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Old 12-05-2007, 06:29 AM   #1
Brydon
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Join Date: Feb 2006
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Default Engine Building: EJ251 with STI Rods/Pistons and head work

This is a mirror of a project I have started on RS25. I'm building a motor for my 2001 Impreza RS. I had the people vote and the decided they wanted a ej251 block with STI Rods/Pistons and Delta Cams and Supertech valve springs. The complete build will be under $2500 Including the turbo setup and EM. It should make around 350Whp and 350Wtq. It will also have a great powerband and be built to last. This is what the people wanted so this is what I'm doing. As a side effect I want everyone to be able to copy this. This forum is full of a huge number of DIY'ers so I thought I would share.


So for everyone that wants to build there own motor here is a little writeup. I will write it here and then revise it with your suggestions and then post it in the DIY section. Sound good?

The first thing you need to do is of course take the motor out. There is a good DIY put I will probably add pictures when I take mine out of my RS. Second The motor is first shown with no manifold or timing belt. It was free so you will have to imagine. Although if you can't figure out how to get the belt off you should probably not try this.

This is real DIY since I have 3 motors I'm currently working on I ran out of engine stands so I'm taking it apart on the floor of my garage.

As for tools you will need I will start a list and go from there. There are some un-usual tools that you might have to buy or in my case make, cause I'm cheap.

Tools:
10mm end wrench
12mm end wrench
3/8 breaker bar
3/8" ratchet with various extentions
10mm socket
12mm socket
12mm 12point socket
14mm socket
1/2" breaker bar or large ratchet
14mm 12point socket
17mm socket
19mm socket
14mm hex for whrist pin removal
Wristpin removal tool. i made mine for cheap but they are $80 from the dealer.
Large screw driver for rear wristpin covers
Valve spring compressor

Not needed but nice:
Impact gun for large nuts and bolts
Magnet for heads

Don't be shy if I missed something let me know!

This picture is of the motor fresh after deinstall. The timing cover is off and the belt is deinstalled.



To deinstall the timing belt you are going to need to loosen up the timing belt tensioner. Take a 14mm socket and remove it. Be sure not to loose the washer and o-ring that are on the back side of the tensioner. The o-ring is just there it make sure nothing falls apart on reinstall so this is important for easy installation.

Once the tensioner is off the belt will come right off leaving you with just a few pulleys left to take off.



The two pulleys on the right side (yes right side as seen from the drivers seat. I know weird subaru. this is USDM passenger side) of the motor need to be deinstalled and they use a 14mm bolt as well.



Since your here you might as well deinstall the pulley on the left side also.



You will also need to take off the crank pulley right now.



What I like to do is put all of the bolts from the timing belt cover and all the pulleys and the crank gear in a bag. So all the outside of the motor bolts don't get mixed up with anything that is internal. I also put the covers and any other random out side bolts in the bag. You can label the bag if you think you might forget but it's easy to see what they are and they wont get lost or loose.



Take off tis little rear timing belt cover and place it and the bolts in the bag with all of the rest of your parts.



Now that that is all taken car of you can move on to taking the heads off. Since this is SOHC you do not need to remove the cams or cam pulleys. This is much easier then the DOHC heads that require some impacting of a 10mm hex bolt off. Or in a lot of cases cutting them off because they are seized on to the pulleys.



So start by removing all the valve cover bolts from the valve covers. As soon as the head is off I reinstall the valve covers to keep dust, dirt, or anything else from getting in the heads. It also makes the heads easier to store and you never loose the valve cover bolts.



Once the heads are off you will see the heads of the head bolts. They look weird because most people have never seen 12 point bolts before. This requires a 14mm 12 point socket. Please don't cheap out on this because you don't want to strip one out because you are using tool bought from the local auto parts store that were made in tiawan and cost $10 for a set of socket. I spent hundreds on my Snap-on impact full set from 10-24mm but that is not nessasary also. But they have never failed me and I've done alot of motors.

