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Old 12-02-2019, 06:39 AM   #1
AVANTI R5
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Default 3 Game Changing Electric Vehicle Technologies

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Millions of electric cars are to hit the market next year as every self-respecting carmaker submits its lineup of plug-in vehicles for the environmentally conscious. Sales forecasts for these electric gems vary but tend to be generally optimistic, so carmakers’ hopes run high.

There is just one small problem with this perfect picture: range anxiety.

Very much like storage for renewable energy, range in electric vehicles has become the top priority and with it, charging times. In fact, it is quite possible that charging times will overtake range in terms of importance soon. If you can charge your EV in five minutes, it becomes less of a worry whether its range is 200 or 250 miles, all driven in the city.

No wonder then that the charging systems field is currently bustling with activity, producing game-changing inventions in electric vehicle charging such as wireless charging, superfast chargers, and advancing vehicle-to-grid technology, which has the added benefit of moving electricity both ways. Here are our top 3 innovations for EV charging:

#1 Wireless charging

This is one of the more fascinating concepts in what Car Magazine’s Curtis Moldrich (see article below) has called an arms race for carmakers. Similar to wireless phone charging, wireless charging can work for cars in parking lots or even on highways.

Here, speed of charging is not of the essence. According to Qualcomm, which has developed tech dubbed Halo, wireless charging can change the picture entirely. Why sit at a charger for even five minutes if you can drive on a highway that charges your car as you drive? Who even needs a charger if your car can charge just sitting in the parking lot with a dish-sized pad underneath to receive the juice?

Wireless charging for EVs works on the same principle as wireless charging for smartphones: magnetic induction. It involves two pads—one on the car and one on the floor of the garage or parking lot—that need to be aligned so charging will begin. It can be done at speeds of 3.3 kW, 6.6 kW, or 20 kW. Now, this may not be particularly fast, but speed is not the point. Convenience is. You leave the car in the garage and it charges overnight with no need to monitor the process.

Wireless charging sounds pretty cool, but it will be a while until it becomes standard practice thanks to competing technology and the race for faster and faster charging times.

#2 The 3-Minute Charge

So far the fastest in this field seems to be the three-minute charging tech developed by Porsche and BMW. This is the time their charger takes to supply an EV with enough juice for 62 miles. It works with a capacity of 450 kW, which is three times the capacity of Tesla’s Supercharger, but there is one small problem. Current EVs cannot take this kind of power, so the tech was tested on specially developed vehicles. These recharged to 80 percent in 15 minutes.

One would think it’s a little inconvenient to have chargers that cannot work with the EVs that need recharging, but once the charging tech is there, future EVs will be developed in such a way as to be able to take the power of the charger. Affordability, of course, is a whole other topic.

#3 Vehicle-to-Grid Tech

While we wait for EVs capable of taking a charge at 450 kW, other companies are working on vehicle-to-grid technology. Imagine millions of EVs that charge from the grid when there is excess output and release back unused juice to the grid at peak hours. Also, many believe that car batteries can be used as household battery packs, collecting and storing power from renewable installations.

The road ahead is long and winding, but a growing number of businesses are taking it. The key seems to be managed charging, or smart charging. This prevents an overload on the grid in case too many people are charging their EVs at the same time, which tends to happen during peak electricity demand periods. Smart charging systems simply stop charging vehicles when peak demand is reached to avoid the overload. But that’s grid-to-vehicle. What about the other way around?

One company has developed what it calls the first bidirectional charger for the home. Wallbox’s Quasar, according to the company, can feed energy from an electric car to the home or to the grid. It can also work as a charger for the car. The idea certainly makes sense, reducing energy waste considerably and alleviating the load on the grid once there are enough EVs to use it.

Speaking of grid load, there are companies focusing on load distribution in EV chargers specifically. After all, fast is good, but fast and reliable is better. Just a few days ago, an EV charger exploded in New Zealand and while the initial investigation found the charger was faulty, load is a force to be reckoned with.

SolarEdge is one of the companies aiming to make EV charging more reliable through managing the load on the system and allowing for multiple chargers to work on a single circuit without overloading it. The best part of SolarEdge’s systems is that they are flexible. “We will do a round-robin type of charging scheme, or divide the power between all cars or first-come, first-serve or different types of solutions so you won’t over-consume, but you will still deliver power to all cars,” founder Lior Handelsman told Clean Technica.

The EV industry is moving ahead in leaps and bounds, it seems. In fact, it is moving so fast it may need to take a breather. While range anxiety is a real problem and fast charging times are the solution, safety concerns should not be underestimated, either, especially now that many EV sales forecasts suggest that some carmakers are way ahead of themselves with their EV plans.

"The industry is cutting corners in the race to get energy density, faster charging and longer cycle life," an analyst from IDTechEx said at a recent industry event. "The fires will continue," Peter Harrop said ominously.


