Welcome to the North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club Tuesday June 25, 2019
Home Forums WikiNASIOC Products Store Modifications Upgrade Garage
NASIOC
Go Back   NASIOC > NASIOC Technical > Normally Aspirated Powertrain

Welcome to NASIOC - The world's largest online community for Subaru enthusiasts!
Welcome to the NASIOC.com Subaru forum.

You are currently viewing our forum as a guest, which gives you limited access to view most discussions and access our other features. By joining our community, free of charge, you will have access to post topics, communicate privately with other members (PM), respond to polls, upload content and access many other special features. Registration is free, fast and simple, so please join our community today!

If you have any problems with the registration process or your account login, please contact us.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads. 
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-21-2019, 11:26 AM   #1
rjahr01
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 451282
Join Date: Jul 2016
Default Replace replacement engine 2008 2.5 impreza

as the title states I have a 2.5 2008 impreza- last year around 145k miles I had a large tick, replaced the engine w/ a 78k impreza engine from a junkyard at a cost of $1700 for the engine plus $450 to install it- had them put a new timing belt on it at the same time- forward to last week (30k miles later) when I believe i must have starved it of oil and now I"m getting a loud rod knock (extremely loud). i had a slight oil leak caused by the oil sensor which i fixed but I must have had another leak seen now because the car was put in the garage backwards and is very apparent on the ground now.

What are my options- I've got another vehicle I am driving so i've got some time to figure this out-

Replace the short block- $1800 for a new one my mechanic can pull my engine for around $650 and swap everything out- another $200 for seals (gaskets)

Replace w/ another impreza engine they all seam to be around $1700 plus $450 to have mechanic install it-

Find another 253 engine that I may find for a cheaper price- someone said on here they found a legacy engine for $500 is that typical- seems impreza engine's are extremely high in price comared to when I replaced a trailblazer engine which I can find for $600 every day of the week.
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
rjahr01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
* Registered users of the site do not see these ads.
Old 04-23-2019, 11:35 AM   #2
Gamil
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 220375
Join Date: Aug 2009
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Vehicle:
2011 Outback Sport
Blue

Default

Your options are, ranked from least effort to most:
A) Sell the whole car
B) buy a used engine
C) buy a new short block
D) rebuild the block that you do have


A - my least favorite option, but considering the miles on the whole car, may be a valid option.

B - Always begs the questions of "Why is this being sold apart from it's original car?" and "What high-$$ job is going to be needed first" The EJ253 is kind of a family of engines. Even within the same model year, there will be slight variations between a Legacy/Outback EJ253 vs an impreza EJ253. e.g. My mom's 2011 Outback needs a 19mm wrench for the oil drain plug, but my 2011 Impreza uses a 17mm wrench. But, in terms of swapping them, should be plug-and-play. There's no reason why the model of the donor should matter in engine price. Miles yes, chassis model no.

C - Probably a decent mid point for balancing reliability, cost, and effort. Make sure you get the heads cleaned, decked and serviced. My EJ253 was burning oil that leaked past one of the #3 intake valve seals.

D - This is what I'm currently doing. Likewise, mine suffered oil starvation, but it was caused by the steep bank of Turn 3 at Pocono. If you're willing to do a lot of work yourself, this can be the cheapest option. Just do yourself a favor and get ACL race bearings they can actually be cheaper than OEM bearings, and they're much higher quality. If you're going to beat on the car, then consider some undersized bearings.

for options C and D, fork out some money to properly clean, deck and service the heads. If you do, then combined with a fresh block you'll basically have a new engine that'll last another 150k miles.

Should your block be too chewed up from wrecked bearings, then option D may morph into option C.

Oh, and don't let your mechanic use the factory NA head gasket. They're junk. Turbo head gaskets are much much better, or Felpro part # "26415 PT" is a good multilayer gasket

Last edited by Gamil; 04-23-2019 at 11:41 AM.
Gamil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-24-2019, 02:03 PM   #3
wtdash
Scooby Specialist
 
Member#: 59182
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: N. Idaho
Vehicle:
2002 WRX GG>>
2016 Focus RS

Default

B: You can use a EJ253 from a Legacy, OB, Impreza, Forester - should all be the same. From '06-'10? Or whenever they stopped making the EJ-series.