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Old 12-05-2007, 06:30 AM   #2
Brydon
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This is what I use and it works great. The bolts are tight on there because they are stretch bolts. So this is a good time to call up that body building friend of yours and finally put him to use.... Or just man up and do it. There are 6 bolts to take out so start with the outside four bolts and then the center ones. It doesn't actual tell you to do this on deinstall but that is how I do it.



After the bolts are all off your head will come right off. Put the valve cover back on and store the head to the side out of your way.



This coolant pipe now needs to come off because it is bolted the the left head. Three 10mm bolts and it will be free.



Now it is time for the valve cover. After doing the first head you should be well on your way to understanding what needs to be done. So take off the valve cover and place it somewhere safe with the bolts left in it.



Sometimes the bolts are really on there and they require a little extra leverage. Never try impacting these off as you will probably destroy the bolts. So just like the last head, take off all six head bolts and the head will come right off. Reassemble the valve cover and place it with the other head. Throw away the used head gaskets! I will get back to the heads later because I'm doing valve springs so they will be torn down and cleaned up in the future but the short block is more important right now. Because I want to know what I need to buy.



Now that the heads are off it is time to work on the shortblock. Start by taking the oil pan off. There is a bunch of little 10mm bolts that hold it on. Subaru uses somthing called Fugibond to seal the oil pan. There is no gasket on silcon to seal it. Once all the bolts are out take a rubber mallet and hit all the sides of the oil pan. It takes some force but it will eventually free up the oilpan and not cause any damage. Do not pry on the oil pan with screw drivers as you mar the block surface and bend the pan. Also don't use a hammer because it will dent the pan. both will most likely make the pan leak when it is reinstalled. And resealing the pan after the motor is in the car is a pain.

I would place all of those 10mm bolts into your external parts bag.



After the pan is off you will need to deinstall the oil pickup tube. It is held by three 10mm bolts. After they are off it should come right out.



The windage tray is the next thing to come off. This helps oil not to splash up into the crank and keep the oil in the pan so you dont starve the motor. five more 10mm bolts and it is free. At this point I start another plastic bag for internal goodies. It helps keep everything a little organized. All of the internal parts are going to need to be cleaned fairly well before install. It also makes for a better time working on a clean motor.



You will know need to place the motor up on the back side of the block. You will see a 14mm hex plug right next to the water pump. This will need to come out in order to remove the wrist pins. The wrist pins have to come out because the pistons can not be attached to the rods when the block is seperated.



The other wrist pin plug also needs to come out. This will allow the 1 and 2 cylinder wrist pins to be removed.

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Old 12-05-2007, 06:30 AM   #3
Brydon
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First thing you need to do is rotate the crank until the wrist pins are visible through the access holes. This is at bottom dead center or there abouts. Now take some needle nose plyers and remove the clips that are right up against the wrist pins.



Know the wrist pin can be pulled out. I made a "special" tool for this. What I did was take an old screw driver and bend the end to 90 degrees. Then grind it down to make sure it wouldn't scratch the pistons. You can use a prybar to actually pull up on the head of the screw driver. Subaru sells a tool that is similar with a slide hammer attached to it. It makes life easier but this was free.



Wrist pin, clip, and "special" tool



Once the two front wrist pins are out it is time to move on to the rear wrist pins. My block came with the rear covers removed so you can't see the covers. I will add the pics when I do the RS block. You do have to rotate the crank again until the wrist pins are visible. This would be top dead center but on the rear it is bottomed out.



Oh, look another 14mm hex cover. Take out and you will see the last wrist pins. Remove these pins just like the front two. At this point you can take the pistons out or leave them in. When the block is split it will be easier to remove them but it's all up to you.



At this point you should take off the oilpump and water pump. This is the water pump with all the bolts removed. Place these bolts with the water pump and in a safe location.



