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Old 08-28-2022, 07:40 PM   #1
AVANTI R5
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Default 2022 Moto Guzzi V7




2022 Moto Guzzi V7

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MG products are instantly recognized by their transverse-mount V-twin engines. This new generation of V7 Stone is no exception. Built to meet Euro 5 emissions standards, the new “Eight-Fifty” runs with an 84 mm bore and 77 mm stroke to boost the overall displacement to 853 cc.



This brings a concurrent increase in power output to the tune of 25 percent with a slight boost in torque. The 850 engine in the Moto Guzzi Stone V7 produces 65 horsepower and 53.8 pound-feet of torque.

That’s up from 52/44 respectively from the previous version, and according to the factory, over 80 percent of that overall grunt is available at the 3,000 rpm mark. This is unsurprising as V-twin engines like the V7, are usually pretty torquey in general. For our cousins across the pond, an A2-compliant version is available for riders who are on the tiered license progression.



Redesigned cases deliver greater rigidity with a deep-sump oil collector and dual oil pumps for pressure and positive recovery, even in deep lean angles. A pushrod-and-rocker type valvetrain times a pair of poppets per head with a number of aluminum components that keep the top ends simple and light.
This attention to weight continues into the piston themselves as well as the wrist pins. The reduced diameter of the pins down to a diameter of 20 mm reduces reciprocating weight.

Power flows through a standard clutch and six-speed transmission before heading to the rear wheel via a double-jointed driveshaft with a V7 Stone top speed of 110 mph. A switchable traction control feature comes with two levels of intervention plus “Off” to give you some control over the safety equipment.



Design

The differences between the Stone and Centenario come down, essentially, to color choices. The overall build is the same across the board. Both rock plenty of blackout treatment, but the Stone comes with a choice of four colors shot on the tank and front fender in black, copper, yellow, and gray.

The Centenario has green at the front fender and side covers, and gray at the tank with a brown seat cover instead of black. A solo round headlight housing carries LED projectors for both high- and low beams. In addition, there’s an eagle-shaped DRL feature for daytime safety.

New for this year, the digital display in a round housing acts as the rider’s interface for the safety electronics. It connects to the Moto Guzzi MIA service through your smartphone. The 5.5-gallon fuel tank draws from its forebears with the little head-shed outcroppings designed to visually fair off the protruding engine tops a bit.

A narrow waist meets the pinched rear of the fuel tank. The narrow entry of the two-up seat props up your passenger on a faux tuck-and-roll pad with subframe-mount, flip-up footpegs to complete the kit.

A blackout rear fender mounts the gear in the rear with the license plate used to extend the coverage. Overall, the Stone E5 maintains the classic look associated with the V7 line, and so most of the improvements are under the hood, as it were.

Chassis

The tubular frame on the V7 Stone is ALS steel in a double-downtube/double-cradle type unit. A new, larger, yoke-style swingarm doubles as a shaft housing for the final drive. Cast wheels round out the rolling chassis. They come lined with a 100/90-18 ahead of a 150/70-17 in a street tread pattern.

Wet weight is just under 500 pounds, so perhaps the single front brake is sufficient. It runs a 320 mm disc with a four-bore, opposed-piston Brembo caliper to provide most of the stopping power. It’s followed by a 260 mm disc and twin-cylinder anchor out back.

Plain vanilla suspension floats the front end on 40 mm pipes. The rear end sports dual coil-over shocks that come with adjustable preload as the only tweak. ABS protection comes stock to finish out the electronics suite.
2022 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone E5 Price and Availability

Regardless of which colorway you pick, you’ll pay the same price. The base-model 2022 Moto Guzzi V7 Stone E5 costs $8,990. The limited-edition Centenario, available only for 2021, costs $9,190.


Competitors


Moto Guzzi finds immediate competition in the U.S. market from domestic giant Harley-Davidson. It goes head-to-head with the 2022 Iron 883.
Harley-Davidson Iron 883

A member of the Sportster family, the Iron 883 carries itself with much the same poise as its Italian counterpart. It has lots of that standard/cruiser vibe to go around.