What is wireless electric car charging? EV tech explainedWhat is wireless electric car charging? EV tech explained

► Charging EVs without wires
► EV charging will become 'splash-and-dash' behaviour
► Coming to spec sheets in around two years

EV range, and more specifically battery size, has developed into an arms race for car makers, with new electric cars coming in thick and fast with updated powertrains. Fast-charging is very much on the horizon – just look at the Porsche Taycan, for example – but right now, the longer your range, the better. But the real solution to range anxiety could have nothing to do with range at all; it could be solved by wireless charging.

Yes, it's a sideways step in terms of thinking, but a step forward in terms of ease of use. While we waitsfor incremental cell improvements and the possibility of solid state tech, Qualcomm believes wireless charging – similar to that in modern smartphones – is the magic bullet for range worries.

It's not fast by any means, but that's not the point. Rather than topping up quickly and less frequently, Qualcomm has bed EV charging behaviour will become a constant splash-and-dash process, with wireless charging being the ideal way to do it.

From garage floors that’ll charge your EV without you lifting a finger, to motorways that can power your car and propel it at the same time, wireless charging opens up a whole new approach to power management. And it might actually work.

What is wireless car charging and how does it work?



If you’ve bought a high-end smartphone in the past few months, you’ll probably be familiar with wireless charging. Just like it sounds, it’s a simple way of putting charge into your phone without the need for cables – and Qualcomm’s Halo technology is essentially a scaled-up version.

It relies on resonant magnetic induction to transfer energy between a pad on the ground, and another under the floor of a compatible EV. The charging pad is around a metre square, while the car’s receiving pad is enclosed in a smaller, dinner dish-sized device under the car. Once the two are aligned, charging can take place at 3.3kW, 6.6kW or 20kW speeds.

Does it actually work? We tested it to find out

Two versions of Qualcomm’s Halo tech are currently fitted to the Formula E Safety Car and Medical car: a constantly developed one on the former, and an early beta version on the latter, just to test the effect of wear and tear.

At the ePrix in Paris, CAR magazine was shown just how Qualcomm’s wireless charging system works, and it’s actually pretty simple for the user; a smartphone app complete with intuitive graphics made it easy to align both pads.

It’s worth mentioning here that while we may see the technology in other cars, it’ll probably be contained in OEM apps or infotainment systems wearing the brand of the manufacturer. This Qualcomm demonstration is what’s currently being shown to car makers, and it’d then be customised and reskinned later down the development process.

After alignment was complete, charging began once the ignition was off. While 20kW isn’t as fast as the ridiculous rapid-charge speeds Porsche, Audi, Tesla and others are quoting, it’s important to remember the use case here is completely different.

Qualcomm’s Halo tech also comes with some built in safety features, so if any foreign objects are located between the charging pads, the system will shut off automatically. At that point, the EV owner would be contacted, and asked to secure the connection.

When is wireless car charging coming?



Qualcomm is using Formula E to develop and advertise its wireless charging tech, but it’ll be a couple of years before you see Halo on your EV’s spec sheet. Qualcomm licenses the technology instead of manufacturing it, but recent tier two wins mean it should be entering the market via OEMs in around 18 to 24 months from now.

BMW will begin building its world-first production-ready inductive charging systems in July 2018 – and it’s set to work with many of the firm’s plug-in hybrid models (PHEVs). It'll consist of two parts - a Groundpad and a Carpad in BMW parlance - with the former sitting on the ground below your plug-in hybrid and the latter connecting to the car's electrical backbone. BMW claims a 3.5-hour charge is possible with a charge rate of ‘up to 3.2kW’, and at around 85% efficiency between the pad and the car.

There’s no indication yet when the tech hits UK BMW showrooms at this point, or indeed how much it’ll cost until market-specific details arrive; we’re told before the end of summer 2018. But BMW sources told CAR magazine that the tech is indeed headed for right-hand drive markets, and will be available exclusively on a leasing deal with a 5-series 530e iPerformance.

The reason behind the leasing stipulation is a simple matter of economics – the overwhelming majority of plug-in 5-ers in Western Europe are ‘owned’ this way, so it stands to reason that the best way of introducing this relatively expensive range anxiety-busting tech is to use the same financing model for this.

And after that?

While static wireless charging is the main aim, Qualcomm is already looking to develop the technology further for moving vehicles too – and that’s where things get even more interesting. Dynamic charging, or charging while in motion, is the next step, and could change how we see EV batteries forever.

If a wireless charging infrastructure is able to provide a constant stream of power to an EV, a large battery wouldn’t be needed for most journeys – just a small one for patchier infrastructure. Qualcomm believes quick charging could still be used, though, and the future will probably see a combination of both rapid wired and wireless charging for EV owners.