This is the oil pump with the bolts removed. Take a mallet an tap on it. That should free the Fugibond that holds it in place.



After the bolts are out you can remove the pump. If it is in good condition you should keep it if it is old or worn you should replace it.



For my build I'm replacing the oil pump with a larger turbo 10mm pump. I thought all RS's were 8mm but it turns out the 05 RS was a 7mm pump. This was placed in the garbage. I would advise that everyone upgrade there pump at this point because it will be a pain to do in the future.



Now the case is ready to split. There are 12mm 12 point bolts that hold the case together. There are also 12mm 6 point bolts that seal the case on the top and a 10mm bolt the is inside block as veiwed from under the oilpan.

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Old 12-05-2007, 06:31 AM   #4
Brydon
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Remember to look for the bolts that are down in the water galleys. my 1/2 drive 12point would not fit down there so I use a 3/8 but they are not as tight as the head bolts. But still a little bit of a pain.



So once you have all the case bolts loose that are inside the coolant passenges There are still a few more. These three on the out side of the case need to be taken out.



Also there are five on the top of the case that need to be taken out.



Don't forget this one in the back of the block behind where the flywheel would sit.



Then there is this little guy in side the engine. It is a 10mm behind where the baffling was.



After all those are free. You can take a rubber mallet and pound on the case until it comes apart. It is held by silicon so it takes a little force but like the pan, do not use something to pry it apart. If it wouldn't come apart on it's own then you forgot a bolt somewhere. After you are done you will have to halves of the case like so.



And this is a picture of the rest of what comes out of the center. I have seperated the rods from the crank because I will end up using the crank but the rods are worthless to me.



This is my motor on a bench in my garage. All ready to go off to the machine shop tomorrow. They will be checking the deck and hot tanking everything so I can start with a clean motor! I will then start on building the shortblock.


Last edited by Brydon; 12-07-2007 at 04:26 AM.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:31 AM   #5
Brydon
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Wow! Doesn't it look so much cleaner than it did when I took it apart? Now the fun begins, you can see the shortblock and crank in this picture. You can also see my nice work bench with shop rags laid down to keep everything as clean as possible. This is a huge deal! Try to keep everything particle free. On first startup all the dust and grime you put into the motor will be running right on your bearings. This can shorten the life of your motor and even scratch bearings as the motor waits for fresh oil to rinse it. This is also on the wrong side of the oil filter so it will have to cycle to the pan before it is filtered.



This is a must for spec'ing out blocks. You need a set of micrometers that can measure the crank/rod/and cylinder bore surfaces. Mine are really old but have been taken car off and still work well. I have been building motors for 10 years and this is one thing I have only needed to buy once.



In the top of this picture you see plasti gauges (I will talk more about these later) then under that is my ACL race bearings in standard bearing tolerance. Under that is new rings from Subaru for my STI pistons.



2 more must haves are assembly lube and Fugibond (or three bond equivalent) ***8230; You don't need Redline Assembly lube but I'm a baller like that.



Now, give yourself some space to start playing with the crank. You are going to need enough room for the crank and rods and bearings and working space. As always keep everything as clean as possible.



In this picture you can see me checking spec on the rod bearing surface of the crank. Spec is 2.0466-2.0472" The way I like to check is by putting the gauge at minimum and making sure I can't get it to slide by the surface and the check the maximum to make sure it clears. Then check that the surface is not warped or out of round by first looking for low spots in the center or outer edges of the surface. Then make sure to check several points all around the surface to make sure it doesn't differ or pass the limits.



Next check the main journals the same way. Spec should be 2.3619-2.3625" ***8230;Making sure again that everything is round and in spec everywhere. Both of these specs are for a standard bearing. If you have had your crank ground I can give you the increased specs if you PM me.



