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Old 01-08-2019, 07:16 AM   #1
AVANTI R5
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Default Ford wants all of its cars to ‘talk’ and ‘listen’ to each other by 2022



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Ford wants all of its cars to ‘talk’ and ‘listen’ to each other by 2022

Ford C-V2X explains



Several companies will demonstrate C-V2X (cellular vehicle-to-everything) communications technology developed by Qualcomm at CES 2019. But Ford may be the most aggressive in bringing C-V2X to market. The Detroit automaker will add it to every new car and truck sold in the United States by 2022, Don Butler, executive director for Ford connected vehicle platform and product, wrote in a blog post.


C-V2X is the latest incarnation of so-called vehicle-to-everything (V2X), a communications technology that allows cars to “talk” to each other and infrastructure. The claimed advantage of this technology is that it can warn a driver of things beyond his or her line of sight. If a car is stopped at an intersection with poor visibility, it could, for example, pick up signals from other V2X-equipped cars or sensors mounted on nearby buildings to tell the driver if it’s okay to go.

Vehicles could also communicate with stoplights, telling drivers when a light is about to change. Audi already offers this in the form of its Traffic Light Information system. The system gives a countdown when a light is about to turn green, but it only works in a handful of cities (Audi also offers a built-in toll transponder that relies on V2X tech). Aptiv has placed sensors on traffic lights in Las Vegas to guide its self-driving cars, even when they’re onboard cameras don’t have a direct line of sight to the light.

Ford could take things even further, Butler wrote. C-V2X could be integrated with driver aids, like those in Ford’s recently introduced Co-Pilot360 suite. Or it could be added to self-driving cars. Emergency vehicles could be equipped with C-V2X transmitters, allowing cars to detect their presence and move out of the way.

The difference between the C-V2X tech embraced by Ford and previous systems is that it’s based on 5G. All other V2X systems to date have used a competing setup called dedicated short range communications (DSRC). But that means Ford will have to rely on the smooth rollout of 5G. Even the rollout of DSRC-based V2X vehicles and infrastructure has been slow, and DSRC is based on a more familiar technology derived from Wi-Fi.

“A conducive regulatory environment must be in place for C-V2X to be deployed, which is why we are working just as much with industry and government organizations to create such a technology-neutral environment,” Butler wrote in his blog post. He also told Bloomberg that he hopes other automakers will adopt C-V2X alongside Ford. He added that C-V2X is a simpler solution because telecom companies are already spending billions on 5G cell towers and antennas, while DSRC would require a separate government investment.

Despite the potential hurdles, Qualcomm expects C-V2X and other related technologies to become a major part of its business. The company believes that, within five years, 75 percent of cars will have some form of connectivity. A critical mass of vehicles will be needed to realize the technology’s full benefit, since cars that aren’t equipped with C-V2X or similar systems can’t communicate with each other. The more cars on the network, the more effective it is.
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Old 01-08-2019, 07:18 AM   #2
AVANTI R5
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Default C-V2X system helps cars navigate intersections

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C-V2X system helps cars navigate intersections, even without a line of sight

Autonomous driving is a hot topic at CES 2019 this year, and a new C-V2X (cellular vehicle-to-everything) deployment from Qualcomm will be shown off by Audi, Ford, and Ducati. V2X stands for vehicle-to-everything, and is a form of short-range communication that can be sent and received by both cars and infrastructure. Qualcomm announced that it aims to accelerate commercial deployment of C-V2X by hosting a live demo of the technology in Las Vegas.

The demonstrations will feature both Audi and Ford vehicles, as well as Ducati Multistrada 1260 motorcycles, all of which are equipped with C-V2X technology which uses Qualcomm’s9150 C-V2X chipset.


The vehicles will demonstrate how the technology works in the example of a four-way intersection without traffic signals, showing how the vehicles can behave co-cooperatively to negotiate right of way and deal with conditions where the driver has no line of sight to the object they are avoiding. The no-line-of-sight case is exactly the kind of situation where C-V2X can benefit drivers in terms of safety and convenience.

Other safety scenarios to be demonstrated include vehicles interacting with other vehicles, vehicles avoiding pedestrians, and vehicles navigating around infrastructure. In particular, the companies want to demonstrate the Intersection Movement Assist (IMA) feature which should prevent vehicles from running into each other in angle collisions at intersections.

An advantage of the C-V2X format is that it will work with 5G and offer backward compatibility, so it should keep up with current trends by the time it is commercially available. And the aim of the technology is not only on collision avoidance. “Besides additional safety, C-V2X is designed to also improve comfort and efficiency, which can be applied to both current and future autonomous driving,” said Anupam Malhotra, director of connected vehicles and data at Audi of America Inc.

There is also a public installation of C-V2X technology in Las Vegas, where the Regional Transportation Commission of Southern Nevada (RTC) has teamed up with Qualcomm to install C-V2X enabled roadside units on select roadways in the city. The trial program will allow the testing of the units in the real world and also give the public what is likely its first chance to see and interact with the technology.
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Old 01-08-2019, 08:42 AM   #3
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Quote:
"A conducive regulatory environment must be in place for C-V2X to be deployed, which is why we are working just as much with industry and government organizations to create such a technology-neutral environment,” Butler wrote in his blog post. He also told Bloomberg that he hopes other automakers will adopt C-V2X alongside Ford. He added that C-V2X is a simpler solution because telecom companies are already spending billions on 5G cell towers and antennas, while DSRC would require a separate government investment."
Agreed, especially if from within a car, you know there's a person somewhere in the vicinity. Police using their cruisers to find people in buildings, becuase it's built into the phone?

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Old 01-08-2019, 09:15 AM   #4
littledrummerboy
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This really is the way to go -- I hope it catches on with all the other manufacturers soon. With the way all these non-standard, proprietary autonomous aids and reactive safety things are making its way into cars, it really can't work as well as cars talking to each other.
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