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Old 07-11-2018, 12:34 PM   #1
MtnXfreeride
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Default Bakre Pads Fit Tight in Caliper

A year ago I replaced rear pads/rotors on my moms 2013 impreza.. the inner rear pads were toast.. outer pads seemed not even half used. The toasted pads were rough to get out.

When I put the new aftermarket pads (not cheapo ones) the inside rear pads were a tough fit to get into the caliper.. very tight.. I spent a lot of extra time wire brushing the calipers to fit and even then it took force. Afterwards, it has made intermittent rubbing noise while driving like the pads are dragging on the rotor.

After bleeding my brakes a few days ago I noticed my inside rear pads on my 2012 WRX are toast, but the front and rear outside pads are fine. (20K miles since dealership last replaced them using OEM parts)

Ive ordered new pads/rotors... and I have a suspicion since I could barely get the rear pads out to inspect them that Im going to have the same issue with poor fitment causing excess noise and uneven wear...

Is there a good solution for this issue? Do I put the new pads to a grinder and strip the paint off so they fit well, or attack the caliper with a grinder and risk taking off too much and having excess noise from rattling?
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Old 07-11-2018, 12:58 PM   #2
Charlie-III
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I have never used OEM pads in any car.
For quite a few (especially Subaru, but others as well), I have to fit the pads.

Remove SS shims, wire brush the pad carried, install SS shims (new or used), put in pads.
They should have a "little play" radially in and out as well as along the OD of the rotor.
If not, determine what needs tweaking. I use a 4" grinder. Maybe take off total pad backing plate length, maybe shave down the ears a bit, whatever.
You may not see the play, but you can feel it.
You shouldn't only need fingertips to install pads.
Lube pad/carrier contact points with a disc pad lube, install.

If you need tools to install the pads in the carrier, the pads are too tight.
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Old 07-11-2018, 12:59 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie-III View Post
I have never used OEM pads in any car.
For quite a few (especially Subaru, but others as well), I have to fit the pads.

Remove SS shims, wire brush the pad carried, install SS shims (new or used), put in pads.
They should have a "little play" radially in and out as well as along the OD of the rotor.
If not, determine what needs tweaking. I use a 4" grinder. Maybe take off total pad backing plate length, maybe shave down the ears a bit, whatever.
You may not see the play, but you can feel it.
You shouldn't only need fingertips to install pads.
Lube pad/carrier contact points with a disc pad lube, install.

If you need tools to install the pads in the carrier, the pads are too tight.
+1
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Old 07-11-2018, 01:00 PM   #4
Charlie-III
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BTW, what are "bakre pads"?!?!

Lol.........
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Old 07-11-2018, 01:09 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie-III View Post
BTW, what are "bakre pads"?!?!

Lol.........
**** .....

So.. spend time to wire brush pad holder really well. Test fit pads.. and grind pads as needed until they slide but not so much I can feel a wiggle.

I was concerned about grinding the paint off the ears causing rust down the road and thus sticking.. I take it that wont be an issue with some copper anti seize or brake parts lube in there?

Last edited by MtnXfreeride; 07-11-2018 at 01:14 PM.
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Old 07-11-2018, 02:16 PM   #6
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Clean the whole inside of the caliper area that holds the brake pads.
Don't ruin the rubber seals on the pistons.
You make think you got all the crap out initially, but you probably didn't.

Check to make sure the pistons are not seized / seizing in the caliper. That could mean either a rebuild or replacement of the caliper.

Sometimes, depending on the brand, you may have to file down some of the brake pad backing plate ( the metal plate that the pads are glued to ) to get a good fitment.

"bakre pads"?!?! Dog-speak for brake pads?
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Old 07-11-2018, 07:04 PM   #7
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SJ, forget the pistons, we are still stuck on the pads having a bit of float in the pad carrier.

To anyone else, pretty much any braking imparts heat through to the pad backing plate. This makes it hot, it gets bigger, the little float goes away with heat.
If the pads are tight when at ambient, you WILL have pad drag with almost any heat.
Period.

Yes, I needed a 3lb hammer and a punch to remove pads that an "ASE certified" tech installed.
Sheesh......

Old pads (correctly installed) may need a bit of pushing 40K miles later to remove due to rust growth.
A 3lb hammer is NOT an approved pad removal tool.
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Old 07-11-2018, 09:45 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie-III View Post
Yes, I needed a 3lb hammer and a punch to remove pads that an "ASE certified" tech installed.
Sheesh...
Very common problem. Brake dust/ rust/ corrosion builds up under the anti-rattle clips on the caliper bracket and causes the pads to freeze in place. It doesn't matter who installed them- happens on the first pad change sometimes.

I don't like grinding the pads- as someone mentioned, the metal of the pad becomes exposed and causes rust. When rust forms, it expands- like water expanding into ice. If the pad rusts, it will expand and freeze in place. That's why I only grind the bracket under the clips (sometimes only a wire brush is necessary). Do that, then dry fit the pads- they should be able to pop on and off freely with little effort. Then lubricate the ears of the pads where they sit in the clips. Good to go!
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Old 07-12-2018, 08:18 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charlie-III View Post
SJ, forget the pistons, we are still stuck on the pads having a bit of float in the pad carrier.
While the main issue appears to be pads stuck in the caliper housing, the rapid wear on the inner rear pads may also be due to pistons sticking or frozen, for any number of reasons.