Since most of you will be like me and using used parts make sure that you didn't get screwed. This is a picture of a STI connecting rod. Two things to notice are that the end of the rod is tapered. If it is not tapered it will not fit STI pistons. And of course you got hosed because you just bought some other rod. Number two is the lettering on the pistons. Since they can get mixed up when they were deinstalled or during shipping or even by you. There are two letters on ether side of the rod and cap that will match. In this case it is the KF! If they don't match then you need to find that cap. If you didn't get it then you will have to throw the rod away. These are line board bolted together so each cap is made for specific rods.



This is a picture of the rod apart and an assortment of rod bearings. They are all the same but inspect them for scratches or imperfections. And keep everything clean! Yes I will say this probably 10 more time.



So the next step is to check the bearing to journal clearance. Spec is 0.0008-0.0012" and can be measured with a plasti gauge. For those that have never used a plasti gauge or don't even know what it is I will try to explain. In this picture you can see a very small piece of blue'ish material on the surface of the bearing. This is a plasti gauge! The idea is you place it on the rod and bolt the rod onto the crank. Then you unbolt it and the gauge piece is then sandwiched down onto the bearing. With plasti gauges you get a guide that has different sides on it that correspond to a specific size in inches. I took several pictures but you just couldn't see anything well so I will photoshop something to show.

Last edited by Brydon; 04-16-2008 at 02:12 AM.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:31 AM   #6
Brydon
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After plasti gauging all the connecting rods to make sure they are in spec you will move on to really assembling the crank and rods. Liberally apply assembly lube to all the bearing surfaces front and back. This is the only lubrication your new motor will have as you are first priming it for oil. Also if the motor is going to sit for a bit this will keep any surface rust from forming.



Next you will tighten the rod onto the crank. First finger tighten both sides, then start to tighten with a torque wrench but not to spec just snug it up. I really like to slowly tighten each side so there is not a lot of force on one side more than the other. Spec is 32.9 ft-lbs.



I set mine to about 32.0 and then watch it. But mine reads the max limit after you let off so that's really nice. And it's NASA approved!



Now that you have gone through and done every rod you are ready to put it into the block to check a few more specs before moving on. Make sure the bearing surfaces are dry at this point because you need some more work in a second.



First is thrust clearance. You don't want a DSM so crank walk is bad! The spec is 0.0012-0.0045.



Since I was lazy and didn't really want to show all these steps and they are nearly impossible to see with a camera anyway***8230; So here is the plasti gauge and guide that you will need to purchase. They are super cheap. Like a couple of dollars at any local auto store. Although I find half the people behind the counter don't know what I'm talking about! Like I know this shows no bearings but you will need to put the bearings in and cut small pieces for each bearing surface. Then bolt the crank and block together and unbolt it to check specs. The next pictures show the process with assembly lube but you will get the idea. Just don't add lube! Say it with me boys no lube. ?

Bearing clearance is 0.004-0.0012"



Again add a liberal amount of lube to all surfaces that the bearings will be on. This is your only protection on startup. And again keep everything clean. I like to handle the lube and bearings with a fresh set of gloves. That way I don't contaminate the block or assembly lube with particles. After this is done apply the bearings and lube them as well.



Next place the crank back in the block surface. Oh, I should have mentioned this by now but you need to place the crank in the block half that has the recessed section for o-rings. This way when you install the top half your o-rings don't fall out.



Some how I lost the picture of the next step but I will post the picture from the FSM because it is better anyway. But you now need to put in the three black o-rings and one orange coolant o-ring into the block and fujibond the sealing surfaces. It doesn't take much fujibond and be careful of getting fujibond in the bearings and oil/coolant passages.

Next take your other block half and place it on top of the lower block piece. It will stop at the dowel pins.



Same picture but from the other side. You can see two of the four o-rings in this picture. One orange and one black right next to it.

Last edited by Brydon; 04-16-2008 at 02:13 AM.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:31 AM   #7
Brydon
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You will now need a rubber mallet to help the block come together. This spot is good to help it along.



