes get put on and the power goes to the opposite wheel (on the same axle of course , i.e.; front or rear. ) Also, the front rear torque split is much higher, i've read 45 front/55 rear.

I cant comment on the reaction time, I think the only people that know that answer are the people that designed, or programmed the software for that system. But I would guess itis pretty fast. I recently saw a video on you-tube that showed several "AWD" cars and tested them on the exact same ramp/field/mud.

VTD: variable torque distribution

VDC: vehicle dynamics control



~Josh~
ballitch is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2008, 10:01 AM   #22
rocosoaz
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 169327
Join Date: Jan 2008
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ballitch View Post
Are you talking about the VTD system, like on the early USDM wrx, or the newer models with VTD and VDC?

In my opinion, the newer models have a leap forward in AWD technology. If a wheel slips, the brakes get put on and the power goes to the opposite wheel (on the same axle of course , i.e.; front or rear. ) Also, the front rear torque split is much higher, i've read 45 front/55 rear.

I cant comment on the reaction time, I think the only people that know that answer are the people that designed, or programmed the software for that system. But I would guess itis pretty fast. I recently saw a video on you-tube that showed several "AWD" cars and tested them on the exact same ramp/field/mud. VTD: variable torque distribution VDC: vehicle dynamics control ~Josh~
'08, Outback 2.5i Limited, with VDC and TCS, but not VTD (if I understand it correctly). So normal torque distribution is 90/10.

I was thinking that somebody might either comment on conditions similar to mine (10% grade, choppy gravel surface), or discuss scanner readouts in those conditions. After some research I see that generic scanners apparently don't display those sensor readings, and the factory-type scanners are too expensive to use on a single vehicle. The autoenginuity might be an exception, but their enhanced version is only sold as part of a $700 package (added to the base $250). :-( Anybody know of any deals on a suitable scanner? I'd like to get one to use on loaner car in my conditions.

Wayne
rocosoaz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-19-2008, 01:52 PM   #23
a6n6d6y
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 123347
Join Date: Aug 2006
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Location: SEATTLE
Vehicle:
1993 POS
burgandy legacy

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rocosoaz View Post
'08, Outback 2.5i Limited, with VDC and TCS, but not VTD (if I understand it correctly). So normal torque distribution is 90/10.

I was thinking that somebody might either comment on conditions similar to mine (10% grade, choppy gravel surface), or discuss scanner readouts in those conditions. After some research I see that generic scanners apparently don't display those sensor readings, and the factory-type scanners are too expensive to use on a single vehicle. The autoenginuity might be an exception, but their enhanced version is only sold as part of a $700 package (added to the base $250). :-( Anybody know of any deals on a suitable scanner? I'd like to get one to use on loaner car in my conditions.

Wayne

http://www.subaru.com/shop/specifica...ry=PERFORMANCE

according to Subaru's web site the TCS is part of VDC system

VTD pertains to how the AWD system transfers power

there is is also a MPT system that has been used in older vehicles that seems to be (or is )being phased out
a6n6d6y is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-26-2012, 07:35 PM   #24
beau13990
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 259659
Join Date: Oct 2010
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by svxtrem View Post
Just to continue, the solenoid (this is on my SVX- may be slightly different on new cars) is driven by a PWM signal. So, the clutch is being opened and closed very quickly. When duty cycle is high, it is held open (like pushing in a clutch) most of the time. When duty cycle is low, it is being held closed most (all) of the time. This is why the clutch doesn't wear out that quickly- it really isn't being 'slipped' except for forced slippage when the front and rear driveshaft are rotating at different speeds.
This is not correct. Yes, the "Duty C" solenoid is driven by a PWM signal, which is cycling on and off repeatedly. This does not mean that the clutch is engaging and disengaging at the same frequency, though. It could not; the PWM signal cycles on and off much faster than the clutch pack could ever engage/disengage. This is an inherent difference between a device that uses DC electric current (fast) as its communications medium, and a device that uses hydraulic fluid (slow).

Consider, for example, that there are multiple clutch plates, and only a single PWM signal. The PWM signal is an on-or-off input, whereas the MPT clutch pack has multiple clutches, which can be either engaged, disengaged, or anywhere in between. This is therefore a system that is completely different in nature from the on/off PWM signal.

In fact, it is the average value of the PWM signal over a relatively long period of time (tenths or hundredths of a second versus thousandths or millionths) that establishes the engagement of the clutch pack as a whole. The PWM might be on 50% of the time over some small span of time, for example, resulting in 50% of the clutches in the clutch pack being fully engaged for that span of time. This is a hypothetical example that is nevertheless indicative of how the device really operates at the most basic level.

The reason that MPT units don't wear out (or, at least, don't wear out quickly or frequently) is open to speculation, but has nothing to do with the fact that the PWM signal in an on/off one. To a great extent, I think the durability of the MPT reflects the fact that some special materials are used to construct the clutch packs, but this is just speculation.

Last edited by beau13990; 02-26-2012 at 07:44 PM.
beau13990 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-27-2012, 02:05 AM   #25
GDB FAN
Scooby Guru
 
Member#: 105814
Join Date: Jan 2006
Chapter/Region: NWIC
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by beau13990 View Post
This is not correct. Yes, the "Duty C" solenoid is driven by a PWM signal, which is cycling on and off repeatedly. This does not mean that the clutch is engaging and disengaging at the same frequency, though. It could not; the PWM signal cycles on and off much faster than the clutch pack could ever engage/disengage. This is an inherent difference between a device that uses DC electric current (fast) as its communications medium, and a device that uses hydraulic fluid (slow).

Consider, for example, that there are multiple clutch plates, and only a single PWM signal. The PWM signal is an on-or-off input, whereas the MPT clutch pack has multiple clutches, which can be either engaged, disengaged, or anywhere in between. This is therefore a system that is completely different in nature from the on/off PWM signal.

In fact, it is the average value of the PWM signal over a relatively long period of time (tenths or hundredths of a second versus thousandths or millionths) that establishes the engagement of the clutch pack as a whole. The PWM might be on 50% of the time over some small span of time, for example, resulting in 50% of the clutches in the clutch pack being fully engaged for that span of time. This is a hypothetical example that is nevertheless indicative of how the device really operates at the most basic level.

The reason that MPT units don't wear out (or, at least, don't wear out quickly or frequently) is open to speculation, but has nothing to do with the fact that the PWM signal in an on/off one. To a great extent, I think the durability of the MPT reflects the fact that some special materials are used to construct the clutch packs, but this is just speculation.
You do understand you're quoting someone from 11 years ago, correct?
GDB FAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Torque Split 4EAT 05 RS Sport formula91 Transmission (AT/MT) & Driveline 3 02-23-2009 10:27 PM
Torque split mod for 4eat EvenSteven Transmission (AT/MT) & Driveline 4 08-26-2008 07:13 PM
Possible to make a gauge to measure torque split of 4EAT? DNut Transmission (AT/MT) & Driveline 10 04-12-2008 01:13 AM
4Eat & Varying Torque Split Need BB Transmission (AT/MT) & Driveline 4 11-28-2004 04:51 PM
Any way to make reverse 4eat torque split? Keiho Transmission (AT/MT) & Driveline 3 04-26-2002 02:17 PM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2022 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2019, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.

As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.