Blackout treatment starts the connection to the custom world, much like the Stone, but takes it further. The drilled-out front fender uprights and belt guard shed weight for the sake of performance.

A single round headlight and round instrument gauge ride on the front of the Sporty. Out back, the license plate holder is offset to the left side to make for a cleaner rear end. The cut-down rear fender carries a small but effective taillight bar that does nothing to diminish that clean look.


If you like to share the fun with a friend, the H-D comes up short with a solo saddle and no passenger footpegs. You’ll have to go out of pocket post-sale whereas the Stone is good to go.

Harley claims 54 pounds o’ grunt, and the engine is a proven plant. This style of Sportster engine first saw the light of day in 1986 and is a reliable performer.
You’ll pay for that pedigree to the tune of $11,249 to leave the Moto Guzzi with a significant advantage at the checkout. H-D has no answer to the ’Guzzi’s traction control, and ABS is an $819 addition if you want it.
He Said

“Well, what’s not to like? I mean, it’s pretty much a Sportster with a sideways engine. It just has technology such as traction control to set it apart.”
“It’s clear that ’Guzzi intends you to ride the V7 the same way as a Sportster. At the end of the day, with much the same handling and performance profile, it’s a natural competitor for the same slice of the market.”
She Said

My wife and fellow motorcycle writer, Allyn Hinton, says, “Whether you are new to two wheels or have many miles behind you, the new V7 Stone is a joy to ride. The engine is derived from the one that powers the TT85, though it isn’t a straight-up transplant. There is no Ride-by-Wire, but there are enough basic electronic goodies to make riding suitable for beginners.”
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Old 08-29-2022, 03:31 PM   #2
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I wish some of the Italian brands had more of a footprint in the states. Ducati is pretty good with their dealer network but makes like Moto Guzzi, MV Agusta, Aprilia and Piaggio are almost non-existent except in major markets where they have a few dealers.

I'm not in fly-over states and the closest MV Agusta dealer for me is over 3 hours away.

Until they can improve their dealer network and the image of unreliability they are goig to be mostly irrelevant in the US.

It can be done, just look at Royal Enfield. They had very little US market and now there are probably 4 dealers with in a hour or so drive of me.
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Old 08-29-2022, 03:31 PM   #3
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Duplicate, swear I only clicked once.

Last edited by Genericuser1; 08-29-2022 at 04:36 PM. Reason: Duplicate, swear I only clicked once.
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Old 08-29-2022, 03:57 PM   #4
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cool bike, but like mentioned above there's just no market presence.

It's also a little underpowered compared to its competitors in the US market.

I'll stick with my cafe'd out yami for now. Reliable, good dealer networks, local tuning options, lots of parts available, and more power. Doesn't have quite the same presence as this one, but my mods definitely make it stand out.
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Old 08-30-2022, 03:41 AM   #5
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It's $2,000 cheaper than the Iron, as pointed out in the article, and makes a lot more power than the HD. For a midsize aircooled engine, 65hp is perfectly acceptable. It's basically still just occupying the hole in the market left by the 865 Bonneville ever since Triumph decided to watercool their new classics.

As for reliability.. these are pretty well proven designs. Guzzi has been making this same basic bike since the late 60s. There's not much to break.

Most folks buying a new Guzzi aren't shopping for their only daily-rider bike.. this is their 2nd or 3rd bike. They can wait for parts to arrive.
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Old 08-30-2022, 12:18 PM   #6
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I guess there's more of a nostalgia factor going with the air-cooled v-twin. Just not my style. I'd much rather take a water cooled modern bike than a guzzi or hd. I'd much rather put my money into a do-it-all bike like a scrambler or the xsr that I currently own. Been thinking of going up to the honda cb1000r at some point but they're impossible to find.
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Old 08-30-2022, 09:21 PM   #7
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Air cooled bikes are great. I miss my Bonneville so much and really regret selling it. They're only disappearing because they take forever to get up to operating temp when the weather is cold, so emissions rules are pushing up against them. 65hp is plenty for having some fun on the street. That's a 0-60 in the low 5s and a 13s quarter. About the same as a Kawasaki Ninja 500R, but with a fat midrange torque band. Outclassed by a lot of modern machines, but that's not the point.
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Old 08-30-2022, 09:34 PM   #8
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I primarily use my bike in summer time commuting situations, so air cooled doesn't work for me. Works for some people, especially if it's not their only bike as you mentioned.