Also directly hitting the top is good too. I but shop towels on it to keep and particles from going down the bore. After they meet together you will probably see a little fugibond come out the sealing surfaces and now you can move on to bolting it together.



Even if the bolts look odd, I promise they are 12mm 12point bolts.



Before flipping it over tighten these two up snuggly but not to spec.



Then tighten these but not to spec. This is just to hold it together not to torque it down. Or at least not yet.



There is also these two that you will need to snug up. There is also one that should be installed just to the right of these bolts but is not pictured.



The six along the top of the block



And the one in the back of the block. There is also one more small bolt inside the motor that you can access from underneath where the oilpan will go. Sorry this is not pictured. I will also get all the specs and bolting order and pictures up soon!





Last edited by Brydon; 04-16-2008 at 02:14 AM.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:32 AM   #8
Brydon
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Now that all of the rings have be checked and filed if necessary, you can move on to assembling the pistons and rings. In the picture you can see the rings already on. If you bought OEM rings than you will see a "R" on the rings. This should always face up! Also you will see a dot. This will always face forward!



I always start with the bottom oil rings and move up. It makes life easier because you don't have to fight with the larger compression rings. But you can put them on how you like. First start by putting the actual oil ring in. Then you will install the two rings that hold the oil ring in place. There is an upper and lower. The upper will have a tab at the end of it that keeps it from spinning and the lower will be just a smooth ring with no tab. The tab will face up and can only be positioned at (C) or (D). I generally pick (C) because it's easy to remember. That way you do them all and have less of a chance of screwing up. Make sure the expander gap (The actual oil ring) is 180 degrees out. So if like me you pick (C) then the oil ring gap will be at (D) but visa versa if you pick (D). The lower ring gap can then be put in at (E) or (F). This is so you don't have excessive blow-by at startup and break in. Eventually everything spins free after break in but this helps the process.



Now that the oil is done move on to the 2nd compression ring. Again make sure the "R" faces up! Position this Ring at (A) or (B). Which ever you want but make sure the 1st compression ring is at the opposite. That is they should be 180 degrees out from one another. This helps with compression and break in on start up.



Once you have done this to all four pistons you will need to place the circlips in the opposite end of the piston from the access hole. So all of them should be in the center of the block. Also make sure you look at the dots on the top of the pistons. They will all face forward. So the two pistons in the back do not have dots that face towards the flywheel. They all need to face forward.



My ring compressor picture didn't turn out but this is directly after dropping one piston in. You will notice the dot facing towards the front. But basically break out your ring compressor and compress the rings. I like to oil them so they compress smoothly. I even tap around the compressor with a mallet as I compress to make sure they compress smoothly.



As I was doing the next piston I took a picture of how I tap everything down into the cylinder. Basically just keep tapping until you can see the wrist pin holes in the access holes located in the side of the block. At any given time you can only see two wrist pin holes. Make sure the crank is at top or bottom dead center. Meaning the rods are at there lowest and highest positions. I generally do top dead center so I can start with the rear pistons.



If the pistons stop while you are tapping them down do not force anything. You are probably hitting a rod. So from the bottom you can move the rods freely to the center and continue to tap the piston down until you see the wrist pin holes.



Once all the pistons are in you can turn the block up on it's face. I start with the back but you can start where ever. If the motor is at top dead center the rear rods are at the lowest point of there stroke. At this point the crank should spin freely by hand. You can see the wrist pin hole and the rod off center. With the block on it's face the rod will not move unless you move it by hand. So you can center it up easily. Once close to center I use a small piece of I believe 5/8 copper tube to center and straighten the rod to the piston. Basically you need something close to the size of the wristpin that will help you make sure everything is trued up.



Once everything is true you should see a perfectly straight line to the circlip at the other end of the piston.



After that you can just push the wrist pin in. If you are using new parts the wristpins drop right in. But if you are using used parts the wrist pins might not just push in they might require light tapping. You do not need to hit them hard. Just make sure the wrist pin is started and square and tap it down with a mallet. I take a 15mm deep socket and tap on the face of that against the wrist pin. On a few of the wrist pins directly tapping on them is not an option they are recessed to far.

