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Old 08-08-2021, 12:30 AM   #1
cc4usmc
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Join Date: Jul 2010
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Default Please confirm my disagnosis - Bad Wheel Bearings w/ video

Searched through over a dozen videos till I found one that seemed to match the noise coming from the front passenger side of my 2005 STI. Just wanted to run it by others to confirm.

https://streamable.com/af7o0z


Also, as a bonus, here's another sound I think I may have figured out. Would also like a confirmation, possibly without creating another thread and cluttering the forums. According to a comment found on another forum, it's possibly the rear hub nuts making noise when taking up drive. This seems like an appropriate cause, however I was not able to match that noise with a video because there was none. The sound I hear starts a little after halfway. Occurs first gear and reverse.


https://streamable.com/aqy93n
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Old 08-08-2021, 01:04 AM   #2
supermarkus
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sounds more like something is in your dust shield. get your car in the air and grab the top and bottom of the wheel. Rock the wheel in and out to look for motion. then get the wheel off and look to see if your dust shield is rubbing.
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Old 08-08-2021, 01:08 AM   #3
cc4usmc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supermarkus View Post
sounds more like something is in your dust shield. get your car in the air and grab the top and bottom of the wheel. Rock the wheel in and out to look for motion. then get the wheel off and look to see if your dust shield is rubbing.

For the top clip, yes? I thought that could be the case too, just wasn't going to be able to look tonight. Just did some research.
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Old 08-08-2021, 10:11 AM   #4
cc4usmc
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Anyone else?
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Old 08-08-2021, 03:34 PM   #5
Elbert Bass
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Noises in videos can be deceiving, especially one as short as the first one. Spatial perception is the all important factor in diagnosing noises so internet "listening" is subjective at best.

As mentioned lift the car and wiggle the wheel. Unfortunately in over 40 years less than 0.1% of wheel bearings I have diagnosed have been bad enough to cause a wobbly wheel.
Best way to confirm a bad wheel bearing (and easy since Subaru is AWD) is raise the car on a lift, hold the throttle at about 20-30 MPH road speed and listen to each hub with a mechanic's stethoscope. Quick, easy, and absolutely definitive.
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Old 08-09-2021, 09:52 AM   #6
cc4usmc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elbert Bass View Post
Noises in videos can be deceiving, especially one as short as the first one. Spatial perception is the all important factor in diagnosing noises so internet "listening" is subjective at best.

As mentioned lift the car and wiggle the wheel. Unfortunately in over 40 years less than 0.1% of wheel bearings I have diagnosed have been bad enough to cause a wobbly wheel.
Best way to confirm a bad wheel bearing (and easy since Subaru is AWD) is raise the car on a lift, hold the throttle at about 20-30 MPH road speed and listen to each hub with a mechanic's stethoscope. Quick, easy, and absolutely definitive.
It's only that clip that is short, due to me speaking right after the end. I edited out my voice. The noise seems to always be there and it did seem to get louder, however, I don't know if that was related to speed or heat in the area making the noise. The car is still on a etune base map so I don't drive it much yet. I should have mentioned that there are no noticeable changes to how the car drives. No wobbles, shaking, steering issues, etc. Just the noise, as far as I can tell. Thank you for contributing. I'll keep what you said in mind when I get into figuring out what's wrong today.
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Old 08-09-2021, 11:22 AM   #7
cc4usmc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elbert Bass View Post
Noises in videos can be deceiving, especially one as short as the first one. Spatial perception is the all important factor in diagnosing noises so internet "listening" is subjective at best.
No deception here.


https://streamable.com/px55ro


It was harder to take my skirts off for the lift than it was to find the source of the noise lol

Sadly, brakes are an area I am unfamiliar working with and paranoid about screwing up. Almost would have preferred bad wheel bearings.

Edit: I believe that I may have washed away the caliper slide bolt grease. I washed my car the other day, including spraying the wheels with wheel cleaner.


Last edited by cc4usmc; 08-09-2021 at 01:37 PM.
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Old 08-12-2021, 10:46 PM   #8
AliBenn
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I agree with supermarkus
Rock in between metal dust shield and brake rotor

Happened to me at an AutoX
I was advised to put car in reverse, drive backwards 15-20 yards and hit brakes
The rock dropped out and I made it to next run without any noise
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Old 09-02-2021, 11:02 PM   #9
cc4usmc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AliBenn View Post
I agree with supermarkus
Rock in between metal dust shield and brake rotor

Happened to me at an AutoX
I was advised to put car in reverse, drive backwards 15-20 yards and hit brakes
The rock dropped out and I made it to next run without any noise

So a rock in that spot can keep the calipers from releasing the rotor? As you can see from the picture I posted, the pads are still clasping the rotor. I can't get the pistons to move.
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Old 09-04-2021, 10:25 PM   #10
supermarkus
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You do know that the pads maintain very close contact to the rotor at all times. You'll have to loosen the fluid reservoir cap to be able to lever the pad away from the rotor enough to compress the pistons and remove the pads. Especially if your rotors have a lip on them. keep the reservoir cap wrapped with a rag in case it overflows when you push the pistons back
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Old 09-04-2021, 11:22 PM   #11
cc4usmc
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supermarkus View Post
You do know that the pads maintain very close contact to the rotor at all times. You'll have to loosen the fluid reservoir cap to be able to lever the pad away from the rotor enough to compress the pistons and remove the pads. Especially if your rotors have a lip on them. keep the reservoir cap wrapped with a rag in case it overflows when you push the pistons back

Done that already. I can't compress the pistons. Maybe with a compressor tool, but I haven't got one.
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Old 09-05-2021, 12:35 AM   #12
supermarkus
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have you tried pulling the pads half way out and using them to lever against the pistons? That's how I used to push them back before i had a tool. I never had issues with that old method.
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