Reuse your IM w/harness, and cam/crank sprockets as there were some differences.

I don't know why but the same engine's price is dependent on what model from which it came.

Use Car-part.com, too.
wtdash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-28-2019, 02:00 PM   #4
rjahr01
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 451282
Join Date: Jul 2016
Default

Well I picked up an engine on ebay for $975.00 which was cheaper than before everything around me is $1,500 and up- my backyard mechanic will install for $450 and he'll transfer over the timing belt kit I just put in this past engine plus all new gaskets -

If I go that route and do it myself how much work is it- I'm fairly handy- just need an engine lift and rotator? How much money to have a machine shop do the work?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gamil View Post
Your options are, ranked from least effort to most:
A) Sell the whole car
B) buy a used engine
C) buy a new short block
D) rebuild the block that you do have


A - my least favorite option, but considering the miles on the whole car, may be a valid option.

B - Always begs the questions of "Why is this being sold apart from it's original car?" and "What high-$$ job is going to be needed first" The EJ253 is kind of a family of engines. Even within the same model year, there will be slight variations between a Legacy/Outback EJ253 vs an impreza EJ253. e.g. My mom's 2011 Outback needs a 19mm wrench for the oil drain plug, but my 2011 Impreza uses a 17mm wrench. But, in terms of swapping them, should be plug-and-play. There's no reason why the model of the donor should matter in engine price. Miles yes, chassis model no.

C - Probably a decent mid point for balancing reliability, cost, and effort. Make sure you get the heads cleaned, decked and serviced. My EJ253 was burning oil that leaked past one of the #3 intake valve seals.

D - This is what I'm currently doing. Likewise, mine suffered oil starvation, but it was caused by the steep bank of Turn 3 at Pocono. If you're willing to do a lot of work yourself, this can be the cheapest option. Just do yourself a favor and get ACL race bearings they can actually be cheaper than OEM bearings, and they're much higher quality. If you're going to beat on the car, then consider some undersized bearings.

for options C and D, fork out some money to properly clean, deck and service the heads. If you do, then combined with a fresh block you'll basically have a new engine that'll last another 150k miles.

Should your block be too chewed up from wrecked bearings, then option D may morph into option C.

Oh, and don't let your mechanic use the factory NA head gasket. They're junk. Turbo head gaskets are much much better, or Felpro part # "26415 PT" is a good multilayer gasket
rjahr01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2019, 04:55 PM   #5
Gamil
Scooby Newbie
 
Member#: 220375
Join Date: Aug 2009
Chapter/Region: MAIC
Location: Philadelphia, PA
Vehicle:
2011 Outback Sport
Blue

Default

$450 sounds like he would just be replacing the old head gaskets and timing belt bits then dropping it in the car. But, with a donor engine you want to know if it's been chewing up bearings.

So, put it on an engine stand to drain any oil and check for metal. If it doesn't have any oil, add a couple quarts, rotate the engine around a few times on the stand to slosh it about rotate the crank a couple times and then slosh the oils some more. Then wait 15 minutes and drain, again checking for metal. (Make sure you're draining into an extremely clean pan so you don't get a false positive on metal flakes.)

Pull the heads, check the cylinder walls for unusual wear, replace all the gaskets and seals in the heads, then bolt them back on with new head bolts. Should be a weekend's work.

The camshaft seals might require Torx Plus bits. I got these: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004UC9WJE. No, you can't use normal torx bits. There might also be a way to do the seals without unbolting anything, look around for a tutorial.

I don't know how much it'll cost for a local shop. You'll just have to call up a few places and ask.
Gamil is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:33 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Powered by Searchlight © 2019 Axivo Inc.
Copyright ©1999 - 2017, North American Subaru Impreza Owners Club, Inc.