But once the wrist pin is in you can go ahead and put the other circlip in.


Last edited by Brydon; 04-16-2008 at 02:14 AM.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:32 AM   #9
Brydon
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A set of long needle nose pliers help a lot on certain wrist pins.



Success! Make sure the circlip is truly seated and will not pop out! And now you can move on to the other three pistons. Remember when you get the front ones you will need to rotate the crank to bottom dead center. You will probably have to put the crank bolt in to do this. But it will rotate with little effort.



So once you have all the wrist pins in you can move to the rear once again. Since I will be shortly moving this to an engine stand I want the rear done so it never has to come off the stand until it is going in the car. First thing you need to do is put the access plugs back in. Place a little fujibond on the threads to ensure no leaking. Then tighten them up with a 14mm allen to 50.6ft-lbs.



There are also two covers and the rear main that need to go in. The smaller cover has its own gasket but I use fujibond also just to make sure. No one like leaks! The screws are torqued to 4.7ft-lbs but I generally just tighten them up with a large screw driver.



The larger cover will need to be cleaned to make sure it mates well and then fujibond is then applied to the mating surface. You will also have to torque the plate down just the same as the smaller.



After that pound the rear main in and you will be done with the back side. Yay!



Look again you see pistons with the dots all pointing forward. Now set your engine stand up and get ready to move the shortblock.



Move the engine to the engine stand and sit back and admire your hard work. Next you will be working on completing a long block.



If you are ready to continue than make sure that the block matting surface is clean and free of old gasket material.



Place your new fresh gasket on your block making sure that everything aligns and the oil passage is on the correct side. They are reversible so don't screw this up! Also the gaskets are the same from left to right head.


Last edited by Brydon; 04-16-2008 at 02:15 AM.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:32 AM   #10
Brydon
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Now turn your attention to the head. make sure this is free of gasket and oil/water. A razor blade might help you smooth this out but make sure not to nick the head or the block while cleaning.



Place the head back on the block and start the head bolts (Make sure to apply some oil to the threads and washers). Make them snug but don't tighten them yet. I know the picture is crappy but notice the colors on top of the head bolts? The are different. Out of your six there should be two that are different colors. They go in the center. If you are ordering new ones (I generally don't) Subaru will know the two different part numbers.



1) Tighten all bolts to 29 N-m (3.0 kgf-m, 22 ft-lbs) in alphabetical sequence.
2) Then tighten all bolts to 69 N.m (7.0 kgf-m, 51 ft-lbs) in alphabetical sequence.
3) Back off all bolts by 180" first; back them off by 180" again.
4) Tighten the bolts (a) and (b) to 34 N-m (3.5kgf-m, 25 ft-lb).
5) Tighten the bolts (c), (d), (e) and (f) to 15 N.m (1.5 kgf-m, 11 ft-lb).
6) Tighten all bolts by 80 to 90" in alphabetical sequence.
CAUTION: Do not tighten the bolts more than 90".
7) Further tighten all bolts by 80 to 90" in alphabetical sequence.
CAUTION: Ensure the total "re-tightening angle" [in the former two steps], do not exceed 180".



For those that need the real thing. This is A



This is B



This is C



This is D



This is E



This is F



Now do the other head the exact same way and you will have a complete long block again.


Last edited by Brydon; 04-16-2008 at 02:16 AM.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:33 AM   #11
Brydon
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Now it's time to place my oil pump on you will need to place a new gasket in the recessed part of the block.



This is a closer picture you can also see where I started cleaning all of the mating surfaces. Make sure to clean everything so you get a good seal and no leakage.



