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Old 12-06-2019, 08:10 PM   #1
jimh3063
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Default Intake temps too hot

I have 2004 STi. It's have a GT30 kit on it and a FMIC. I am getting 190 intake temps. I can't do a cold air intake as the place to put it in the fender is being taken by the FMIC plumbing.

Does anyone have a similar config and have rigged up some type of cold air intake?
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Old 12-06-2019, 11:46 PM   #2
A.S.N.F.
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Let me guess, your cold side piping to your throttle body is on the right hand side. Also could you post a pic of your set up or give more info?
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:10 AM   #3
jimh3063
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Default Fmic

A.S.N.F.
You are correct on the cold side piping routing


Any constructive thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks
Jimmy
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:32 AM   #4
rtv900
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you mean 190 steady state? Like running at speed decent throttle, not after sitting or something?

If so yeah that blows, that's majorly sapping power.
I mean you have intercooling piping snaking up to a front mount right? So you obviously know how to lay out good flowing curves. You must know there's one solution, re-do your intake piping and duct it to a better spot. Even if you have a long length exposed to under hood temps it will still be an improvement when running at steady state, there won't be much heat transfer to a substantial flow and you could even insulate it if you wanted to make it better.

I get space is not in abundance but there's no other way.
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Old 12-07-2019, 10:41 AM   #5
A.S.N.F.
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Actually there is something you could do. The problem with these set ups is the air is being cooled down and then re-heated after it leaves the inter-cooler by the header/down-pipe, tubro and coolant tank. I would take out that side of the piping and get some heat isolation on the inter cooler pipe in that area.
You could also start playing with the idea of redoing the piping to your turbo and to your throttle body to effectively reverse them, as in the cold side of the piping is on the left hand side. Cobb specifically makes their kits to be reversed like this to avoid this type of thing.
Not to be mean, but right now my GrimmSpeed top mount is able to keep things cooler even before I used heat reflecting tap and wrapped my turbo. Not saying that to be mean, just saying as how bad it is heating up.

Also, just to be safe, inspect your intercooler and make sure it is not clogged up with crap. I have seen intercoolers and radiators clogged up by cotton (some areas have cotton every year from cotton trees).

Last edited by A.S.N.F.; 12-07-2019 at 10:49 AM.
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:42 PM   #6
viper_crazy
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First of all, testing and data acquisition is important to plan your next steps so your not just throwing money and guessing based on what the internet said.

That said......

Some of this is reiterated and expounded on a bit.

I get that the intake is positioned this way more so out of necessity, but where is your IAT sensor located? Have you measured the intake temps at the filter and if so, are these temps satisfactory? If they are, leave the intake alone. If not, as you and a few others have kindly pointed out, you'll need to relocate the inlet and/or isolate the filter element. Where it's sitting may very well have nice, fresh cold air hitting the area from the front of the hood, so it may end up being a gigantic waste of time and money to use/design a new intake but you'll need data to determine whether or not you are satisfied with where it is.

Second, your piping runs back over a few radiating heat sources (i.e.: the turbo). You practically might as well just remove the intercooler as all that is practically undoing the IC's job. Your cheapest option would be to insulate. Better option would be to relocate. The best option is to do both.

I would personally be curious to know temps at every step of the way. Ideally in five locations: intake filter, just after the compressor outlet, IC inlet, IC outlet, at the throttlebody. This data would give you a decent picture of how the air is being affected as it moves through the intake and would help give you a better understanding on what needs to happen.

Also, your IC, even though it's a reputable name brand, may not be as efficient as we are lead to believe, however testing would be required to determine if this is the case.

All of this is assuming that you're serious about horsepower. If all you want is to see improvements, skip all that and proceed to spending money where you may not need to.
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Old 12-07-2019, 10:00 PM   #7
turboblew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.S.N.F. View Post
...
Not to be mean, but right now my GrimmSpeed top mount is able to keep things cooler even before I used heat reflecting tap and wrapped my turbo. Not saying that to be mean, just saying as how bad it is heating up.
what is the R value of this magical tape???
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Old 12-07-2019, 11:59 PM   #8
A.S.N.F.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turboblew View Post
what is the R value of this magical tape???
Just the standard DEI heat tape that everyone else uses. Heck of a lot cheaper that it was 16 years ago when I was getting whatever I could for my Supra. Their is more expensive and better stuff, but that goes up an enormous amount per square foot.
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Old 12-08-2019, 12:56 AM   #9
turboblew
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.S.N.F. View Post
Just the standard DEI heat tape that everyone else uses. Heck of a lot cheaper that it was 16 years ago when I was getting whatever I could for my Supra. Their is more expensive and better stuff, but that goes up an enormous amount per square foot.

afaik there has always been a high R value foil insulation available at home depot... R30 as a single layer or double if you 2 layer it. I dont believe the DEI stuff does anything and would be suprised if its higher than an R1 value.

Also there have been sleeve materials available for well over 20 yrs... they are pretty effective in engine compartments with not much real estate.
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