My 700cc puts out 74hp stock, but it's tuned and likely pushing closer to 85 now. Pretty fun on the street and plenty adequate but I wouldn't mind a little more oomph. Scrambler is similar in power output. All three bikes have a similar classic motorcycle design to them.

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Old 08-31-2022, 12:37 PM   #9
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It would just be nice to have a few more options and when you have to travel hours to a dealer it's not an option. Some of the new Guzzi's look like fun and I'd really like to look at a Superveloce in person.

My main bike is air/oil cooled and I run it in summer and winter (as long as its above 35). My 2nd is air cooled and is running fine as well although I will add an oil cooler to it once one is available. It's a modded 125cc Monkey so it's being pushed pretty hard.
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Old 08-31-2022, 04:32 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dwf137 View Post
I primarily use my bike in summer time commuting situations, so air cooled doesn't work for me. Works for some people, especially if it's not their only bike as you mentioned.
Honestly, I'm not attempting to convince you to trade in your gorgeous Yammie for an air cooled 500lb lump.. I'm just trying to add some perspective.



My Bonneville had two oil pumps, one for lubrication and one low pressure pump for cooling, with a cooler mounted in front of the engine on the frame. The only thing it lacked was a thermostat on the cooling circuit, so it stayed cool on cold mornings (and I used to ride it year round in the NC mountains .. snow and all). There was no shortage of cooling capacity for the stock power and quite a bit beyond for the modding community.


I don't believe the Guzzi V7 has anything like that, but both of its cylinder heads are out in fresh air all the time. While heavily modded Harleys are out there overheating, the near-stock ones have no trouble circling the planet with far hotter weather than we see in the PNW.
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Old 08-31-2022, 04:44 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Calamity Jesus View Post
Honestly, I'm not attempting to convince you to trade in your gorgeous Yammie for an air cooled 500lb lump.. I'm just trying to add some perspective.

My Bonneville had two oil pumps, one for lubrication and one low pressure pump for cooling, with a cooler mounted in front of the engine on the frame. The only thing it lacked was a thermostat on the cooling circuit, so it stayed cool on cold mornings (and I used to ride it year round in the NC mountains .. snow and all). There was no shortage of cooling capacity for the stock power and quite a bit beyond for the modding community.


I don't believe the Guzzi V7 has anything like that, but both of its cylinder heads are out in fresh air all the time. While heavily modded Harleys are out there overheating, the near-stock ones have no trouble circling the planet with far hotter weather than we see in the PNW.
no worries man. My point was mostly that this is a pretty cool looking bike and it'd be a nice one to ride, I just don't know that it'd work for me... Maybe it would, but just adds another thing to think about where I'd rather be focusing on the road.

I get stuck in a lot of stop and go traffic. Heck, I rode my bike on that 115 degree day we had in seattle last year. Nice to hear that fan kick on and see that my temps remain consistent no matter the exterior temp. One less thing to worry about I guess.
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Old 09-07-2022, 02:22 PM   #12
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Overpriced and not that pretty... The Royal Enfield INT650 and the Continental GT has it beat in spades...$6k for 50hp, under 500 pounds and better looking than a Bonneville. Pretty hard to beat.



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Old 09-07-2022, 03:16 PM   #13
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Ahh.. see? Now that's what unreliable looks like.
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Old 09-08-2022, 02:36 AM   #14
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Ahh.. see? Now that's what unreliable looks like.
Really? Mine runs like a top. Way more reliable than my old Honda’s. Not single problem yet. What issues have you had with yours?
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Old 09-08-2022, 02:06 PM   #15
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Old 09-08-2022, 04:55 PM   #16
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