This is my used oil pump. I would say get a new one if you are doing this but this has low mileage and I know where it came from. It is a STI pump off my L that has low miles. If you look in the center of the picture you will see a "10" cast into the pump. This is the size of the pump. All the turbo cars got 10mm pumps while the NA cars received 7mm or 8mm pumps. If you are going turbo then now is the time to step up to the larger pump.



After cleaning the mating surface you need to apply a small amount of fujibond. You don't need much because these are machined surfaces that will mate together. I usually smooth it out with my finger so there is just a slight coating. Now you are ready to put the pump on the block.



You will need to align the pump to the shaft of the crank or it will not fit on correctly. The pump spins freely so this is easy. Then snug up the bolts making sure everything mates correctly. The torque spec is 4.7ft-lbs so it doesn't take much to brake one of these bolts.



The pump is on and you can see I installed the front two wrist pin plugs. Like before you need to put a little fujibond on the threads to make sure nothing leaks.



More to come soon. I forgot to buy a water pump gasket and my modified oil pan is still on the RS so I stopped here but it is basically back together other than a timing belt.

Last edited by Brydon; 04-16-2008 at 02:16 AM.
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Old 12-05-2007, 06:35 AM   #12
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This last one is just because I got in a pattern of clicking new post. but who knows maybe I'll need it?

Also any input is appreciated. Not only that but I will be taking lots of pics when the motor comes out and when I'm building the turbo kit. Right now it's a gt32 twin scroll kit with stock STI cat back. I like a quiet daily driver that has 350whp. What can I say. I want it all!
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Old 12-06-2007, 10:10 AM   #13
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nice write up, what EM are u using? are you including the new part install pictures (like rods etc.) thx

choung
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Old 12-06-2007, 10:19 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by illegal2.2 View Post
nice write up, what EM are u using? are you including the new part install pictures (like rods etc.) thx

choung
Yes it will also include how to use platigauges and determine roundness of cylinders and file rings and basically build any motor. I just have to keep working on the project. But now I have two projects, since my L threw a rod, so it has been going slowly.
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Old 12-06-2007, 12:49 PM   #15
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very nice work and documentation
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Old 12-06-2007, 02:25 PM   #16
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good work. Maybe ill document my engine assemmbly so then we'll have your engine teardown and my engine assembly.lol.
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Old 12-07-2007, 12:58 AM   #17
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Subscribed...
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Old 12-07-2007, 01:06 AM   #18
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hey brydon think you could make another wrist pin remover? and i will be using this write up as i do mine.
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Old 12-07-2007, 01:15 AM   #19
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propane torch, hammer, anvil, and a spare flathead screwdriver... make your own.

I used a piece of cyclone fence wire......dont say it...




but it worked....


~Josh~
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Old 12-07-2007, 03:55 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ballitch View Post
propane torch, hammer, anvil, and a spare flathead screwdriver... make your own.

I used a piece of cyclone fence wire......dont say it...




but it worked....


~Josh~
I like where your heads at! To be honest the subaru one is really nice because it has a slide hammer on the end but mine was free. And you described exactly how I made mine. Except I had an extra wrist pin so I ground the end to make sure it wouldn't hurt the piston by being to deep.
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Old 12-07-2007, 04:10 AM   #21
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I used a long allen wrench and just cut the end off of the short side until it fit through the hole. Vice grips help for a stubborn one.
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Old 12-07-2007, 04:27 AM   #22
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I updated the first posts. I will be sending it off to the machine shop tomorrow to check flatness and have it hot tanked. Will be nice to work with clean parts.
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Old 12-07-2007, 01:44 PM   #23
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hey brydon I sent you a pm the other day jw if you got it, I have some Q's for ya
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Old 12-07-2007, 02:38 PM   #24
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awesome details, i bought a 2.5 block lookin to do somehting like this, can u PM me a shortcut to this link , thanks
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Old 12-07-2007, 03:06 PM   #25
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Brydon, what are you using for engine management that would fit under your budget? Build looks good though, I may do the same.

-Chad
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