Properly cleaning out the caliper from brake dust, rust, etc. is the first priority and may solve the issue, but if the issue persists, piston movement needs to be checked also. Since the OP has to get the pads out anyway to clear the caliper, it's also a good time to verify the pistons are moving smoothly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainSlowbaru
I don't like grinding the pads- as someone mentioned, the metal of the pad becomes exposed and causes rust. When rust forms, it expands- like water expanding into ice. If the pad rusts, it will expand and freeze in place.
That's why you would paint over the ground area to prevent rust.
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Old 07-12-2018, 10:05 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samurai Jack View Post
While the main issue appears to be pads stuck in the caliper housing, the rapid wear on the inner rear pads may also be due to pistons sticking or frozen, for any number of reasons.
My first thought as well.
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Old 07-12-2018, 12:25 PM   #11
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I was stuck fitting the pads into the pad holder.. no caliper involvement. I think my rapid uneven wear on my current pads are because instead of gliding evenly I can only wedge it and push and move either top or bottom at a time.. im guessing it got wedged from the previous dealer install.

as seen here:
https://photos.app.goo.gl/oDfkciQcKj7XWBtH7
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Old 07-12-2018, 01:19 PM   #12
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Me thinks you are confusing terms here.

Essentially, the whole thing that holds the pads is the caliper.
Caliper consists of a housing + pistons and bolts to the knuckle.

Your pads fit into the caliper housing. The thin metal shims/slides are there to help keep the pad aligned in the caliper. The shims/slides have to fully seat, as designed, to allow the pads to slide freely.

Your caliper housing could be too rusty to allow the pads to slide freely and/or you have too much brake dust built up in the caliper and/or your have partially or fully frozen pistons.

If you get a lot of brake dust build-up, that brake dust can get as hard as a rock and it can take a fair amount of effort to remove.
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Old 07-12-2018, 02:37 PM   #13
MtnXfreeride
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Samurai Jack View Post
Me thinks you are confusing terms here.

Essentially, the whole thing that holds the pads is the caliper.
Caliper consists of a housing + pistons and bolts to the knuckle.

Your pads fit into the caliper housing. The thin metal shims/slides are there to help keep the pad aligned in the caliper. The shims/slides have to fully seat, as designed, to allow the pads to slide freely.

Your caliper housing could be too rusty to allow the pads to slide freely and/or you have too much brake dust built up in the caliper and/or your have partially or fully frozen pistons.

If you get a lot of brake dust build-up, that brake dust can get as hard as a rock and it can take a fair amount of effort to remove.
Yes, I called the caliper housing the caliper above. When I had issues last time I did have the caliper housing down to bare metal with a wire brush.

I was referring to your comments above that seemed to be talking about the caliper fitting over the pads tight as in the pads were too thick or piston not compressed all the way. When I was looking my issue up elsewhere many threads kept derailing to people talking about that which is unrelated.

Thanks for the input everyone! After ensuring a clean caliper housing down to bare metal, if the pads are still not sliding decent, Ill take the pads to a grinder or file to remove the paint on the tabs.
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Old 07-12-2018, 04:42 PM   #14
Charlie-III
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As an aside, whether I "fit pads" or not, any pad contact point to the carrier, SS shims, whatever, gets a liberal coat of a "disc brake moly lube". There are many types and brands, pretty much any of them slow/stop rusting where you may fit the pads.
The lube is also good on unmodified pads.

Oh, and NO, if I fit pads, I do NOT paint the fitted surfaces. I do a high temp pad lube (as mentioned above) on ANY pad to support contact spot. Because.......well.......you SHOULD.......
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Old 07-13-2018, 01:11 AM   #15
MedicDG
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MtnXfreeride View Post
A year ago I replaced rear pads/rotors on my moms 2013 impreza.. the inner rear pads were toast.. outer pads seemed not even half used. The toasted pads were rough to get out.

When I put the new aftermarket pads (not cheapo ones) the inside rear pads were a tough fit to get into the caliper.. very tight.. I spent a lot of extra time wire brushing the calipers to fit and even then it took force. Afterwards, it has made intermittent rubbing noise while driving like the pads are dragging on the rotor.

After bleeding my brakes a few days ago I noticed my inside rear pads on my 2012 WRX are toast, but the front and rear outside pads are fine. (20K miles since dealership last replaced them using OEM parts)

Ive ordered new pads/rotors... and I have a suspicion since I could barely get the rear pads out to inspect them that Im going to have the same issue with poor fitment causing excess noise and uneven wear...

Is there a good solution for this issue? Do I put the new pads to a grinder and strip the paint off so they fit well, or attack the caliper with a grinder and risk taking off too much and having excess noise from rattling?


Here’s a couple of things to check:

Make sure that caliper slide pins move back and forward with ease Manufactures lube tends to dry up fast and causes brakes to drag. I recommend high temp line that won’t damage black rubber boots.

Second if you have not changed your brake fluid every 30k miles this could cause your pistons to stick causing brake drag.

Good luck
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