Dynamic wireless charging tech would probably be easier to implement in urban areas first, so EVs would only need batteries for intercity journeys – where larger quick charging stations are already planned.

We’ll update this article when there are more developments on wireless charging tech in the automotive field.
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Old 12-02-2019, 12:40 PM   #2
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major tech change battery tech needed. You'll see that change in cell phones first so forget these promises I've heard since Jimmie Carter electric car days.
when you can drop you phone on a pad and have it charge in under 5min but last 3 days then autos will follow in next years but at very high cost at first.
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Old 12-02-2019, 12:40 PM   #3
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major tech change battery tech needed. You'll see that change in cell phones first so forget these promises I've heard since Jimmie Carter electric car days.
when you can drop you phone on a pad and have it charge in under 5min but last 3 days then autos will follow in next years but at very high cost at first.
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Old 12-02-2019, 02:06 PM   #4
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Only changes batteries need are charging speed and (maybe) max charge degradation improvements.

And a standard forking plug so we get this charging network in place faster.
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Old 12-02-2019, 02:23 PM   #5
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Its funny they say the problem is range anxiety and charging times. I don't think that's true though. Lots of high range vehicles available, and charging is only a problem for those without garages to charge overnight, or if you're taking road trip routes without chargers on the way.

The problem is the cost to get that high range EV. Get an EV model to cost as much as the same ICE model or at least close to it without rebates -- THAT is the game changer needed.
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Old 12-02-2019, 08:38 PM   #6
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Its funny they say the problem is range anxiety and charging times. I don't think that's true though. Lots of high range vehicles available, and charging is only a problem for those without garages to charge overnight, or if you're taking road trip routes without chargers on the way.

The problem is the cost to get that high range EV. Get an EV model to cost as much as the same ICE model or at least close to it without rebates -- THAT is the game changer needed.
Well, they continue to do surveys as to why people are not buying EV’s and range anxiety / recharge stations and times continues to be a top reason. That said, I do also agree with your point. EV’s are still too expensive for the majority of people. I think another reason is that in the past 3 years, there have been a ton of autos sold (this year has been down over last year) and to try and convince people to shell out more money on a new car when they still have a relatively new low mileage one is not financially feasible for a lot of people nor is it financially a smart move.

Also, the current options for EV vehicles suck so there’s that.
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Old 12-02-2019, 10:21 PM   #7
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Range anxiety is a myth.... People are just misinformed and they don't understand the technology. Time will change that . The Tesla options do not suck and that's why they are the best selling vehicles even compared to gasoline cars in the same class.
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Old 12-02-2019, 04:32 PM   #8
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The vehicle to grid tech holds a lot of promise. Would replace the need for short-term generators. Would let home owners reduce their peak demand loads to help reduce their electricity bills. Charge up while it's cheap, use the electricity from the car to offset those peak load rates. The car can start doing more than just acting as a transportation appliance.
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Old 12-03-2019, 04:00 PM   #9
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Range anxiety is an issue, if it's your 3rd car and mostly used as a commuter and you own your own home then it's not much of an issue (and you don't mind paying for a 240v outlet to be installed from your panel to your garage/car port). If you live in an apartment and it's your only car on a 50-100 mile daily commute its a big issue.

Second major issue is cost, they just cost more than an equivalent gas counterpart that doesn't have any restrictions/require any additional thought.

Third issue is choice, there are a plethora of vehicles either gas or hybrid to choose from in lots of different shapes and sizes. BEV's tend to be small hatchbacks, luxury cars or expensive small CUV's.

In time things will change but it just hasn't gotten there for many people yet.

I could totally see myself in a BEV once I retire but that's a number of years from now, I'll drive a lot less and it won't be my only car.
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Old 12-03-2019, 04:55 PM   #10
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You are all forgetting the real reason people are not buying EV in quantity. There is no actual reason to get one. Gas is not expensive, gas cars are not going anywhere. There is absolutely zero reason for most poeple to switch. It is something different with obvious drawbacks that you must swallow. But if you stop and think people are asking why are you not buying an EV as if you needed a reason to NOT buy one. You simply have no reason to switch from something that has been working for 100 years.

Until they are better with zero drawbacks and are cheaper, what is the compelling reason to spend more for less.

Also most EV that are affordable do suck. Including the fischer price interior model 3
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Old 12-03-2019, 05:04 PM   #11
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You are all forgetting the real reason people are not buying EV in quantity. There is no actual reason to get one. Gas is not expensive, gas cars are not going anywhere. There is absolutely zero reason for most poeple to switch. It is something different with obvious drawbacks that you must swallow. But if you stop and think people are asking why are you not buying an EV as if you needed a reason to NOT buy one. You simply have no reason to switch from something that has been working for 100 years.

Until they are better with zero drawbacks and are cheaper, what is the compelling reason to spend more for less.

Also most EV that are affordable do suck. Including the fischer price interior model 3
I think I mentioned it in this thread or another EV thread but the EV switch will take a long time. Most people simply don't trade in a vehicle and pay more money just because. For most, its just a means of transportation and until that vehicle becomes old or starts requiring costly repairs outside of warranty, there really isn't a compelling reason to buy one.

I think this will be a gradual change over the next 25 years with possibly full EV car sales only in 35-45 years.
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Old 12-03-2019, 05:34 PM   #12
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CAN WE PLEASE get a 3rd sub N&R just for EVs?

Subaru N&R

Non N&R

EV N&R

It was nice to have all the Tesla news gathered into one thread. Now I think it's time to have a place where it can all live and everyone agrees to keep it there.
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Old 12-03-2019, 06:47 PM   #13
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CAN WE PLEASE get a 3rd sub N&R just for EVs?

Subaru N&R

Non N&R

EV N&R

It was nice to have all the Tesla news gathered into one thread. Now I think it's time to have a place where it can all live and everyone agrees to keep it there.
I’ll create and merge when I get home.
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Old 12-04-2019, 12:14 PM   #14
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Forgetting to plug in your charger is like forgetting to wipe your ass, just dumb as all get out. I ran the Leaf as my only car for 3 years and I never forgot to charge it once. If you are a forgetful person, lay the damn L2 cable right in front of the parking spot. That’s what I did. And it had a range of 84 miles not the 200+ a Tesla does.
That's you. Great that you never forgot also most likely you'd be screwed if you did with only 84 miles of range so you had to.

Problem is people are busy, **** happens, you forget. With a gas car you say Oh **** the gas light is on and you pull into a station and refill.

Not everyone has 2-3 cars nor do they want to rent a car.

Range anxiety is only one issue out of a multitude of issues with the current selection of BEV's. They are not cost effective unless you get a lease deal on a under 100mile range subcompact which few people want.

When you have BEV Rav 4s, Honda Pilots, Kia Tellurides and similar with 300-400 miles of range that cost about the same as gas or hybrid counterparts then you will see more people buy them.

What's the point of buying something that costs more that comes with restrictions on how and when you can use it?
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Old 12-04-2019, 03:05 PM   #15
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What's the point of buying something that costs more that comes with restrictions on how and when you can use it?
Buy used or buy a lease. I leased first for $200 a month then bought it at lease end for $6700. If you are talking about a 50k Tesla, I 100% agree with you.
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Old 12-04-2019, 06:00 PM   #16
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Buy used or buy a lease. I leased first for $200 a month then bought it at lease end for $6700. If you are talking about a 50k Tesla, I 100% agree with you.
I know you got a good deal and spent wisely but a 1st gen leaf is not what many are looking for. Yes in certain regions BEVs are probably doing well, I see lots of Model 3's and a few bolts but the overwhelming majority are trucks, SUVs and CUVs with a few sedans and hatches mixed in.

CUV's are what people are buying, it is what I'll be buying next as it's still my turn to have the family vehicle. There isn't a BEV Pallisade or similar for the same price or less. If the microbus had been out I might have thought of it as the styling and practicality (if the price was right) would have been tempting.
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Old 12-04-2019, 05:35 PM   #17
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How about reversing the question?

I'm looking to replace my daily driver.
Perhaps spend around $20,000...and I've no issue spending much less, as it's going to be carrying all my surf gear to the beach.

Why should I buy an electric car? (not being sarcastic)

My only requirement: Vehicle must be a hatchback.

Daily roundtrip to work, the beach and home is around 30 miles.
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Old 12-05-2019, 04:47 AM   #18
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How about reversing the question?

I'm looking to replace my daily driver.
Perhaps spend around $20,000...and I've no issue spending much less, as it's going to be carrying all my surf gear to the beach.

Why should I buy an electric car? (not being sarcastic)

My only requirement: Vehicle must be a hatchback.

Daily roundtrip to work, the beach and home is around 30 miles.
Jealous AF. I have to fly to OGG to do the same but it’s like a divorce, it costs because it’s worth it. I’m still on knee to chest for a few years, and won’t go without my friends on the island. Their break I get a pass for being a Haole because I’m with them.

A used Leaf is just your game. $10-12k, low mileage. Little to no maintenance. kWh cheaper than gas. This newer model with more range should be depreciating to low 20k range pretty quick (haven’t checked). Previous gen, make sure it’s a 2013 or up. The Nissan service people laugh when I take it in for annual state inspection. I always ask “what needs to be done” regarding service and they laugh. It’ll take the miles off your nicer machinery. It’s my donkey in the fleet. Best DD I have ever owned. Hatch, you can put a rack on top for the boards. Parks easy, just make sure to get one with the all around cameras. They make parking right next to a curb a one inch deal with no wheel/curb rash. And people think you eat Kale and hate firearms so you are running totally incognito.
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